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Are they the same variety?

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Are they the same variety?

I don't actually know, J...The neighbors gave them to the kids...

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I don't actually know, J...The neighbors gave them to the kids...

 

I suspect they're different varieties with one being more tender than the other. Or it could be that one offered the other, just that little bit more protection. 

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Blueness on a tomato plant could be a loss of nutrient or it may have been in a cold spot..

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Thanks peeps...It could have been a bit of both; the one in the larger pot (okay) was being sheltered by the one in the smaller pot (not okay)...Posted Image

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everything is growing so slowly, the beans are just coming up, the spuds, lettuce, peppers, cucumbers, fennel, and onions are still small, and the tomatoes are still very small, we need an above average june and july for things to catch up, but of course we will probably have another washout summer, then it will be hot in september when the damage will be done, its very frustrating

Edited by Tony27

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Hope you're keeping the fennel away from everything else Tony - that stuff is poisonous to many other crops!

My yard is growing well - toms forming nicely and plants now 5 feet tall.

Peppers/chillies now overgrown their pots so time to go into the greenhouse raised beds this weekend. Lots of good weather coming it seems so should keep growing well.

Potatoes are enormous foliage wise - can't be long now on the earlies.

Must get some pics to show you all.

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Hope you're keeping the fennel away from everything else Tony - that stuff is poisonous to many other crops!My yard is growing well - toms forming nicely and plants now 5 feet tall.Peppers/chillies now overgrown their pots so time to go into the greenhouse raised beds this weekend. Lots of good weather coming it seems so should keep growing well.Potatoes are enormous foliage wise - can't be long now on the earlies.Must get some pics to show you all.

 

Early potatoes are making excellent progress here as well got my out Easter weekend they can't be much more than 3 weeks away now looking at them.

 

The flowers on my strawberries are getting replaced by fruit now so there coming on very nicely

 

Lots of blossom on the Apple tree much than than 12 months ago thats for sure

 

Lettuce is ready and getting picked carrots are ready as well but I'm leaving them a little but longer so they get longer and fatter

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Hope you're keeping the fennel away from everything else Tony - that stuff is poisonous to many other crops!My yard is growing well - toms forming nicely and plants now 5 feet tall.Peppers/chillies now overgrown their pots so time to go into the greenhouse raised beds this weekend. Lots of good weather coming it seems so should keep growing well.Potatoes are enormous foliage wise - can't be long now on the earlies.Must get some pics to show you all.

thanks for that advice, looks like the weather is going to get better at last from tomorrow onwards, it has been too cool and wet for things to grow so far, i don't have a greenhouse, and i don't have much room in my flat to grow things in the warm

Edited by Tony27

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And with this damp and now muggy weather the slugs are out in force. Just removing approx 100 of the things from my small garden. Mostly they were clustered on the decaying tulips so was an easy job to scoop 'em up and throw them away. Glad I happened to be pottering around the garden on an evening like this to catch 'em!

Totally destroyed 3 marigolds to the stems but most veg crops largely unaffected gladly. Hate the things!

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Out of interest how practical would growing an indoor cherry be (obviously put outside after a few years). There's a decent amount of light and obviously no frost but i like the flowers and if it ever produces fruit then that's a bonus.

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Quick question,is it to late to plant butternut squash plants?

Grow courgettes every year and planted them out this evening.

Kicking myself i didn't sow them a few weeks ago.

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Out of interest how practical would growing an indoor cherry be (obviously put outside after a few years). There's a decent amount of light and obviously no frost but i like the flowers and if it ever produces fruit then that's a bonus.

 

I doubt very much whether it would flower indoors unless you gave it a cold, unheated period to mimic winter. Flowers are prompted by the change to increasing temperatures, after a cold, dormant period. Spider Mite could be a problem too. Other than that, give it a go and see what happens.

Quick question,is it to late to plant butternut squash plants?

Grow courgettes every year and planted them out this evening.

Kicking myself i didn't sow them a few weeks ago.

 

Not at all. They germinate quickly, especially if kept warm. As they don't start cropping until the back end of the summer, you've got plenty of time for them to grow. 

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Don't know if you've been here but if you're into Wisteria, this garden is a must. Some are trained as standard trees, they're absolutely stunning.

 

http://www.ifordmanor.co.uk/garden.html

 

http://www.flickr.com/groups/ifordmanor/pool/

 

No, we haven't so thank you. Will have to check that out next year.

Ours has got a little damp this week, but it's still doing OK.

 

post-7340-0-17293700-1370015288_thumb.jp

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I doubt very much whether it would flower indoors unless you gave it a cold, unheated period to mimic winter. Flowers are prompted by the change to increasing temperatures, after a cold, dormant period. Spider Mite could be a problem too. Other than that, give it a go and see what happens.

 

Not at all. They germinate quickly, especially if kept warm. As they don't start cropping until the back end of the summer, you've got plenty of time for them to grow. 

 

How long a period and how cold would that have to be?

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How long a period and how cold would that have to be?

 

Minimum of three months. The easiest option would be to put it outside for the Autumn/Winter but I'm guessing if you had a garden to do that, you wouldn't be trying to grow it indoors?? Bonsai trees, which is really what it would be if grown long term in a pot, generally live outside all year round. Can I persuade you to swap the Cherry for a Lemon/Orange tree? They happily grow indoors all year round in a pot, will flower and fruit if fed correctly. The perfume from Lemon/Orange tree blossom is wonderful and you get the bonus of edible fruit too which happily stays on the plant for months without rotting. The special food is available on-line, you need two sorts, winter and summer feed, it's no more expensive than any other plant food.

