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I want to grow lilies next year, are they frost hardy or do you need to move or cover them?

they are frost hardy to a degree, its usual to plant them about 15cm deep so they dont actually get frosted, especially when planted in the ground. but mine in pots are more suseptible, obviously, so i do protect them from the worst, citing the pots next to the house or trees/shrubs. its best if they are kept on the dry side too, not completely dry but rather dry autumn-spring. i let my pots get rained in by late feb.

they like to mature, and some varieties can get quite tall after 3-5 years if left undisturbed. that suits ground planted bulbs best, and they need well drained but organic soil (soil with a lot of organic matter in it) . pot grown plants will need fertiliser after the first year, and i change the compost every so often. thats no problem, its easy enough, and some varieties produce a lot of bulbs too that need removing and potting on.

i should add that generally speaking, the asiatic lilies arent scented, the orientals, trumpets, martagons (turks cap) and ot hybrids (oriental/trumpet ) are and sometimes quite pleasantly strong!

Edited by mushymanrob
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Woke up to find that my hazel nut tree had been raided by squirrels. I put a net around my nuts yet they still got to them. :vava: Saw three critters in my tree and I ran out to save what was left of my nuts, yet the squirrels just climbed to the top and sat there mocking me. They left me two nuts, the generous onions, no doubt they will be back for them tomorrow. They are so clever, if they want your nuts they will get them, no matter what. On another sad note, my melons are drying up. :cray:

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Everything has taken for ever this year to bloom, think the nights were a little cold for them earlier in the summer and we've had a dreadful pesky wind for what seems most of the summer months and so the baskets have taken quite a bashing. One plant that was splendid this year was my climbing rose, it was an absolute picture. Anyway this is my garden complete with a 50 year old tortoise playing with his pot

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These are the evening visitors to my garden, bless the little monsters!

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Woke up to find that my hazel nut tree had been raided by squirrels. I put a net around my nuts yet they still got to them. :vava: Saw three critters in my tree and I ran out to save what was left of my nuts, yet the squirrels just climbed to the top and sat there mocking me. They left me two nuts, the generous onions, no doubt they will be back for them tomorrow. They are so clever, if they want your nuts they will get them, no matter what. On another sad note, my melons are drying up. :cray:

Poor nuts and melons !

Now see this is why I had to make a return .... To check how your nuts and melons were coming along ;)

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Poor nuts and melons !

Now see this is why I had to make a return .... To check how your nuts and melons were coming along ;)

Lol! I think that was too much information I gave out. :doh: I am indeed nutless and my melons have shriveled up :vava:

 

These are the evening visitors to my garden, bless the little monsters!

What a nice garden you have snowycat, what do you feed the monster?

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Lol! I think that was too much information I gave out. :doh: I am indeed nutless and my melons have shriveled up :vava:

 

What a nice garden you have snowycat, what do you feed the monster?

Thank you lassie, its hard work though. The little monsters get bread and jam. I do shut the gate after their tea to try and keep them out overnight as they can do damage rooting around and digging for stuff but they often find a route back in such as they have the last couple of nights I'm trying to make friends with a stray cat to get him sorted out but a little monster is getting back in to pinch his food - I can always tell its a little monster because the dishes are flung round the shed. Will be spending time this morning trying to find the hole they've made

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My grass seed is starting to poke through at last as i moved my veg patch last year to a better location.

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Has anyone tried growing hull-less pumpkin seed varieties of pumpkins? I am interested in trying to get hold of some true-breeding seed and wondered if anyone had had successes. Apparently they are common in Austria! Many thanks

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My tomatoes an bell peppers are only just starting to come out. A bit late methinks???

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My tomatoes an bell peppers are only just starting to come out. A bit late methinks???

My tomatoes are still small and green too. :(  The weather has turned early this year, they need a miracle. Wonder what would happen if a picked them and kept them indoors, would they ripen, even though they are premature? The herbs and onions grew well, so did the beans. The watermelon plants are dead, the squirrels ate all my hazel nuts and only on apple out of bumper crop, was maggot free. :( How can you keep maggots at bay without spraying your apple tree with nasty chemicals?

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Tomatoes will ripen on a sunny windowsill but they're always rather tasteless, google 'recipes for green tomatoes' instead, there are some really tasty suggestions out there.

 

You can get apple maggot traps from most garden centres, they're yellow, sticky traps you hang in the tree, usually from early June onwards. I've heard of folk using a dilute solution of kaolin clay mixed in water to spray the trees when the fruit is set, but before it starts to get very big; allegedly it coats the fruit making it unattractive to the maggot fly. Never tried it so no idea if it works or not.

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Tomatoes will ripen on a sunny windowsill but they're always rather tasteless, google 'recipes for green tomatoes' instead, there are some really tasty suggestions out there.

 

You can get apple maggot traps from most garden centres, they're yellow, sticky traps you hang in the tree, usually from early June onwards. I've heard of folk using a dilute solution of kaolin clay mixed in water to spray the trees when the fruit is set, but before it starts to get very big; allegedly it coats the fruit making it unattractive to the maggot fly. Never tried it so no idea if it works or not.

Thanks for the info Jethro, I will pick the tomatoes before the frosts come and leave them indoors, shame that they lose their taste though. I had a lot of apples this year, but they were all maggot infested, such a waste, I will have to look into organic apple growing and see what they do.

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Same here with the tomatoes, late in but under cover. Although they have a reasonable amount of fruit, none of it has started to ripen yet and I doubt it will, especially with the cool weather up here at the moment.

 

Dwarf and runner beans have done reasonably well, courgettes as well. Turnips, swede and beetroot are all looking rather pathetic.

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So I picked my carrots today as they were ready to come up. Looked nice and big. But I discover that some bugger has got to them before I did and eaten the bottom half off most of them. So my carrot yield has basically been cut in half (or is that eaten?)

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So I picked my carrots today as they were ready to come up. Looked nice and big. But I discover that some bugger has got to them before I did and eaten the bottom half off most of them. So my carrot yield has basically been cut in half (or is that eaten?)

Slugs like carrots, are there any around?

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No, I use animal friendly pellets (apart from to slugs obviously!). I think a mole or something might have been at them because there's definite bite marks, but I can't see any evidence of moles.

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No, I use animal friendly pellets (apart from to slugs obviously!). I think a mole or something might have been at them because there's definite bite marks, but I can't see any evidence of moles.

That's a new one on me, as you can imagine, there are no moles in London, do you have rabbits in Medway?

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Yes, we have loads as we live next to fields, but they weren't dug up at all.

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Yes, we have loads as we live next to fields, but they weren't dug up at all.

That is a mystery then, rats, rabbits and squirrels etc would dig them up, moles would eat them from underground, but you can't see any evidence of them, what else visits your garden that could possibly eat a carrot like that is beyond me. Why eat just the bottom parts of each? Ever had this before?

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My Christmas potatoes are doing very well this year was a mixed year for some things not a lot to do in the garden now just awaiting on January for the first seeds to be sown as the whole process begins again

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Daffodil bulbs are starting to break through the ground already I've often had them through by mid December but never this early

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Here we are on the 12th November and I've still got Delphiniums in flower (third crop of flowers this year) roses, penstemon, dahlias, cornflowers, verbena, asters, sedum etc etc all still covered in flowers. There's tomatoes and peppers in the greenhouse (unheated) sweet peas still going strong outside and frost tender lettuce & courgettes still cropping away like it's mid summer.

 

Never known a year like it. It's bonkers I tell you, bonkers!

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