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Think I'm gonna have to surrender my brassicas - the sheer volume of butterflies and their eggs everywhere means I think I'm going to loose most plants to them.

Next time I need to net I think!

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Think I'm gonna have to surrender my brassicas - the sheer volume of butterflies and their eggs everywhere means I think I'm going to loose most plants to them.

Next time I need to net I think!

Try growing nasturtiums?Posted Image

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hi all

 

veg doing great here now after a slow start they finally decided to notice the lovely weather and fruiting rapidly now Posted Image tomatoes still small i think its time to pinch off tops and let them grow bigger and ripen.

 

just wondering about my clematis.  Each yeah they grow well but start to get yellow/brown leaves from the bottom moving up the plant. i was just wondering if i should feed them with anything? they just look like they are exhausted from all the growing and flowering.  i was thinking to give them some liquid seaweed? but then someone said dont feed them when they are flowering so i'm not sure.  is it normal for them to brown off from the bottom? i have been watering a lot so i doubt its a lack of water.

Posted ImageIMAG1133.jpg

 

also, if anyone recalls the saga of my kiftsgate rose? heres the original post: http://forum.netweather.tv/topic/73128-net-weather-gardening-thread/?p=2679014

 

it was all looking good, shoots all over from the base all the way to the top but unfortunately all the upper shoots died off and all that remains are the shoots at the bottom.  i guess its telling me it wants to be cut right down? ok to do this now or should i wait till autumn? i dont want to cause it any more distress/shock after what it went thru in spring! from how slowly it has grown these past couple months its clear that its still struggling (its usally a very very rampant grower)

 

 

Hi SS,

 

My Clematis does exactly the same thing despite lots of TLC. I would like to know the solution too.

 

As for your Rose, I would prune it right back. You will hopefully get new growth to make it stronger for the winter Posted Image 

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Hi SS and JanPosted Image

 

I find with a lot of clematis that they don't like their soil and roots to be too wet on the one hand, but then on the other hand they don't like too much direct strong sunlight at the bottom of the plant either.  The two I have are positioned on the patio against the conservatory which is south facing and gets a lot of sun and is very warm, However I have arranged it so that dappled sunlight only gets to the lower part of the plants and the compost etc whilst the top part gets full sun and encourages lots of flowering buds.  In this way, the warmth of the position means that the compost dries quickly and requires daily water (in the absence of rain) but by never staying saturated for too long it prevents any risk of leaves changing colour and even leaf drop.The lack of strong direct sunlight at the bottom though also prevents stress to the plant. 

 

In this way, the plants appreciate the frequent watering, but they neither dry out or stay saturated, and also I do a feed about every fortnight as well. I use a combination of a standard clematis feed and also old fish tank water from inside the house (a good source of nitrogen which the plants thrive on)

 

Whatever I am doing, it seems to be working anyway!!Posted Image I try and trust my nurturing intuition with gardening as much as I do with other creative thingsPosted Image

Edited by Tamara Road
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Whatever happened to Charlie Dimmock?Posted Image  She worked with Alan Titchmarsh a while back I think. The Gardeners World team has changed so many times over the yearsPosted Image

Edited by Tamara Road

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Whatever happened to Charlie Dimmock?Posted Image  She worked with Alan Titchmarsh a while back I think. The Gardeners World team has changed so many times over the yearsPosted Image

 

Thankfully, she disappeared into the ether.

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Thankfully, she disappeared into the ether.

I agreePosted ImagePosted Image   I just wondered that was all..

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Everything in my veggie garden seems to be 'super sized' this year - corn and toms at 6 ft and still going up, the alliums put on a fine show and a good harvest of seeds, so attempting to sow from seed this time around. our grapevine, is only in its 2nd year and has a great bounty of grapes and not long planted a kiwi, so hoping it will establish and reward with fruits in afew years. Apart from that its been building a new greenhouse and landscaping the top third of the garden from scratch (with a nice trip to Hampton Court with a long list of wants :-)

Looking forward to planting out overwintering varieties and making the use of the space. I have a raised bed with bamboo canes (filled with beans and climbing cucumbers at the moment) it creates a barrier/hidden 2nd veggie area and partitions it from the garden borders etc. If anyone has suggestion for varieties of autumn/wintering climbing veg which has done well in chalky soil, ideas would be really welcome!

P.s. It's really nice, I've never much ventured out of the regional thread, so great to find a gardening thread hidden in the lounge!!

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Just noticed a large proportion of my ripe tomatoes have been eaten by something - large holes in the flesh.

I'm thinking maybe squirrels are doing it as we have plenty of them about the area and I've seen them in my yard too. 

Anyone had similar problems and how did you go about ridding yourself of them?

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Just noticed a large proportion of my ripe tomatoes have been eaten by something - large holes in the flesh.

I'm thinking maybe squirrels are doing it as we have plenty of them about the area and I've seen them in my yard too. 