 

Spider Mite can be a problem with citrus too.

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Minimum of three months. The easiest option would be to put it outside for the Autumn/Winter but I'm guessing if you had a garden to do that, you wouldn't be trying to grow it indoors?? Bonsai trees, which is really what it would be if grown long term in a pot, generally live outside all year round. Can I persuade you to swap the Cherry for a Lemon/Orange tree? They happily grow indoors all year round in a pot, will flower and fruit if fed correctly. The perfume from Lemon/Orange tree blossom is wonderful and you get the bonus of edible fruit too which happily stays on the plant for months without rotting. The special food is available on-line, you need two sorts, winter and summer feed, it's no more expensive than any other plant food.

 

Spider Mite can be a problem with citrus too.

 

That's a good idea actually.

 

Would they be fine with say a 5-25C temperature range?

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As a life-long admirer of the humble lupine, I found this a particularly fascinating article: http://www.hortmag.com/archive/return_of_the_russell_lupines

Blimey!you tend to forget the amount of time and effort that goes into hybridising plants.

 

We grow hundreds of 'Russel Hybrid Lupins' at the nursery every year and I've never really thought about who bred them, even though I've grown thousands over the years.

 

Brilliant article! :-)

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That's a good idea actually.

 

Would they be fine with say a 5-25C temperature range?

 

Absolutely fine for them. They like hot, dislike below freezing point, are really easy to grow, not particularly pest prone except for Spider Mite, live for ever if looked after and just get better and better with time. The perfume from the flowers is heavenly, it really does fill the room.

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Last year I did report (but can't find the post) that a citrus and a clementine tree in my French garden were suffering from a leaf malformation, the citrus being the worst, so we cut out all the branches with affected leaves.

 

Coming back this spring there has been lots of new growth but no flowers but otherwise appears fairly healthy - Hopefully it may start to flower and fruit next year - I love lemons.

 

in respect of the clementine - this had fewer affected leaves but we took those off last autumn - this spring there has been some new growth and a number of yellow flowers, so I am in hopes that fruit will develop. Some of the leaves were curled up to form cocoons, so I took these to a gardening centre and they suggested that it was as the result of small parasitic insects and recommend a spray - I have sprayed this now and taken off the affected leaves - the tree is still quite bunched up but I am minded to leave it like that for the moment and see if we can give it some judicious pruning to spread the branches out a bit more in the autumn or next spring after any possible fruit has developed and ripened, so fingers crossed with this one.

 

We now have a red vine and a white vine, the red vine is coming up for some 30 months and is showing a good deal of fruit. We are coming back for a family gathering for the last week in August so hoping some will be ripe enough to eat.

 

The white vine, a muscat, which has now been in our garden for some 18 months is showing the start of a reasonable harvest but there were blobs on some of the leaves - I took samples of these also to the gardening centre and was advised that the culprit was a fungus, quite common in this neck of the woods and was advised to spray with copper sulphate. I have now done this and hopefully I can get it done at fortnightly intervals until the end of July, so here's to hoping this will cure that problem. I also sprayed the red vine, just in case, though it is not yet showing symptoms. 

 

Meanwhile the olive tree we planted is growing into a right hooligan, it has virtually doubled in size since it was planted 30 months ago and the branches are festooned with 'baby' olives.

 

This brings me to the point that when they are ready what the hell do you do with them - they taste awful if you eat them straight off the tree but I understand that they should be marinated in a solution of bicarbonate of soda for about 3 sessions of 24 hours each, then they can be preserved in a brine solution. Bearing in mind the way osmosis works I take it the care should be taken to ensure that the solutions are not too strong, otherwise they could end up having the juice sucked out of them and ending up shrivelled.

 

As for watering we have an automatic watering system using what they call 'Eau de Canal' strictly none potable since all sorts of effluent are discharged into the canal from the pleasure boats but I don't expect the plants will complain - really it's a constant source of fertiliser. However the two citrus trees are not privy to this supply but I understand that if they put their roots down far enough they can withstand the summer droughts we get down here.

 

This Mediterranean gardening is a steep learning curve, so if anyone has some useful information I would appreciate it.

Edited by mike Meehan
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i planted my toms on friday and they didn't die this time despite it actually being colder on friday night than it was the night i planted the ones that died three weeks ago, they are very very small, and we need two weeks of light winds and no rain because they are very delicate, it's probably too late for them now to be ready in time before the autumn kicks in, but i am targeting the 1st october for them to be ready, it will be sods law if we get a freak frost in september

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Dug my first potatoes today, and having them for dinner. Charlotte, a second early, has beaten my first early, International Kidney!

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i planted my toms on friday and they didn't die this time despite it actually being colder on friday night than it was the night i planted the ones that died three weeks ago, they are very very small, and we need two weeks of light winds and no rain because they are very delicate, it's probably too late for them now to be ready in time before the autumn kicks in, but i am targeting the 1st october for them to be ready, it will be sods law if we get a freak frost in september

 

As they're small, they would probably benefit from a couple of layers of horticultural fleece loosely wrapped around them for a couple of weeks - it makes a huge difference. It's also very handy if any sudden frosts are forecast. Available from all garden centres.

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This warmth is doing the garden the world of good long may it continue

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