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Bottesford

Net Weather Gardening Thread

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Potash, potash, potash.... and trim it to 3 buds in the winter.

Pop up the road to Charlton jy, I reckon ours are going to be awesome this year.

Last year they were destroyed by a freezing May, but this year they're playing catch-up and are full of buds.

Ultimately I think it's down to the original plant, but happy to be overruled on that one.

 

Don't know if you've been here but if you're into Wisteria, this garden is a must. Some are trained as standard trees, they're absolutely stunning.

 

http://www.ifordmanor.co.uk/garden.html

 

http://www.flickr.com/groups/ifordmanor/pool/

Edited by jethro

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Thanks for the tips,as for feeding i dont feed it an awful lot,but its sandy soil,dont know if its an issue,it gets full sun in the afternoon,but is shaded for a good part of the day,so perhaps thats an issue,jtay my friends own Alderholt Mill,the Wisteria there is fabulous.

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Was really hoping to move some veg off the windowsill into the garden today but now the forecast for this week is looking much cooler, cloudier with the chance of frost later. Are we ever going to get a decent spell of weather?!

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Was really hoping to move some veg off the windowsill into the garden today but now the forecast for this week is looking much cooler, cloudier with the chance of frost later. Are we ever going to get a decent spell of weather?!

 

Quite possible yes http://forum.netweather.tv/topic/75951-met-office-16-to-30-day-outlook/?p=2698090

 

Posted Image

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Total disaster this year, my tomatoes got to big so i had to put them out 2 weeks ago and then of course we had a frost and they all died, my Lettuce, beans and peppers died in the cold too, i reseeded everything 2 weeks ago and nothing has come up yet, i put some more tomatoes seeds straight in the ground at my allotment yesterday, but i doubt they will germinate as it is going to be cold yet again this week and it is probably too late for toms now

 

I have a few onions and a few spuds coming through but overall it might be a write off again this year as it was last year due to the cold wet weather we had, my allotment is almost empty when usually by now there would be lots of things in it

 

i think there is more chance of veg surviving in november than in may, we seem to get more mild nights then than we do in may

Edited by Tony27

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Got my toms out to the greenhouse this weekend - all now setting fruit and looking good (especially on their bi-weekly seaweed foliar feed!).

French beans potted up and leaving them out tonight as its so nice & warm but no doubt bringing them in later in the week. 

Forecast of cold is a worry although I very much doubt we'll see a frost - just don't want sub 5c temps popping up slowing everything down.

Potatoes (in bags) look like a giant forest of leaves so certainly doing well at the moment!

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I wish the prospect of cold nights would clear off, really need to get my Runner Beans out but daren't risk it at the mo. All you weather geeks/chart reading types, is there any prospect of warmer nights in the foreseeable?

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Question for the more experienced gardeners amongst you.This is the third year I have attempted to grow Leeks, in the previous two years i have sown seed and they have germinated, grown to about 4-5 inches high but remained very thin. The books say to transplant when they get to pencil sized thickness however they don't seem to grown any bigger and i have transplanted them anyway, making a hole with a dibber placing them in and watering in. Eventually  they get slightly thicker than a pencil but no more.This year again they have grown to about 4/5 inches but are still spindly thin,  can i transplant them regardless but again why are they not 'fattening' up? 

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Attempted to prick-out some more lupins today; but fingers got too cold...

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Question for the more experienced gardeners amongst you.This is the third year I have attempted to grow Leeks, in the previous two years i have sown seed and they have germinated, grown to about 4-5 inches high but remained very thin. The books say to transplant when they get to pencil sized thickness however they don't seem to grown any bigger and i have transplanted them anyway, making a hole with a dibber placing them in and watering in. Eventually  they get slightly thicker than a pencil but no more.This year again they have grown to about 4/5 inches but are still spindly thin,  can i transplant them regardless but again why are they not 'fattening' up? 

 

Leeks are best transplanted out in June when they are around 20cm (8in) high and the thickness of a pencil when transplanted out its best to get a hole around 15cm (6inches) deep and place one leek per hole never back fill this hole with soil simply just fill the hole with water and let it settle its self over time.

 

Leeks also like plenty of compost or well-rotted manure digging in to the patch where you will grow then in the autumn.

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Leeks are best transplanted out in June when they are around 20cm (8in) high and the thickness of a pencil when transplanted out its best to get a hole around 15cm (6inches) deep and place one leek per hole never back fill this hole with soil simply just fill the hole with water and let it settle its self over time. Leeks also like plenty of compost or well-rotted manure digging in to the patch where you will grow then in the autumn.

Thanks for the reply, I'll make sure I dig in plenty of rotted manure which I haven't done for them before and if that doesn't work I will have to accept growing leeks isn't for me! Shame as they are the only things that just haven't worked at all in all we have attempted.

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Thanks for the reply, I'll make sure I dig in plenty of rotted manure which I haven't done for them before and if that doesn't work I will have to accept growing leeks isn't for me! Shame as they are the only things that just haven't worked at all in all we have attempted.