Anyone had similar problems and how did you go about ridding yourself of them?

 

Have a lot of problems with Squirrels at work, they strip things off rather than leave them hanging on the plant and nibble - if it's Squirrels, there will be lots of chewed debris around too, they're really messy eaters. Could be Mice but could also be slugs - on the bright side, it's unlikely to be Rats.

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Mice is another option as we had one in the roof over winter (but obviously found somewhere better for summer!). Seen small holes dug in the soil from time to time especially after using fish, blood & bone ferts.

 

Just had a good look round and pulled off a massive caterpillar that was sat on a tomato (it was brown-green in colour). Leaves are full of holes too and I found brown/red eggs on a leaf which is different to the yellow eggs that are infesting literally every square inch of my brassicas - even the tiny mizuna seedlings are getting covered. Trying to remove the eggs from my important plants but bit of a loosing battle really - the butterfly population is enormous this year!

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my blackberries are very early this year, had plenty of beans, onions, spuds, and lettuce, cucumbers nearly ready as are the peppers, broccoli is quite slow though, the toms are still small and green but they have done fantastically, in mid june they were only about 3 inches tall as i had to plant new seeds in mid may as the first lot of toms died from the cold so im glad we had a hot july to speed them up and i need august and september to be above average too

Edited by Tony27

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Made a montage of photos of the 'green and flowery' in our garden a few days ago to make a birthday card for my better half (it's tomorrow)

 

we're opening up our garden for the NGS (National Garden Scheme) on Sun 11th Aug, 2nd time this year and hope some of the colour is still going... [fingers crossed emoticon]  there's always cakes and tea if anyones passing (-:

 

Won't give out full address here but we're listed in the NGS yellow book & website. Welwyn, Herts.

 

post-884-0-35828900-1375715216_thumb.jpg

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not logged on for a few days - so a belated thank you to Tamara and Jethro for your replies Posted Image

 

i can't really change the position of the clematis but will try regular feeding and see if they are any better next year.  I never feed them, just water regularly so worth a try.

I've got 6 clematis in all and the only one that doesnt brown off from the bottom or show any sign of disease is Montana.

Romantika has hardcore mildew this year - i guess the humidity hasn't helped. 

 

Bottesford: My fruit/veg are fine but i have noticed lots of holes in the leaves of the tomatoes and cucumbers - much more than recent years.  Actually pretty much all my plants have been nibbled a lot more than usual this year - some of my smaller roses have no leaves left, just skeletons! i'm guessing abundance of caterpillars and those 'evil' ladybirds?

 

I've pinched off the tops of my tomato plants and now hoping the fruit will ripen - taking their sweet time though!

 

Kiftsgate has been cut right down btw.

 

Hey nice montage pixel Posted Image i'm not far from you, might drop by

Edited by Suburban Streamer
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@ Suburban Streamer - You'd be unlucky to kill a MontanaPosted Image

 

Clematis like a feed if you have em in pots and as Tamara said they don't really like direct sun at the base, maybe you could re-pot into a larger one and grow something low in the same pot so as to protect the base of the clematis from the sun ?  All of ours are in the ground and are protected by the plants in front at a distance to prevent the mildew.  We've found that most of the clematis take 2 or three years to get going whilst they are developing good roots and pruning them can vary.. look up the pruning code for yours and the time of year to do it.

I forgot which type one of our was and didn't cut it back... thought it had died in spring but new shoots appeared from the ground just as i was giving up hope... I cut the old growth down to the ground and its now bigger and floweryer than last year - This Clematis taught me how to treat it next year! 

 

As for roses, they can come back from nothing after a good cut.. a little farmyard manure mixed with peat free compost at the base after a hard prune seems to work for us. We recon 1 part manure to 4 parts compost. Experiment but not too much manure as it scorches the plant.

 

ps it's chucking it down with rain here - water butts all full Posted Image

Edited by Pixel
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@ Suburban Streamer - You'd be unlucky to kill a MontanaPosted Image

 

Clematis like a feed if you have em in pots and as Tamara said they don't really like direct sun at the base, maybe you could re-pot into a larger one and grow something low in the same pot so as to protect the base of the clematis from the sun ?  All of ours are in the ground and are protected by the plants in front at a distance to prevent the mildew.  We've found that most of the clematis take 2 or three years to get going whilst they are developing good roots and pruning them can vary.. look up the pruning code for yours and the time of year to do it.

I forgot which type one of our was and didn't cut it back... thought it had died in spring but new shoots appeared from the ground just as i was giving up hope... I cut the old growth down to the ground and its now bigger and floweryer than last year - This Clematis taught me how to treat it next year! 

 

As for roses, they can come back from nothing after a good cut.. a little farmyard manure mixed with peat free compost at the base after a hard prune seems to work for us. We recon 1 part manure to 4 parts compost. Experiment but not too much manure as it scorches the plant.

