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Net Weather Gardening Thread

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With slim chance of rain ariving in the next few days (daaan ere) there's nothing like adorning a few earplugs with music whilst watering the garden - 'John Hopkins' (too many tracks to mention - google is your friend) accompanied me this eve.  Music while you work..!  it can't get better on an eve like this what ever your taste in music. And the Magnolia still has a flower ! What a weird yet fab spring into summer.

post-884-0-56624400-1370284018_thumb.jpgpost-884-0-00454900-1370284039_thumb.jpg

Edited by Pixel

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Well its all just growing fabulously!<br />Got all my peppers & chillies into raised beds in the greenhouse and now the first flowers are appearing on them. Hopefully no flower drop like last year.<br />Toms going well with fruits rapidly swelling; potato foliage enormous- can't be long till earlies are done!<br />One mistake I've made it forgetting to sow things like spinach regularly as now the very productive plants have become old and I now have a drought until the seedlings get big enough.<br />Just hope this glorious weather is a regular thing this summer although with increasing temps - especially at night.

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Just wondering when the ideal time to buy my orange or lemon tree is?

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Just wondering when the ideal time to buy my orange or lemon tree is?

 

Whenever you like, they're usually available all year round. Have a good look around the internet to see which one you fancy the most, or would best suit where you want to grow it. Some varieties are more expensive than others. I'd advise buying the biggest you can afford as they're fairly slow growing and can be slow to fruit. When it arrives it will be in a plastic pot, re-pot it into a terracotta one. The plastic holds the water in, terracotta lets it drain more freely and as they're naturally Mediterranean plants, you want to replicate as much as possible their growing conditions of free draining, gritty soil; impossible in a plastic pot where they're more prone to root rot, especially during the winter months. If you keep it warm all winter, you'll barely need to reduce watering but if you keep it in a cool or unheated room, you must reduce the watering, keeping the soil barely moist.

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That's it,i've had enough. Ants. Had them in a greenhouse for the last 2 years and just about coped ,but this year,the buggars have got a lot worse.

Not to bothered with them eating the odd annual or two,always have to many of them anyway,but this year they are targeting my perennial seedlings.

 

Their final nail in the coffin came yesterday when they ate all but 2 of my rudbechia maxima seedlings,could have cried.Posted Image

 

Question,whats the best way of shoeing them out?

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That's it,i've had enough. Ants. Had them in a greenhouse for the last 2 years and just about coped ,but this year,the buggars have got a lot worse.

Not to bothered with them eating the odd annual or two,always have to many of them anyway,but this year they are targeting my perennial seedlings.

 

Their final nail in the coffin came yesterday when they ate all but 2 of my rudbechia maxima seedlings,could have cried.Posted Image

 

Question,whats the best way of shoeing them out?

 

Lots of Ant powder is about the only thing you can use unless you can find the main nest for the bleeders its very hard to get shot of them

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its too windy and cold for my tomatoes, the charts would have you believe we are in a nice pleasant spell of weather with all that high pressure showing, but in reality my toms have suffered and have gone a bit yellow due to the chilly nights and that vile easterly wind, i covered them last night but the night before last night they got affected, it was mean't to be 8c and it got down to 4c, the GFS mins temp predictions were right many on here say they are wrong that is a myth

Edited by Tony27

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Just mowed the lawn, smells fantastic at this time of the night.. I wonder why?

Edited by Polar Maritime

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Just wondering when the ideal time to buy my orange or lemon tree is?

 

Dunno, but I planted an orange pip at least twenty years ago and it's still going. Many years I've left it out way too late in the season and it's ended up for all intents and puposes, dead. But it's always come back, even though I once had to chop it right down to a stump to remove dead growth. Damn thing looks like a bonsai tree now, and I've yet to get a single orange off it!

 Anyway - advice needed please. This time last year I planted 16 laurel shrubs. Now, about half of them are a picture of health and growing extremely vigourously. The others are struggling very badly and although they have new growth, it's slow and the leaves are very pale and anaemic. What gives?

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That's it,i've had enough. Ants. Had them in a greenhouse for the last 2 years and just about coped ,but this year,the buggars have got a lot worse.

Not to bothered with them eating the odd annual or two,always have to many of them anyway,but this year they are targeting my perennial seedlings.

 

Their final nail in the coffin came yesterday when they ate all but 2 of my rudbechia maxima seedlings,could have cried.Posted Image

 

Question,whats the best way of shoeing them out?

