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knocker

Irresponsible Public

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This in no way refers to the tragic death of the young woman in the cliff fall in Dorset but it does highlight a problem.

People do do not realise, or choose to ignore, both the danger of the cliffs and the sea in the west country. In the last couple of days the inshore rescue have been called about 8 times, luckerly there were no fatalities. One case was very lucky. A dog had fallen down a cliff and the the Rock inshore lifeboat, en route to the rescue, spotted a young girl trapped in a cave with the tide rising. She had about 30 minutes.

The cliffs are very unstable and there are frequent land slips and yet you still get this. You might need glasses to see the idiots.

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I'll hold my hand up and confess to being a prize idiot then.

You can't live your life worrying about what might happen, if you did, you wouldn't do much at all. I'll happily take risks and if I die in the process, well at least I'll have lived life to the full. As the saying goes....Life's journey isn't to arrive in the grave in a perfectly preserved body, it is to slide into the coffin sideways, totally sh**ged, screaming "Holy Sh*t...what a ride!"

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Agree with Jethro, another prize idiot here!

I've had a couple of dodgy experiences, especially mountain climbing in winter, traversing ice covered cliffs, etc. A few close and scary calls, but each winter I go back. Perhaps it's the adrenaline rush!?

We could all hide away and keep ourselves safe from all manner of dangerous, but it's likely things would be much more boring. To me, life is all about experiences, many of which involve risks that I'm happy to accept.

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I'll hold my hand up and confess to being a prize idiot then.

You can't live your life worrying about what might happen, if you did, you wouldn't do much at all. I'll happily take risks and if I die in the process, well at least I'll have lived life to the full. As the saying goes....Life's journey isn't to arrive in the grave in a perfectly preserved body, it is to slide into the coffin sideways, totally sh**ged, screaming "Holy Sh*t...what a ride!"

I'm glad you got that off your chest now perhaps we can get back on topic. I'm not talking about caculated risks or a philosophical debate about lifes journey. Although on that debate would you put your life at risk knowing the effect on your family? I'm talking about stupidity and expecting others to pick up the piecies. You seem to to think for some reason that it's worth ignoring warning signs so that one can slide fulfilled into the the grave. Very odd.

You are talking about making a personal decision, I'm talking about those who aren't actually thinking about that, not those of you who get an andrenalin rush. I must admit my heart skipped a beat yesterday. I took a boat trip down the Fal. Keep still my beating heart,

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Exactly. I'm not saying that this applies in Jethro's case, but why should personnel from the RNLI, Mountain Rescue, etc., risk their lives to save people who are too stupid to take notice of warnings and have gone out without minimal safety equipment?

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I'm guessing these rescuers are all volunteers and thus not being forced to put themselves at risk to help others?

As unfortunate as it is, we won't be able to prevent stupid actions (not checking tides before entering a coastal cave!) in our lifetimes. Folk will also continue to take risks that others deem idiotic, that's just how things are.

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Exactly. I'm not saying that this applies in Jethro's case, but why should personnel from the RNLI, Mountain Rescue, etc., risk their lives to save people who are too stupid to take notice of warnings and have gone out without minimal safety equipment?

Agreed CR. Every year, without fail, policemen & women, ambulance crews, lifeboat volunteers and mountain-rescue peeps risk their lives just because A. N. Other is either too thick or too lazy to think past the end of his/her nose...

I've been mountain climbing/walking on many occasions, and I've lost count of the number of times I've encountered eejits wearing flip-flops, trainers, tee-shirts and skimpy shorts...So, don't start me on those weirdies who, after days' worth of dire weather-warnings still insist on taking not the slightest bit of notice...

Let us not forget that he men who attempt to rescue these wallies also have wives and children!

But, as knocker made clear in the topic-opener, there's a world of difference between those who (having taken all the sensible precautions) get caught out and those who just don't seem to have any brains, or are simply to lazy to use them!

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I'm glad you got that off your chest now perhaps we can get back on topic. I'm not talking about caculated risks or a philosophical debate about lifes journey. Although on that debate would you put your life at risk knowing the effect on your family? I'm talking about stupidity and expecting others to pick up the piecies. You seem to to think for some reason that it's worth ignoring warning signs so that one can slide fulfilled into the the grave. Very odd.

You are talking about making a personal decision, I'm talking about those who aren't actually thinking about that, not those of you who get an andrenalin rush. I must admit my heart skipped a beat yesterday. I took a boat trip down the Fal. Keep still my beating heart,

My reply was totally on topic.

I see no warning signs on the above photo. What I see is a challenge, with the reward being reaching whatever the monument is at the top.

