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chionomaniac

Football - Goal Line Technology

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I think that FIFA's recent decision to bring in goal line technology is to be welcomed and long overdue. I believe that two systems are being trialled - one involving sensors in the ball and the other using Hawkeye technology.

In Cricket, I think that Hawkeye has been a tremendous success and in the recent Test series highlighted what a great job the umpires actually do with the number of decisions that were originally correct.

In cricket the first thing that is reviewed is whether the ball delivered is a no ball or not. I wonder will something similar happen in football regarding off side. For instance it has been mentioned many times that Ukraine were denied a legitimate goal against England in the Euros recently - but I saw very little coverage to the fact that one of their players was clearly off side in the build up. Would that be considered in the new law?

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In cricket the first thing that is reviewed is whether the ball delivered is a no ball or not. I wonder will something similar happen in football regarding off side. For instance it has been mentioned many times that Ukraine were denied a legitimate goal against England in the Euros recently - but I saw very little coverage to the fact that one of their players was clearly off side in the build up. Would that be considered in the new law?

Interesting point chio. I watch a fair bit of rugby league and they do include off sides in their use of the technology. I appreciate it's a completely different game but it works very well and I see no reason why it shouldn't in football.

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I think it should be limited to simple matters of fact - did the ball cross the line, type questions - as I'd hate to see entire games drag-on like NFL games do?

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I think it should be limited to simple matters of fact - did the ball cross the line, type questions - as I'd hate to see entire games drag-on like NFL games do?

I would rather that the decisions were correct. Technology nowadays will allow quick analysis rather than a long drawn out process. I would hate to see a video match referee give a goal that was over the line even though he knew that the player involved was off side.

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I agree. Reverting to rugby league again the offside decisions are very quick, it's the decisions regarding the grounding that can take an age. The same applies in union but it doesn't spoil the game IMO. And at the end of the day, with often much hinging on it, surely the correct decision is paramount.

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Video replays for things like fouls etc. are a big no-no for me. Goal-line technology is where I would draw the line.

However, the current system could be made to incorporate common sense. Retrospective action from authorities even if the referees saw it in the game for example. It's so infuriating to see a red card offence on the pitch, a ref to give a yellow and the FA to hide behind the old "the referee dealt with it" line.

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Video replays for things like fouls etc. are a big no-no for me. Goal-line technology is where I would draw the line.

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I relly don't see a problem with having a quick look for off side. It can be done whilst the players are all having a quick kiss and congratulting each other. It may even save time and would certainly rule out controversy.

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Last thing we want is a 90 minute game to stretch out to 130 minutes due to all the appeals etc. Just leave it for the goal line.

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Last thing we want is a 90 minute game to stretch out to 130 minutes due to all the appeals etc. Just leave it for the goal line.

Why does that not happen in rugby league then?

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I would rather that the decisions were correct. Technology nowadays will allow quick analysis rather than a long drawn out process. I would hate to see a video match referee give a goal that was over the line even though he knew that the player involved was off side.

if in this case the referee knows the player is offside the goal wouldn't count regardless if the ball crossed the line or not.

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Why does that not happen in rugby league then?

Players don't spend so much time rolling around in agony, forgetting which leg's going to need amputation, in RL...

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if in this case the referee knows the player is offside the goal wouldn't count regardless if the ball crossed the line or not.

The referee on the pitch may not know that the player was offside as the assistant may have made an incorrect call. However the video replay suggests that the ball was over the line but that the player was also off side. What does the video ref call if his jurisdiction is just to determine whether the ball was over the line or not?

This is where common sense should prevail.

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Players don't spend so much time rolling around in agony, forgetting which leg's going to need amputation, in RL...

I just love too see these players get red carded. Too be honest the more they roll about the less hurt they are. One of these days though a ref is going to miss a serious incident due to this play making.

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Can anyone clarify how far this gial line technology will go dwn the leagues? Is it just premership and European fixtures or Championship and beyond?

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The referee on the pitch may not know that the player was offside as the assistant may have made an incorrect call. However the video replay suggests that the ball was over the line but that the player was also off side. What does the video ref call if his jurisdiction is just to determine whether the ball was over the line or not?

This is where common sense should prevail.

I see i understand your question..im guessing the goal would stand as the video is there to judge whether the ball has crossed the line and nothing else..it is not in place to view the passage of play leading up to the incident.