 

If possible, find the nest and administer a kettle of boiling water. If they're not nesting in the greenhouse but coming in through gaps at the bottom, under a threshhold etc then get some sticky fly traps, cut them into strips and lay them on the floor where they come in. But, are you absolutely certain it's Ants eating the seedlings? I've never known it to happen, Woodlice are far more likely to be the culprits, they're easily dealt with by using a liberal dusting of Derris Dust on and around seedlings.

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Dunno, but I planted an orange pip at least twenty years ago and it's still going. Many years I've left it out way too late in the season and it's ended up for all intents and puposes, dead. But it's always come back, even though I once had to chop it right down to a stump to remove dead growth. Damn thing looks like a bonsai tree now, and I've yet to get a single orange off it!

 Anyway - advice needed please. This time last year I planted 16 laurel shrubs. Now, about half of them are a picture of health and growing extremely vigourously. The others are struggling very badly and although they have new growth, it's slow and the leaves are very pale and anaemic. What gives?

 

Sounds like they need a good feed, can't explain why some are good though. Is there a difference in the soil/location between the healthy and the sickly ones? Are the sickly ones exposed to more cold winds than the others? Less Sun, dryer soil?

 

I've got a question for you lot that has me stumped. At work there's a Box parterre, there's 4 quarters, roughly 7 foot between each one. Three of the quarters are happy and healthy, the other one is gradually dying, one plant after another. It's not Box Blight, there's no insect infestation, to all intents and purposes, no difference in conditions for all of the Parterre. Today I was pulling out the dead bushes with the intention of replacing the soil and planting new ones, but I've come to a halt until I can find out what's going on. The soil in the sick quarter has a fine, white covering all over it, it looks like fine sand but has the texture of flour, when I rubbed it between my fingers, it felt wet and slippery, smells like rotting wood. Any ideas?

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Whenever you like, they're usually available all year round. Have a good look around the internet to see which one you fancy the most, or would best suit where you want to grow it. Some varieties are more expensive than others. I'd advise buying the biggest you can afford as they're fairly slow growing and can be slow to fruit. When it arrives it will be in a plastic pot, re-pot it into a terracotta one. The plastic holds the water in, terracotta lets it drain more freely and as they're naturally Mediterranean plants, you want to replicate as much as possible their growing conditions of free draining, gritty soil; impossible in a plastic pot where they're more prone to root rot, especially during the winter months. If you keep it warm all winter, you'll barely need to reduce watering but if you keep it in a cool or unheated room, you must reduce the watering, keeping the soil barely moist.

 

Excellent. How often do i feed them and what do i give them for food.

 

Should i plant them in compost and some grit then.

 

Is it okay for me to cut them say a foot back during the winter.

 

Dunno, but I planted an orange pip at least twenty years ago and it's still going. Many years I've left it out way too late in the season and it's ended up for all intents and puposes, dead. But it's always come back, even though I once had to chop it right down to a stump to remove dead growth. Damn thing looks like a bonsai tree now, and I've yet to get a single orange off it!

 Anyway - advice needed please. This time last year I planted 16 laurel shrubs. Now, about half of them are a picture of health and growing extremely vigourously. The others are struggling very badly and although they have new growth, it's slow and the leaves are very pale and anaemic. What gives?

 

Do you get the flowers?

Edited by summer blizzard

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Do you get the flowers?

 

I got a few flowers in one year,and one year only. Didn't know if you're supposed to help with pollination or whatever - I just left it to its own devices and got no fruit. Looking at the state of it now I might have a long wait before it obliges again!  J - all my laurel shrubs were purchased at the same time from the same place and looked equally healthy. They're all in the same aspect and in fairly close proximity (growing a hedge). I'm gonna give 'em a blast with some high nitrogen feed and see what happens. Could you recommend any,and is there any that are made to be absorbed via foliage? Ta!

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I got a few flowers in one year,and one year only. Didn't know if you're supposed to help with pollination or whatever - I just left it to its own devices and got no fruit. Looking at the state of it now I might have a long wait before it obliges again!  J - all my laurel shrubs were purchased at the same time from the same place and looked equally healthy. They're all in the same aspect and in fairly close proximity (growing a hedge). I'm gonna give 'em a blast with some high nitrogen feed and see what happens. Could you recommend any,and is there any that are made to be absorbed via foliage? Ta!

 

Any chance a dog could be peeing on some of them? Or a Cat spraying?

 

Try this for feeding, can be watered in or sprayed, actually works better as a foliar feed:

 

http://www.austenknapmantools.co.uk/plant-feeds/organic-liquid-seaweed?gclid=CJacwYO8zLcCFRDItAodOWUA0g#.Ua7y19Kshw8

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Excellent. How often do i feed them and what do i give them for food.