 

ps it's chucking it down with rain here - water butts all full Posted Image

 

yep montana is as hardy as they come! mine must have been there for about 25 years now!!

 

yes the two clematis in pots are the weakest/fussiest/hungriest/thirstiest.  Whilst they are in deep pots and the sun doesnt shine directly into the pots, i'm sure this years plentiful sunshine has probably heated the pots during the day, making the soil and roots rather warm - but then again compared to last years rainy/cool summer, the actual clematis dont look much different, so not sure how much they have been affected by this years hot july.  My gut tells me its more of an imbalance/difficiency. But i will try planting something else in the pots to provide a bit more shade, and I will definately feed them and hope it makes a difference next year. I am determined to find the right balance that they need and eradicate the browning off - might take a few seasons though! 

My newest clematis which i planted in the ground last year is doing very well (its Polish Spirit and pretty disease resistant, apparently).  Its base is well shaded and the top gets plenty of sun - just the way they like it.

For pruning i just stick to the saying "if it flowers before june, dont prune" so i basically cut them all right down around mid feb - apart from montana.

 

Thanks for your reply Posted Image

Edited by Suburban Streamer
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It sounds more like it's due to the inevitable cycle of drying out/getting wet that happens with pots, planted in the ground it will have a more even water supply. Things in pots also need more food as the roots cannot go off looking for it over a wide area, so a good dose of general feed once a month will help; also mix a couple of good handfuls of water storage granules in with the compost - works wonders to stabilise the water supply.

 

The most important thing with Clematis, whether in a pot or the ground, it to plant it deep. General advise of planting things to the same depth they were in when you brought them home from the garden centre, should be ignored for Clematis - plant them so the top of the compost is 4-5 inches below ground level. This does two things, it encourages more and stronger shoots and protects against Clematis Wilt. Wilt is fungal, it comes in on the wind and will kill the entire top of a Clematis, if you've planted it deep enough, although the top dies, it will shoot again from below ground. 

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Not liking the look of these cool nights this week - I know full well how the chillies & peppers hate it below 15c at night! They're doing quite well with plants ranging from fully laden with big (green) chillies to ones with next to nothing on them - mostly the ones now shaded out by the dense foliage in front of them.

 

Main two lessons I'm taking from this year in the garden:

- Planting things too close together is not good coupled with my garden is far too small and doesn't have enough light.

- Butterfly netting is vital!

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If it turns as cool as some are suggesting then go steady on the watering, especially if you've packed them in a bit tight. It's better for them to be a bit dry than wet, otherwise you'll end up with fungal problems. You can remove leaves from the Chillies to encourage ripening, apply the same principle as you would for Tomatoes. 

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 You can remove leaves from the Chillies to encourage ripening, apply the same principle as you would for Tomatoes. 

 

Please elaborate J! Remove all the leaves or just those that are a littled jaded and presumably serving no useful purpose? What about the flower buds ( mine still have loads right at the uppermost tips) - should I remove those too, seeing as I guess they're unlikely to come to much with it getting on in the season?  Did a quick count this morning and I've got 47 big,big chillis just waiting to ripen!

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Removing leaves... now I've not tried that before. I've nipped terminal buds out before but not leaves as such.

The toms are topped and I've removed the decaying lower foliage which def helps with watering.

Peppers are still flowering & forming at the moment so seems a tad early to pinch the blooms out. But then I know I've prob got 6 weeks at best before the sun is too low to ripen them anymore.

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yes i've not tried removing the leaves off my chilli plants before either.  They need some encouragement to ripen so i'll give it a try.  Really weird this year: i've got loads of green chillies but they are really bland, hardly any heat at all.  Would have thought our hot july would have made some killer chillies but last years were much much hotter.  Will remove the leaves when i get home.

 

I think my fruit/veg are in a time warp and think its summer 2012!

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The green ones are rarely very hot - need to let 'em ripen to get the heat. I'm sure our sunny July is in there - just needs more sun & warmth to ripen. Peppers are quite a long season crop and they've only had 5 or so weeks of really decent conditions so far. We need another July!

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Need some help here my tomatoes are now starting to ripen they are really soft on the vine when I squeeze them to see if there ready but when I cut them open there is still a fair amount of green inside is there something I'm doing wrong?

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Chillie plants and leaves.....I've just removed a load today. There are no hard and fast rules but I generally remove any that are lower down the stem and those which are shading the Chillies. Leaves are just there to receive sunlight and feed the plant via photosynthesis, if you're regularly feeding the plants, they don't require as many leaves. The leafier the plant, the more the energy goes into saving the leaves - remove some and that energy gets re-directed into making fruit and ripening it.

 

Tomatoes still green inside.....most varieties are, only when they're on the point of falling off the plant will most of them redden up inside. Nice and red outside is the important bit but even that isn't that important, if you pick them before they're fully red, they'll still ripen off the plant and keep for longer if you're not using them immediately.

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