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Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Mild & wet then colder and drier at times

    _________________________________

    Monday 21 December – Wednesday 27 January

    Windy, wet and mild at first, becoming colder

    Eastern Scotland will be drier but low pressure systems will bring rain and increasing winds across Wales, Northern Ireland and England on Sunday night and Monday, clearing eastwards through the day. Tuesday 22nd will be drier with some sunshine and just a few scattered showers. Eastern areas should be mostly dry.

    Overnight and into Wednesday 23rd a rather deep low pressure system will cross England and Wales with strong winds and some heavy rain. Snow will mix in over Scotland and northern England, mainly higher ground. Colder air will follow Wednesday night and Christmas Eve, with north to northwest winds bringing showers to Scotland, eastern England, west Wales and Cornwall. Some of these will be wintry but mainly for Scotland and northeast England. Much of the country will have plenty of dry and sunny weather.

    The chances of snow on Christmas Day are looking low for most places as winds slowly back more westerly, making the day a little less chilly. Rain will move in, not reaching the southeast until later in the day or into the night. Showers will follow over Scotland, which might see the only snow of the day over higher elevations.

    For Boxing Day and December 27th, a large low pressure from the northwest could bring strong winds and rain everywhere, some heavy. It will drag colder air across around its northern side, with rain turning to snow over Scotland, even down to quite low levels, on Boxing Day, and then to the hills and mountains of England and Wales on the 27th.

    Monday 28 December – Sunday 3 January

    Unsettled and mild then drier and colder

    There is a lot of uncertainty through this period as atmospheric patterns shift. It looks likely that milder air will move in around December 28th and 29th but this will be accompanied by periods of rain and increased winds as a frontal systems pass across the UK. Some wintry precipitation will be possible over the higher ground in Scotland but elsewhere mild enough even to avoid frost in most places.

    These lows should shift away southeast and eastwards, inducing colder flows from a northwesterly direction on the 30th and into New Year's Eve. This is also partly due to high pressure west of the UK, and this will maintain these chilly flows from the northwest through the New Year into the first week of January. However, no deep cold is expected, with temperatures just a little below normal. It should become drier for most areas through this period but a few showers will be possible, chiefly for northern and western areas.

    Any showers could be wintry over higher ground in Wales, Northern Ireland and Northern Ireland, and perhaps at lower levels in Scotland from time to time. There looks to be little chance of any strong winds. Although this is the most likely development, models diverge and there could be threats of stronger cold with winds from the north or northeast, which would bring sleet or snow showers to Scotland and eastern England were this to develop.

    Monday 4 January – Sunday 17 January

    Becoming milder, wetter and windier

    The latest long range forecast is indicating another change. There has been a persistent block of high pressure over Scandinavia and western Russia, and this has stopped Atlantic low pressure systems taking a path in that direction. Models are now suggesting that this high pressure will finally erode. What might that mean for the weather? Well, with that block out of the way, low pressure systems will be less constrained and there will most likely be a train of them setting up on a track from the Atlantic, across or near the UK and towards Norway.

    This should mean unsettled but milder weather with periods of rain and potentially strong winds as these lows pass by. Any colder and drier interludes between systems should be transient but could produce sleet and snow showers temporarily in northern areas. It looks at the moment like there will not be any sustained dry periods but it also means there should be fewer chances of frost than usual. We are keeping an eye on the Stratospheric Polar Vortex. If this weakens it can allow colder air to flood southwards, although there is no guarantee at the moment on exactly where in the Northern Hemisphere that might be.

    It would bring a greater chance of colder weather to the UK and there is a slight risk of this happening by mid-January, although later January and into February would bring more of a risk.

