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Following on from my post at the end of last week regarding the lettuce in the B&Q compost - http://forum.netweather.tv/topic/73128-net-weather-gardening-thread/?p=2679710 - I watered in some fish, blood and bone food last Thursday and they have really picked up now almost at the same level now as those in the miracle grow compost

 

Could really do with some April showers now I have 4 water butts connected to the 2 greenhouses which hold a total of 570 liters of water I'm now down to 330 liters which is getting lower each day

Edited by Gavin.
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It's been a glorious, Spring like day today, spent most of it sowing seeds and marking out a new flower bed. The new bed will be eleven and a half foot wide by just over sixty foot long, fronted by a

This is a bit of a bugbear of mine so if I slip into rant mode, I apologise now.   Titchmarsh is right, gardeners are universally regarded as too thick to do anything else, the public perception is a

The Pergola is up, the digging is all done, the gravel is spread and the massive tree has had a trim to expose the trunk and let some light through ; all that's left to do is plant it up and pray for

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Hi Suburban Streamer, I think your rose will be fine, looking at the size of it, it should have an extensive root system! When you do take a rose back down to woody stems, it can take a while for shoots to penetrate the bark, this is why they get so tall and woody in the first place with all the growth generally coming from the softer bark at the the top of the bush, if it does die back I am sure it will put shoots out from the bottom but it may take time as it has had a bit of a shock.  As Jethro said that are generally pretty difficult to kill.  If it doesn't survive a new rambler would soon re-establish I'm sure. The old saying about never put a new rose in the same hole as the old one, does have some credence in my experience, so if you do plant a new one, would suggest you move the position slightly and keep it well fed in the first year as well as well watered as I am sure it is dry under that old tree. Might even be worth putting in a new rambler in as well as an each way bet.

 

Hope this helps. Posted Image

 

hi bjaykent thanks for the advice Posted Image

i have good news...  i found some swelling in two areas of the thick bark where i'm pretty sure some shoots will be evident very soon Posted Image one "shoot" is right at the base which is exactly what i was hoping for.  i have also planted another rose - Aloha - behind Kiftsgate so hopefully the huge empty space left after losing the plum tree and the rose will soon be filled Posted Image

I had not heard of the saying about never planting a rose in the same hole, i'll bear that in mind in the future Posted Image

Edited by Suburban Streamer
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The Spring flowers are certainly enjoying the recent warmth and sunshine, my Primroses, Primula's and Pulmonarias are in full swing now. The multi coloured patch have all self seeded into the edge of the lawn, I know lawn purists will probably have a heart attack but I like flowers dotted through mine and afterall, this is home, not work so I can do as I please.

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hi bjaykent thanks for the advice Posted Image

i have good news...  i found some swelling in two areas of the thick bark where i'm pretty sure some shoots will be evident very soon Posted Image one "shoot" is right at the base which is exactly what i was hoping for.  i have also planted another rose - Aloha - behind Kiftsgate so hopefully the huge empty space left after losing the plum tree and the rose will soon be filled Posted Image

I had not heard of the saying about never planting a rose in the same hole, i'll bear that in mind in the future Posted Image

Yay! - that's great news, and you haven't had to wait too long eitherPosted Image  I guess the arrival of Spring like temperatures will now help this process along even betterPosted Image

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Ah gardening is so much more satisfying when things are growing!

All my winter veg crops that have literally sat since October without growing (and looking very sad in some cases) are growing like crazy. Had some lovely salad leaves from mizuna, rocket and mustard plants; had a tasty pak choi and rainbow chard in a stir fry. The kale plants seem to be doubled in size every week and the broccoli has a nice head forming.

The cabbages have suffered with lack of light and have very long bendy stems and struggle to stand upright. Might attempt to rebury some of them deeper although I may just forget it and harvest what I can as am running out of space now!

 

Proper spring weather really is the best time of year in the garden!

 

My pak chois:

post-94-0-30733900-1366053199_thumb.jpg

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Slugs hate garlic. I make up a solution with a load of old cloves of garlic (which are past their best for cooking/eating purposes) and thouroughly crush them up into a filled watering can and leave to infuse for a while. Then i regularly go round the planting areas and do a combined watering and slug repellant session all in one go.  It doesn't kill them, but for sure it keeps them away from susceptible plants and vegetables.Posted Image

 

You could of course placed throughtly sliced up cloves of garlic around your plants and veg, but there are obvious time-consuming and impractical drawbacks to this procedure. The watering method is more economical anyway

Edited by Tamara Road
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Apparently they don't like broken egg shells either again it doesn't kill them but it stops the getting at your veg as they are too sharp for them

 

The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) recommends you just kill them

 

The RHS recommends various ways of tackling the invasion, including using nematodes, microscopic worms which can be watered over the garden, infect the slugs and kill them.

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I'm using nematodes and watered them in just over a week ago into the whole garden/beds and some pots.

They don't kill snails however so I'm manually removing them as I see them. Hopefully they'll destroy less of my crops this year!

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i dont use anything to deter/kill slugs, i just pop out every evening around 11pm and manually remove them. I only do this for about a month when my vegetables/plants are very young and it seems to do the trick.  last year was the first year that they got the better of me, just SO many - i really hope we dont have that many this year or i might have to resort to mass murder :p

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Anyone know much about bottom watering pot plants?