I'm not talking adrenaline rushes, although I've had a fair few of those over the years, I'm talking about viewing life as an adventure to enjoy. Life is full of risks, if you spend all your time thinking and calculating those risks you'll become stagnated by fear. I would bet a fair amount of money that more people are killed each year crossing the road than die in accidents whilst climbing cliffs or such like.

Modern life is full of health and safety rules and regulations, all fine and dandy in principle but whilst they protect a minority who may have had an accident, they also prevent the majority from doing things.

As for my family, I would rather teach them that life is fun and to be enjoyed, that it can be short, and instil them with confidence to be adventurous. About 12 years ago I nearly died from peritonitis, all medication was stopped, family told to say their goodbyes. About 15 years ago, hubby had the same experience, from the same disease. Only 6 weeks ago, my best friend had a massive heart attack aged 44 - thankfully he survived. We could all be dead with absolutely no connection to risk taking.

I didn't go through life looking for and worrying about what may go wrong before I nearly pegged it, nowt's changed. The likes of the Lifeboat folk do it through choice, it's a valuable service. During the course of my years spent diving around these shores I've met a fair few of them (just loitering around, not rescuing me) and a big bit of why they do it in the first place is they get an adrenaline rush from it.

I'm more than happy to sign a disclaimer which say's 'I'm an idiot, leading an idiotic life, I'm having fun but if I mess it up, feel free to stand and laugh, no rescues necessary'.

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Maybe the area in the photo should have been fenced off?

I can see both sides of the argument, but at the end of the day, if you want an adrenalin rush then take up an extreme sport. At least these can be done in a controlled environment (to a point) with minimal risk to others.

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Maybe the area in the photo should have been fenced off?

I can see both sides of the argument, but at the end of the day, if you want an adrenalin rush then take up an extreme sport. At least these can be done in a controlled environment (to a point) with minimal risk to others.

I'm not talking about adrenaline rushes, just everyday existence and not worrying about what may or may not happen.

There was a geologist giving a report about the cliff fall in Dorset - due to the nature of their composition the cliffs are always unstable. Sadly a young woman has died, she was doing nothing more than walking along the beach. Should the entire coastline now be fenced to prevent anyone going anywhere near the cliffs? Hundreds of thousands of people have walked those beaches and cliffs, no problems, should they have been concerned that the cliffs may collapse?

Life is a risk, by all means legislate or plan for high or extreme risk, but don't wrap the world and everyone in it in cotton wool on the basis of 'just in case'.

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My reply was totally on topic.

I see no warning signs on the above photo. What I see is a challenge, with the reward being reaching whatever the monument is at the top.

There are plenty of warnings that cannot be seen in the photo. What I failed to mention in the earlier post was that I'd bumped into these two wallies about an hour earlier when they had obviously just left the pub. It's fair to say they were feeling no pain. Need I say more.

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There are plenty of warnings that cannot be seen in the photo. What I failed to mention in the earlier post was that I'd bumped into these two wallies about an hour earlier when they had obviously just left the pub. It's fair to say they were feeling no pain. Need I say more.

That's just evolution isn't it? I've done daft things when a little tipsy, people do. I bet there's a higher risk involved from eating a burger from a takeaway van, or a kebab from a dodgy kebab house after a few drinks than slipping down a cliff like the one in the picture.

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I'm not talking about adrenaline rushes, just everyday existence and not worrying about what may or may not happen.

There was a geologist giving a report about the cliff fall in Dorset - due to the nature of their composition the cliffs are always unstable. Sadly a young woman has died, she was doing nothing more than walking along the beach. Should the entire coastline now be fenced to prevent anyone going anywhere near the cliffs? Hundreds of thousands of people have walked those beaches and cliffs, no problems, should they have been concerned that the cliffs may collapse?

Life is a risk, by all means legislate or plan for high or extreme risk, but don't wrap the world and everyone in it in cotton wool on the basis of 'just in case'.

Yes I agree, I am taking a risk crossing the road.

There is a difference between this and hiking up an unstable cliff face though (as shown in Knockers pic).