    Further ahead

    How will the Polar Vortex influence the January forecast?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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    With state of the art technology and the latest info available at the flick of a switch I fail to see why the public should have to put up with out of date forecasts. In this fast moving situation its

    I've only gone and done it. This went to the Press Complaints Commission this morning....         1i) The Press must take care not to publish inaccurate, misleading or distorted information, including

    Some more images from London this morning  

    Posted Images

    Posted
  • Location: Hoyland,barnsley,south yorkshire(100m asl)
  • Weather Preferences: severe storms,snow wind and ice
  • Location: Hoyland,barnsley,south yorkshire(100m asl)
    WWW.BBC.CO.UK

    Snow features in the forecast, but will it arrive in time for Christmas Day? Matt Taylor has the details.

    ☺️

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    Posted
  • Location: Elstow, Bedford
  • Weather Preferences: Deep cold
  • Location: Elstow, Bedford

    Only in the Daily Express!https://www.express.co.uk/news/weather/1375718/UK-long-range-forecast-snow-radar-cold-weather-map-met-office-warning-BBC-weather-latest

     

    never mind running down Rotherham high street nekkid, this would be an NW streak rofl

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Colder more often. Sleet and snow at times.

    _________________________________

    Wednesday 23 December – Sunday 27 December

    Unsettled and turning colder. A short dry spell

    On Wednesday, there will be a marked divide in temperature across the UK. Highs of 11-13C across southern England, but from the Midlands northwards, highs of 4-8C will be more typical. Parts of northern Scotland will only see maxima of 2 or 3C. A low pressure area and frontal zone will intensify across southern areas. Widespread rain from northern England southwards, becoming heavy and prolonged over mid and south Wales, the Midlands, East Anglia and parts of southern England during the afternoon and Wednesday night.

    More than 50mm of rain may fall in less than 24 hours in places, bringing a risk of flooding. Strong north-easterly winds across the south of the UK on Wednesday night, as the low clears. 50-60mph gusts over SW England. A much colder day on Thursday (Christmas Eve), with a fresh northerly wind. Sunny spells widespread, especially over inland parts of the UK. Northern, western and eastern coastal counties will have a scattering of wintry showers. A widespread and sharp frost on Christmas Eve night. Christmas Day will be cold, but largely dry and fine over England and Wales. East Anglia and Lincolnshire could catch a wintry shower. Cloud will increase over Wales and northern England during the afternoon.

    Turning windier and less cold over Scotland, with spells of rain moving in later. The weekend will see a deepening area of low pressure pushing southwards. Milder for a time on Saturday, with strong westerly winds and widespread heavy rain. By Sunday, the colder air will return from the north-west, with showers falling increasingly as hail, sleet and even some snow over the hills. Winds not as strong on Sunday. Further wintry showers on Sunday night, with a frost and a high risk of ice on untreated surfaces.
    Snow may fall and settle in some northern and western areas on Sunday night.

    Monday 28 December – Sunday 3 January

    Often cold and unsettled. Snow for some of us!

    Since our previous update, the recent model guidance has trended towards predicting a cold and unsettled spell of weather for many days of this week. The jet stream will take an extremely meandering track across the north Atlantic and western Europe, arcing northwards to form a persistent high pressure ridge over the central north Atlantic.
    However, on the eastern side of this high pressure the jet stream is expected to dip well to the south, plunging down over western France, Spain and Portugal to the western Mediterranean. This pattern will steer several low pressure areas south over the UK. This will allow cold air from Iceland, Greenland and even deeper into the Arctic to flow southwards over the UK, in the wake of these systems.

    A combination of cold and unsettled weather in mid-winter means that sleet and snow will be on the cards for some of us, even over some lower lying areas! Fronts pushing south-eastwards are most likely to bring snow to some of the hiller parts of the UK, where a covering of snow will build up during the week. At low-levels, it is more likely to be a very fine balance between rain, sleet and snow, with the detail very challenging. Shorter range forecasts will add the crucial detail as we get nearer the time. There will be some sharp frosts on a few nights during this week, especially where snow is lying on the ground, with winds falling light and skies clearing. Patchy freezing fog could also be a hazard, too. A very high risk of ice on untreated roads and pavements, especially after all the wet weather that we have seen in mid-December. But between the fronts and especially across inland and southern parts of England and Wales, there will be some decent sunny spells on a few days.