I've got my 5" pots in saucers and someone said I should put water into the saucer and let the soil take it up. This then avoids wetting the foliage (which I know peppers don't like).

Thing is I do this and on the first fill the water is taken up fast. I then refill again as it is obviously not yet enough water... then some of it goes. But after that it just sits in a saucer of water leaving them vulnerable to root rot.

The top is still bone dry and I don't know how far the water has gone.

Any thoughts?

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Anyone know much about bottom watering pot plants?I've got my 5" pots in saucers and someone said I should put water into the saucer and let the soil take it up. This then avoids wetting the foliage (which I know peppers don't like).Thing is I do this and on the first fill the water is taken up fast. I then refill again as it is obviously not yet enough water... then some of it goes. But after that it just sits in a saucer of water leaving them vulnerable to root rot.The top is still bone dry and I don't know how far the water has gone.Any thoughts?

You're better off plunging them into a bucket of water, right up over the top of the soil. Wait until the air bubbles stop coming up then remove and drain. You'll have to water them far less often and they won't be sat in water.
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i dont use anything to deter/kill slugs, i just pop out every evening around 11pm and manually remove them. I only do this for about a month when my vegetables/plants are very young and it seems to do the trick.  last year was the first year that they got the better of me, just SO many - i really hope we dont have that many this year or i might have to resort to mass murder Posted Image

Well notwithstanding the other methods of control suggested, Jan and I could hire you then to commit hari kari on our slugs too when we are not watching as neither of us can bring ourselves to kill themPosted Image

 

Btw - if you remove them and don't appear to kill then...then what do you do instead with them?Posted Image Posted Image

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Well notwithstanding the other methods of control suggested, Jan and I could hire you then to commit hari kari on our slugs too when we are not watching as neither of us can bring ourselves to kill themPosted Image

 

Btw - if you remove them and don't appear to kill then...then what do you do instead with them?Posted Image Posted Image

Eat them?

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Well notwithstanding the other methods of control suggested, Jan and I could hire you then to commit hari kari on our slugs too when we are not watching as neither of us can bring ourselves to kill themPosted Image

 

Btw - if you remove them and don't appear to kill then...then what do you do instead with them?Posted Image Posted Image

 

Take a flexible ruler and twang them into next-door's garden?

Edited by Crepuscular Ray
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Eat them?

You already confessed to that in the secrets thread. This is a botany lesson on here and not a hold-upPosted Image  Or is/was that to do with lupins?..I can never rememberPosted Image

Edited by Tamara Road
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A good old snail pie.

Yum!Posted Image Except that they are slugs. which make them even less yum...(probably)...Posted Image

 

Getting back on topic... I have my extended patio being completed this weekend and that means I can relieve the pressure of garden furniture currently stacked outside my patio with the extra space that will be created. I can also complete furnishing my alpine rockery which borders the end of the patio towards the garden ponds where space has also been a premium Posted Image  And finally, it means I can also give my beautiful Camellia Oleifera and two Azaleas the space they need to be seen properly in the border beside the front pond without any of the aforementioned blockages in the way spoiling the view Posted Image The Camellia already has a profusion of pink/red buds ready to burst open in the coming weeks, and the Azaleas are always a gorgeous show of colour in the early summerPosted Image

 

So Spring is an exciting time of year with the long days and evenings ahead to enjoy outdoors at last in the garden. Like a reward for being able to use a room extended out of the house that remains unoccupied for several dark and wet months of the yearPosted Image

Edited by Tamara Road
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Had a great day in the garden today, repaired some fencing and trellis, did some weeding, moved loads of forget-me-nots which always self seed right on the edge of borders. Put down weed and feed on grass last week which combined with the warm weather has made for some very lush growth, really want to cut it but need to wait a few days yet.

 

Gave the pond a bit of a tidy, cleared out the filter and removed some duck weed, all the fish looking healthy after the long winter and there's plenty of frog spawn. Had to renew the netting after my westie decided to walk over it recentlyPosted Image , it is essential here next to the marsh, lots of herons here all the time with the largest heronry in the UK nearby at Northward Hill.

 

Magnolia buds almost ready to burst open, they are already 5 weeks later than last year, plenty of flower seedlings on the go now for the hanging baskets and borders but looks as if I will have to move them from the greenhouse into the conservatory before the weekend with the threat of night frost returning.

 

Can't wait for summer now, happy gardening!Posted Image  

You've been a busy boy!Posted Image I saw definite movement in one of my little ponds on Sunday. Usually there are frogs and newts in there - I love having a garden that supports wildlife (of the non destructive kind!)Posted Image The ponds are too small to support fish however - but there are tropical fish indoors anyway. And here the issue would be seagulls plus two very curious cats who seem quite comfortable with water and adept with scooping paws!

 

I do wonder if the lateness of the season may have some benefits in terms of giving us flower displays during the even longer days and evenings when we are able to spend more and more time enjoying it all. Good things come to those who wait as the saying goesPosted Image

 

I'm going to wait a little while longer before attending to my hanging baskets and tubs, although I will put my over wintered Geraniums outside against the sheltered wall of the conservatory very soon I think.

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