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I remember some years ago walking from Penzance to Lamorna Cove along the cliff path wearing shoes with heels!! I didn't intend to do it but by God I did it despite the pain. I was hell bent on getting back as well without resorting to buses or lifts. I know that's a tad off topic but it goes to show how easy it is to get carried away by beautiful scenery. And I suppose wearing the wrong shoes is dodgy along those cliff paths. (I bet Knocker knows the area I mean)

And I've climbed tors on Dartmoor however difficult, scrambled across rocky rivers and stood out in T storms and torrential rain and felt utterly exhilarated by it all. :D

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I remember some years ago walking from Penzance to Lamorna Cove along the cliff path wearing shoes with heels!! I didn't intend to do it but by God I did it despite the pain. I was hell bent on getting back as well without resorting to buses or lifts. I know that's a tad off topic but it goes to show how easy it is to get carried away by beautiful scenery. And I suppose wearing the wrong shoes is dodgy along those cliff paths. (I bet Knocker knows the area I mean)

And I've climbed tors on Dartmoor however difficult, scrambled across rocky rivers and stood out in T storms and torrential rain and felt utterly exhilarated by it all. biggrin.png

I do indeed K but it's the first time I've known of anyone rambling along wearing Jimmy Choos. Congratulaions on your detemination although I think you may have struggled a tad further along the coastal path. I think your greatest danger would have been doing an ankle, or two. But as you say the scenery is stunning.smile.png But best to admire it from the top and not halfway down the cliff.

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A headland very similar to this, about a mile east, collapsed last year. So unless you are into the thrill of danger it's not wise to perch near the edge. Fortunately my acrophobia kicks in well before that.

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I would bet that cliff climbing is statistically safer than something like jaywalking, yet everyone jaywalks!!

My point being that people take un-nessessary risks all the time, and if we didnt life would be a bit dull and boring.

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I would bet that cliff climbing is statistically safer than something like jaywalking, yet everyone jaywalks!!

My point being that people take un-nessessary risks all the time, and if we didnt life would be a bit dull and boring.

Frankly I find that ridiculous. So two wrongs make a right? The assumption is you have to make unecessary risks to lift your life out of becoming boring. Some people, the majority, manage this without resorting to stupidity. Much of the time life is dull and boring, live with it or try to climb the Matterhorn.

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A keen winter mountaineer myself, I love the thrill and exposure. Everyone to themselves....

Looking at the picture, they seem to be unaware of the dangers. So I agree, they are rather stupid.

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Frankly I find that ridiculous. So two wrongs make a right? The assumption is you have to make unecessary risks to lift your life out of becoming boring. Some people, the majority, manage this without resorting to stupidity. Much of the time life is dull and boring, live with it or try to climb the Matterhorn.

Or perhaps it's not about taking unnecessary risks to stop life being boring but rather a willingness and desire to get the most fun out of it. Life CAN be dull and boring but it doesn't HAVE to be. The difference between the two is choice, it's not pre-destined. My life is rarely dull or boring; daft, silly, exciting, often idiotic and to outsiders looking in, probably very stupid but me and mine are having a good time and laughing lots.

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This in no way refers to the tragic death of the young woman in the cliff fall in Dorset but it does highlight a problem.

People do do not realise, or choose to ignore, both the danger of the cliffs and the sea in the west country. In the last couple of days the inshore rescue have been called about 8 times, luckerly there were no fatalities. One case was very lucky. A dog had fallen down a cliff and the the Rock inshore lifeboat, en route to the rescue, spotted a young girl trapped in a cave with the tide rising. She had about 30 minutes.

The cliffs are very unstable and there are frequent land slips and yet you still get this. You might need glasses to see the idiots.

Idiots ???? Unless there is a great big sign or you have a PHD in geology I guess you are not going to know.

I was by a cliif to get shelter from the sun on holiday recently, probobaly wouldn't now although I wasn't looking to die.

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It all depends on the magnitude of risk vs. magnitude of increased convenience/enjoyment, and there is a difference between a calculated risk and outright recklessness. For example, I quite frequently jaywalk when there are no vehicles in the vicinity, but I certainly wouldn't do so if I knew that a vehicle was approaching.

And as for reckless idiots, they will always be around. As a society we need to learn to start tackling them directly rather than legislating for them via restrictions that wrap everyone else up in cotton wool.

I've walked near Marsden Cliff in South Tyneside on numerous occasions and have always been too afraid to go near the cliff edge, but it's probably possible to take far more risks than I've ever done with cliffs and still have only a low chance of being killed or injured. There are degrees of risk-taking though that border on suicidal.

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Idiots ???? Unless there is a great big sign or you have a PHD in geology I guess you are not going to know.

I was by a cliif to get shelter from the sun on holiday recently, probobaly wouldn't now although I wasn't looking to die.

I assume you deliberately chose to ignore my first sentence. I was talking about people who choose to ignore signs that point out out that these cliffs are unstable and the choose to climb down them or even sit on the edge.. Perhaps you are one of them then a PHD in common sense should be on your agenda.

Another example. You are on holiday and on the beach. There is a red flag flying with various notices saying on no account go into the sea when this is the case because of rip tides. In they go........................

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