    Monday 4 January – Sunday 17 January

    The cold weather pattern continuing for a while

    Since last Friday's update, the latest long range forecast models have trended colder for the first half of January, especially the week of Monday 4th to Sunday 10th.
    It seems increasingly likely that the low pressure track will still be displaced to the south of the UK, while high pressure intensifies to the north, near Iceland and Greenland.
    This pressure pattern will cause the winds over the UK to blow from the north quite regularly, feeding in air from the Arctic and cutting off our normally mild south-westerly winds.

    What is causing this weather pattern? We need to look across to the Pacific Ocean and a huge and persistent area of low pressure over the far northern Pacific. There is a strong jet stream associated with this low pressure area too - a narrow ribbon of high altitude wind, blowing from west to east. As this jet stream reaches the strong north-south barrier of the Rocky Mountains, it sets up a weaker and more wavy jet stream downstream over the USA, North Atlantic and into Europe. This is leading to the colder weather patterns over the UK western Europe.

    Therefore we should expect more chilly weather with some sleet and snow in places, especially over central and northern areas of the UK and over the hills. But even the south will be at risk of some snow, along with some rain and sleet. Drier days too, with sharp night frosts. By mid-January it may become a little milder in the south at times, with widespread rain and brisk winds, as the low pressure track starts to shift a bit further north again. The northern half of the UK is more likely to stay on the chilly side, with upland snowfall still a threat.

    Further ahead

    As a more sustained period of cold weather appears to be on the way, we will give more the detail on snow risk. We will also assess if there is a chance that milder air could return to the south during early January.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    UK flooding: Billing Aquadrome park in Northampton evacuated


    "More than 1,000 people are being evacuated from a flooded holiday park. Occupants of 500 caravans have been forced to leave the Billing Aquadrome park in Northampton, where heavy rain left water up to 5ft (1.5m) deep. Police, who were helped by firefighters and lowland search and rescue teams, said some of those stranded were suffering from hypothermia.

    At least two leisure centres in Northampton are set to be turned into emergency accommodation. Residents have been told to find accommodation with friends and family where possible, and assured that they would not be breaching Covid-19 regulations in such "exceptional circumstances".

    However Ch Supt Mick Stamper, of Northamptonshire Police, urged people to avoid homes where others are shielding or self-isolating. "This is an exceptionally challenging situation and emergency services, working with partners and volunteers working flat out to resolve the situation and safeguard those affected on site," he said."

     

    _116244548_mediaitem116244544.jpg
    WWW.BBC.CO.UK

    Occupants of about 500 caravans at Billing Aquadrome in Northampton are urged to seek shelter.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    It's officially a White Christmas after snowfall in East Yorkshire and Suffolk

    "Early snowfall in East Yorkshire and Suffolk has made 2020 a White Christmas for parts of the UK. The Met Office reported snow on the ground at 5am on Christmas Day in Leconfield, East Yorkshire and Wattisham in Suffolk .

    It tweeted: "Morning everyone, we've just had official confirmation that this #Christmas is a white one! "Leconfield in Humberside reported #snow falling at 5am, and Wattisham in Suffolk also reported recent snow at this time. Further updates will be issued as they become available."

     

    skynews-snow-hessle-east-yorkshire_52184
    NEWS.SKY.COM

    Snow was reported in Leconfield and Wattisham early on Christmas Day morning.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: NR Worthing SE Coast
  • Location: NR Worthing SE Coast

    Failure by BBC weather then, no mention of any snow for Xmas eve night nevermind settling snow, met didn't either 

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    Posted
  • Location: Blackburn - 180m asl
  • Location: Blackburn - 180m asl
    1377465.jpg
    WWW.EXPRESS.CO.UK

    BRITAIN is bracing for 21 inches of snow to strike as a bitter -9C Arctic blast could hit, according to the latest forecasts.