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I see i understand your question..im guessing the goal would stand as the video is there to judge whether the ball has crossed the line and nothing else..it is not in place to view the passage of play leading up to the incident.

Which is why I'd prefer the transmitter-in-the ball idea. For starters, anyway??

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Can anyone clarify how far this gial line technology will go dwn the leagues? Is it just premership and European fixtures or Championship and beyond?

As far as I know it won't. It will be confined to the premier league and I'm not at all sure it will apply to all European club fixtures. I doubt the clubs in the lower leagues could afford it.

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I see i understand your question..im guessing the goal would stand as the video is there to judge whether the ball has crossed the line and nothing else..it is not in place to view the passage of play leading up to the incident.

That is what I would fear - which is why I think they should check that the chance is not off side first. Can you imagine the outcry if a video ref gave a goal that he knew was offside?

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Last thing we want is a 90 minute game to stretch out to 130 minutes due to all the appeals etc. Just leave it for the goal line.

Funny you should say this, because of the 90 minutes the ball is typically in play only between 60 and 70 minutes - less time than rugby even though that is 80 mins. There's plenty of time for video-refs to have a quick look and assist the ref from making a complete balls-up - commentators and us viewers are able to do it more or less instantly on an action replay.

And the system wouldn't be there for teams to appeal, just for the ref's benefit - in any case, players do plenty of appealing and haranguing of the ref already.

Any comparison with NFL is wrong because they stop between every play of the ball, equivalent to each pass, and also swap teams between offense and defense (their spelling!)

Why does that not happen in rugby league then?

Because it is the superior game!

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That is what I would fear - which is why I think they should check that the chance is not off side first. Can you imagine the outcry if a video ref gave a goal that he knew was offside?

Yeah, I don't see a problem with using video technology to help the ref in these situations - they accept that the refs miss things and are happy to use video evidence when judging cases of foul play after the event.

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Because it is the superior game!

Can't argue with that.

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I do like the report option they have in RL, this will also allow the authorities the option of looking at incidents the referee has seen

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I'm aware of the argument, "if you open the door to video technology you potentially open Pandora's box" but that's really a fallacious example of a slippery slope argument, as it will only happen that way if authorities progressively introduce more and more technology to help referees and neglect the need to strike a balance between negating the worst mistakes and slowing the game down too much.

Some argue that it will prevent talking points but I don't think that argument works either, as we will still get marginal decisions where the Match of the Day pundits argue either way as to whether it should have been given or not, no matter how much technology we use. The idea is to cut out the clear-cut injustices.

Some argue that it's not fair to implement it in the Premier League but not lower divisions. I think that's a poor line of argument too- you may as well argue that we shouldn't use Hawk-Eye in major snooker tournaments or give stewards access to video replays in Formula One because lower-down competitions can't afford to have that benefit.

I strongly support goal-line technology and I think that, in moderation, this technology could probably be extended to things like offside decisions, red cards and penalties without slowing the game down too much (the time spent consulting video evidence in marginal cases may not be significantly longer than the time spent by referees fighting off players who are surrounding them and consulting other officials). However I think applying it any further, e.g. to free kicks/yellow cards, would be overkill and could well slow down the game significantly.

Ultimately if we get more technology available to help referees then we will see a drop in the number of clear-cut injustices and thus justify being more hard-line with things like the "Respect" campaign.

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As someone who follows non league I cannot say GL technology bothers me too much. In reality it s such a rare event that even go to 1 or 2 games a week you are not likely to see one given or not given wrongly for hundreds of games. Yes we have had a few close calls but the majority of those decisions are right.

Having just edited 57 games worth of footage for last season, I would say the biggest impact on the game is offsides. @10% of goals given are close to being with probably half of them being proved as off on video without too much.

I think its probably a bad move for the game overal as it opens the door to more technology which I dont think would be good for the game.

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The problem is that technology is used to scrutinise every decision made in a quick moving sport. This allows television replays to analyse every decision quickly and make a judgement on whether the official has made the right call or not. The managers of teams are quick to use these replays when it suits them and yet turn a blind eye when it doesn't.

The technology is there and can be used quickly without disrupting the game. I say bring it on - you may just see some cheats thinking twice knowing that the referee could ask for clarification from a video referee and action can be taken immediately.

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