 

Also try to feed them once a week every 2 weeks if you can with some Miracle-Gro Plant Food http://www.amazon.co.uk/Miracle-Gro-Purpose-Soluble-Plant-Food/dp/B000TAP7PY/ref=sr_1_2?s=outdoors&ie=UTF8&qid=1369169276&sr=1-2&keywords=miracle+gro

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The garden at home is coming on a treat now the Sun's out and it's got some warmth to it, not looking forward to the likelihood of cooler weather incoming. My hardy geraniums are certainly enjoying the Sun, the Purple leaved Cow Parsley is shoving it's way through the undergrowth and the Black Parrot Tulips have finally come out too.

 

post-6280-0-16956600-1369241743_thumb.jppost-6280-0-87700600-1369241791_thumb.jppost-6280-0-52600400-1369241859_thumb.jppost-6280-0-34940700-1369241914_thumb.jppost-6280-0-73328700-1369241999_thumb.jppost-6280-0-57269700-1369242049_thumb.jppost-6280-0-74681300-1369242097_thumb.jppost-6280-0-28872200-1369242146_thumb.jp

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Its getting chilly out there right now, could be a cold one tonight, i hope my veg will survive the night

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Morning all, would just like to sing the praises of the Laburnum, wish I had a pound for every time you hear 'it's all poisonous even the flowers' but at this time of year when garden colour is in short supply it  is really in its element. Just to the right I also have a young Beech tree which is just about breaking into bud, it's never early but looks like it will make it into June without being fully in leaf this year.

 

Posted Imagemay lab 001.JPG Posted Imagemay lab 003.JPG

 

I have a pond also in this position which both the laburnum and two holly trees overhang, neither of these seem to cause any problems to the fish which have all survived and flourished over the past few winters.

 

Posted Imagemay lab 002.JPG

 

Not great weather to come over the next couple of days here but water butts will greatly appreciate a top up from the rain but I don't think the Delphiniums are going to like the strong winds though.

 

Happy pottering!

Those are lovely pics - you have a wonderful garden to do some 'pottering' inPosted Image

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Flowers on the potatoes! Oddly, the flowers on the second earlies are appearing before the first earlies — I don't think I've ever seen that before. Looks like a good set on the plums and cherries this year too, and the apple trees are laden with blossom — hopefully, the cold won't ruin them.

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All the lilac bushes are well-loaded this year...Cold weather I guess?

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Morning all, would just like to sing the praises of the Laburnum, wish I had a pound for every time you hear 'it's all poisonous even the flowers' but at this time of year when garden colour is in short supply it  is really in its element. Just to the right I also have a young Beech tree which is just about breaking into bud, it's never early but looks like it will make it into June without being fully in leaf this year.

 

 

Happy pottering!

 

I'm with you all the way on Laburnum trees, they're stunning when covered with blossom and sadly, no longer planted very often. Perhaps we should start a campaign to make it fashionable again?

 

The Laburnum walk planted by Rosemary Verey at Barnsley House in Gloucestershire, is IMO simply stunning. The best use ever of this much maligned tree.

 

http://www.crownhotelbassett.co.uk/_images/barnsley_house_garden1.jpg

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Why do people not plant it anymore? Surely it doesn't matter if its poisonous or not if you don't eat it.

We had one in the garden when I was a kid and it did look good. And no one got poisoned nor did I see a wasteland of poisoned animals and plants around it...

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I think it's a combination of safety issues and fashion. When I was a kid we wandered at will during the holidays, climbed trees and fell out of them, generally mucked around without adult supervision, nowadays kids generally aren't allowed to do that for fear of what might happen to them - the world has got ever more protective, mostly on the basis of 'just in case' and the same rule has been applied to poisonous plants like Laburnum. Plus the popularity of plants does rise and fall, gardening is subject to fashions in same way as clothing is. It tends to be driven by big shows like Chelsea, a few designers pick up on a slightly different plant, it gets featured on the TV, and in the blink of an eye, garden centres are full of them because they know they can sell them on the back of the Chelsea factor. A few years back it was Alliums, rarely seen in a garden before, now they're everywhere. 

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The apple trees around my area are full of blossom this year and I mean full last year they were almost bare but this year is shaping up to be a good one for Apples looking at the amount of blossom on the trees

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Same here but it's all getting blown off today, looks like snow's falling.

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Glad I put the toms and strawberry trough in the brick SH ....Shed along with the hanging basket.. the big pot on the lawn got blown over so moved it into a safe position.. Very strong gusts no good this time of year...

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disgusting vile day out there, there is no hope of anything growing in this weather my seeds have probably been washed away, if we have this kind of weather quite often in the next month that will be another year written off for some of the veg

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A quick question...I have two tomato plants (from the same source) that have been outside, in pots, for the past month...Despite being so close to one another that they are entwined, one has gone blue whilst the other is thriving...Any ideas, Dr Stefan?

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