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Cold spell continuing into January. Snow for some.

    _________________________________

    Wednesday 30 December – Sunday 3 January

    Remaining cold. Snow showers and frost.

    A few of us have already seen some snowfall this week. There is more on the way for many during the rest of the week. A combination of a large high pressure ridge over the north Atlantic and low pressure areas over the North Sea is leading to cold northerly winds over the UK. On Wednesday, a small low pressure area will track eastwards across south-west England and the English Channel. This threatens to bring some sleet and snow to some southern counties of the UK on Wednesday afternoon, evening and overnight.

    But recent computer model runs have been trending further and further south with its track and making it a weaker feature. So, we may end up with just some localised snowfall over the hills of southern England. Further north, cold and frosty early and late in the day, with a risk of freezing fog patches on Wednesday night.
    Ice on untreated surfaces. Sleet, hail and snow showers will continue in coastal counties. Throughout the day on Thursday, sleet and snow showers will become more widespread and organised, pushing southwards from Scotland over central parts of the UK.

    Further snow accumulations and ice over the higher ground. The end of this week will remain cold with widespread frost at night. The days will be cold too, with winds swinging into the north-east. A sleet or snow shower is possible almost anywhere, but most likely over the northern and eastern half of the UK. Further local snow accumulations.

    Monday 4 January – Sunday 10 January

    The cold pattern continuing. Risk of snow showers.

    Remaining colder than average, as the UK remains on the cold side of high pressure over the far north Atlantic, Iceland and Greenland. Last winter, we failed to see an Arctic high pressure blocking pattern develop like this, and we ended up with mild and very wet, westerly winter. The middle part of this current winter is certainly proving to be different. The succession of Atlantic low pressure areas and fronts that normally bring the UK frequent south-westerly winds, cloud and rain will be diverted to southern Europe, and then down into northern Scandinavia. This means that western areas of the UK, in particular, will see less rainfall than normal, with a reduced threat of gales and flooding.

    Indeed, after the very wet mid-December period, the river levels will get a chance to return closer to normal. It will still be cold enough for showers to fall as sleet and snow, leading to additional accumulations in places. Frost, ice and freezing fog are all potential hazards. There is chance that a new blast of cold air from the Arctic will sweep south in the second half of the week. But at the moment it doesn't look anywhere near as intense as the 'Beast from the East' cold spell in early March 2018! That will take some beating.

    Monday 11 January – Sunday 24 January

    A gradual transition to wetter and not as cold.

    The week beginning Monday 11th January is expected to remain colder than average, particularly during the first half of this week and across the northern half of the UK. With persistent high pressure over Greenland and Iceland, this will serve to continue to divert the north Atlantic low pressure track into Spain and France.
    It will also encourage cold air flows from the Arctic to push into the UK from the north. But compared with the previous week, the low pressure areas out over the north Atlantic will start to become more vigorous and nudge closer to the south-west of the UK.

    This could lead to a period of quite severe winter weather for a short time, as approaching fronts and heavy rain move into the colder air over the UK. Strong easterly winds and heavy snow would be likely, especially over central and northern areas where the cold air is most entrenched. It's far too early to be any more specific, but even at these early stages we can see some potential for such impactful UK weather in the large scale northern hemisphere weather patterns. Heading through mid-January and beyond, the low pressure areas and milder air from the south-west seem most likely to win out, with low pressure becoming a significant feature overhead the UK.

    Milder air from the south-west will be more common again, especially over southern England and Wales. A return to the pre-Christmas weather pattern is indicated by the latest models, with plenty of wet weather over England and Wales, strong winds in the south at times. River levels should have reduced since the flooding around Christmas, but if rainfall becomes prolonged then we should be mindful of this hazard. Scotland may find it harder to shake off the cold air, with occasional frost and snow most likely here, when low pressure areas clear eastwards from the UK into Scandinavia.