 

Should i plant them in compost and some grit then.

 

Is it okay for me to cut them say a foot back during the winter.

 

 

Do you get the flowers?

 

Here's info on compost and pruning: http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/Profile.aspx?pid=94

 

This is the feed I've used in the past, it had good results; had an amazing Orange tree dripping with fruit until the really cold winter a few years ago, killed it stone dead. It had always lived unprotected, in an unheated greenhouse with no ill effect but the frost got it in the end, mind you, the winter that year also shattered the casing on an above ground water pump in the greenhouse too. 

http://www.suttons.co.uk/Gardening/Garden+Equipment/Plant+Food+and+Care/Citrus+Tree+Food_MH2166.htm

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Well after some good growth I suspect its coming to a grinding halt these past two days under these chilly, cloudy conditions.

Most frustrating as really want to put some growth onto everything!

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Can any of you good green-fingered types guide me as to what might have killed off half of my ivy along the front fence please? I'm encouraging the remaining half to go side ways to fill in the gap, but am worried if it's a bug or disease, it will eventually kill the lot off.

 

I though ivy was pretty indestructible?

 

post-6667-0-99656400-1370614374_thumb.jp

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Can any of you good green-fingered types guide me as to what might have killed off half of my ivy along the front fence please? I'm encouraging the remaining half to go side ways to fill in the gap, but am worried if it's a bug or disease, it will eventually kill the lot off.

 

I though ivy was pretty indestructible?

 

Posted ImageJune 2013.jpg

Were there any other symptoms - strange leaf colour, dark patches, wilting, the neighbours having hacked through the main stem, etc - before it died off completely?

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Can any of you good green-fingered types guide me as to what might have killed off half of my ivy along the front fence please? I'm encouraging the remaining half to go side ways to fill in the gap, but am worried if it's a bug or disease, it will eventually kill the lot off.

 

I though ivy was pretty indestructible?

 

Posted ImageJune 2013.jpg

 

The only thing I've ever known to kill Ivy as extensively as that, is cutting through the stem. Can't think of any disease nor pest which would kill it stone dead, over such a large extent, whilst leaving the rest of it untouched.

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The garden at home is enjoying all this recent sunshine, with the bonus of next door having cut down the 3 zillion self sown Ash and Sycamore over the winter, we've actually got sun for most of the day now. I wish you could smell the Rose in the pictures, it fills the garden with it's perfume. It's an old shrub rose, can't remember the name, it spreads by suckers rather like Raspberries, doesn't repeat flower like modern roses but the one display it puts on goes on for weeks and is followed by shiny red hips.

 

post-6280-0-45136000-1370712615_thumb.jppost-6280-0-41828700-1370712660_thumb.jppost-6280-0-03698700-1370712704_thumb.jppost-6280-0-46195600-1370712750_thumb.jppost-6280-0-79118200-1370712797_thumb.jp

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Thanks Pete.

 

A quick tip.....I wanted something 4-5ft tall, either Plum, Burgundy or Magenta to go at the back of the border, between a Black Elder and a William Lobb moss rose trained along the fence - couldn't find anything. So I cheated....I got a Cirsium, right colour and form for the job, but only 2 and a half foot tall, hid an old chimney pot behind the Box bush, filled it with soil and planted it in that. It works a treat and you can't see the chimney pot at all.

 

post-6280-0-05171100-1370716821_thumb.jp

 

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How I'd love to garden, like that!Posted Image 

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How I'd love to garden, like that!Posted Image 

 

It's really easy, you dig a hole and put a plant in, don't be fooled by anyone or anything which tries to make out it's difficult. All you've got to remember is that plants really want to grow, they really want to flower, in order to set seed and reproduce and you've got to work quite hard to stop that happening and kill them. There will be casualties, some plants won't like where you put them or the weather will thwart your dreams, sometimes a pest or disease will get them, but that happens to all gardeners, no matter how much they know or how long they've been doing it. If a plant pegs it, it's not the end of the world and it gives you the opportunity to buy a different one. 

 

I wrote all the horticulture stuff, how to grow, where to grow, when to do what etc for this book, took all the mystery out of it, trying to convince people of just how easy it is to grow stuff. Literally anyone can grow plants, from tiny tots upwards, it seriously isn't difficult. It's an easy to follow instruction manual, I don't benefit financially if you buy it (B&Q own the copy write) you do however get my ugly mug in a couple of the pictures.

 

Get digging!

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Outdoor-Living-Inspirational-Step-step/dp/0953524337

Edited by jethro
It does help if I actually post the link....

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