    Further ahead

    There is plenty of uncertainty on the detail for mid-late January, as the weather influences on the UK pattern start to conflict. Our update will offer the latest thoughts on whether the cold spell could last throughout the month or not.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Abingdon - 55m ASL - Capital of The Central Southern England Corridor of Winter Convectionlessness
  • Weather Preferences: Winter: Snow>Freezing Fog; Summer: Sun>Daytime Storms
  • Location: Abingdon - 55m ASL - Capital of The Central Southern England Corridor of Winter Convectionlessness

    I found the latest BBC online forecast, uploaded 4 hours ago to be completely out of kilter with all the latest modelling for next week:

    1. It starts by acknowledging that 'many' places in the north and west have lying snow already.

    2. The phrase 'the weather is looking generally settled', does not compute with the graphics and indeed the current radar with showers piling in.

    3. The statement 'showers mostly rain to lower levels' does not correlate with many reports of lying snow, let alone snow falling, away from hills and indeed in urban areas.

    4. Temperatures reaching 4-6C. Even here we briefly barely scraped 4C today and many lowland places had much lower maxima, especially where the snow fell.

    5. High Pressure dominant, well yes, but easterly breeze and showers are equally being driven by lower pressure to the south-east, causing the steep pressure gradient.

    6. Constant references to it being largely dry and downplaying the gradual encroachment of colder air from the east, amount of showers and only a possibility of rain to snow on higher ground in heavier bursts.

    7. Reference to turning more unsettled, but the only indicator of this on the summary graphic is rain next sunday in Fort William.

     

    It's almost as if they are still relying on forecast data from last week, are in denial or they think that the Abingdon 'must avoid snow at all costs microclimate' has expanded to cover all of the lowland UK.

    Edited by The Enforcer
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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Cold start to January, less cold and wetter later.

    _________________________________

    Wednesday 6 January – Sunday 10 January

    Staying cold but dry and calm for most.

    For the rest of this first full week of 2021, the UK is expected to be sat between a weakening low pressure system in central Europe and a strengthening high pressure system west of Ireland. This will keep things feeling a bit colder than normal with a northerly wind bringing in plenty of bands of cloud and occasional precipitation. The air is still going to be cold enough that showers expected in eastern areas Wednesday and Thursday will likely be wintry even to low levels, bringing a risk of icy patches. On Thursday and Friday some bands of rain will spread southwards over the UK, although for much of Scotland this will fall as sleet or snow.

    This weekend the weather is likely to take a turn towards something drier and sunnier, especially in southern areas, as high pressure develops to the west of Ireland and pushes cloud away. There is a bit of uncertainty on the temperatures at the moment, with some milder air toppling over the top of the ridge of high pressure into Scotland and eventually spreading into southern areas. This will mean by Sunday temperatures will have widely moderated to nearer normal, perhaps even a bit above normal in some spots. A weak front will be draped across northern coasts of Scotland Saturday and Sunday, keeping it damp and grey there, but some good sunshine is likely further south, making a change from the rather grey and cold first half of the week.

    Monday 11 January – Sunday 17 January

    Turning wetter and not as cold.

    For the second full week of 2021 we expect a gradual shift in the weather pattern as we head through mid-January. This will see the high pressure off to the west of Ireland begin to diminish and retreat southwards into the Mediterranean. At the same time, the jet stream (a band of fast moving air in the upper atmosphere that drives weather systems) will strengthen over the North Atlantic, bringing a return of Atlantic weather systems and a more unsettled pattern (although likely not until the weekend).

    For much of the working week it will likely continue to be cold and mostly dry. Rain will be most frequent in northern areas from weak fronts drifting along the top of the high. These will bring some milder air as well, and this may occasionally reach down into southern areas. However, this will only be 1-2 days of temperatures nearer to normal for mid-January before colder air returns. Snow showers will ease for the east as the winds become more north-westerly.
    As fronts begin to move in from the west later in the week, they will bring some more widespread rain as well as milder air from the sub-tropical Atlantic. There is a chance that the high may retreat a bit quicker which will allow the Atlantic weather systems to push in earlier in the working week. This would lead to a milder and wetter pattern throughout the country.

    Monday 18 January – Sunday 31 January

    Staying unsettled with a risk of cold spells.

    For the end of January, the more progressive pattern with frequent Atlantic weather fronts is expected to continue. The jet stream will often be overhead, leading to temperatures being near or a bit above average, especially in the south. The fronts and nearby jet stream will make for a rather changeable weather pattern as lows move through quickly and brief ridges of high pressure drift in between them. These highs will bring some colder air and make for frosty nights at times.

    Heading later into January there is a growing risk of some of these cold snaps become more widespread and longed-lived. They are still expected to be the exception rather than the norm like we saw over the holiday break, but by late-January there is potential for some sharp cold snaps between fronts.

    The main alternative scenario is high pressure in the Mediterranean building further north into central Europe, resulting in the colder polar airmass sticking around for longer. This would lead to calmer, drier, and colder weather, mainly for the southern half of the country. Scotland would still expect wet and windy conditions even in this scenario, so confidence in the forecast is a bit higher for them.

    Further ahead

    We will have a closer look at the second half of the month along with the threat of any late January cold snaps

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Turning unsettled with increasing risk of cold.

    _________________________________

    Saturday 9 January – Sunday 17 January

    Less cold, but some large temperature swings.

    This weekend, we will see a change in the recent very cold but mostly drier than normal weather pattern that has stuck around for the past week. We will see low pressure systems move in from the northwest bringing some wetter, cloudier, and less cold air throughout the country. Lowland and hill snow chances will fade for a time, although the northern Scottish Highlands will still see some hill snow. Temperatures will be nearer to normal, but likely still feel a touch colder than usual.
    Heading into next working week, the weather is expected to become a bit changeable.

    As low pressure slides across Scandinavia, we will likely see the first half of the week bring some milder air. Although, some chilly nights are still likely with frost for many. Colder weather is expected around midweek, with the end of the week and weekend seeing chances for another mild spell. It will also tend to be wetter than normal with low pressure systems bringing frequent bands of rain in. There is a growing risk of some snow later in the week. But there is still a lot of uncertainty on the day-to-day specifics as the UK sits between the two dominant weather systems for Europe. So in short, we expect a volatile week of temperature swings and frequent rain, along with a chance of some snow in places later.

    Monday 18 January – Sunday 24 January

    Wetter weather with some volatile temperatures.

    As we enter late-January, the forecast gets a bit more complicated. There are some strong signals for possible return of low pressure track, which would bring milder but wetter and windier weather. However, this comes with a rather large caveat, the polar vortex. This is a circulation of winds in the stratosphere, about 40-60 kilometres above the surface, and typically keeps cold Arctic air trapped at the pole. In early January, the vortex weakened and became displaced over Europe, and it's still overhead now. It usually takes a few weeks for the effects to reach the surface, so around mid-to-late January we expect an increased chance of cold outbreaks. At the moment, it looks like the coldest weather will miss us to the east, staying in Scandinavia and West Russia.

    There is still a lot of uncertainty on the westward extent of the cold air, and we could see a few cold blasts mixed in with our overall milder, wetter weather. As a result, this week is likely to continue to see some volatile swings in temperature along with some wet and windy days. Fronts moving in over a cold snap will bring a chance of snow, even to low levels, but it is still too far away to pick out the specifics. Confidence is medium on the forecast, mainly due to the uncertainty in the temperatures. There is risk of more widespread cold, as we have seen in previous years with a displaced polar vortex.

    Monday 25 January – Sunday 7 February

    Unsettled and milder with a risk of cold.

    Towards the end of January and into early February, there continues to be strong signals for a return of low pressure tracks from the south bringing wetter, windier, and milder conditions. This will be coupled with the polar vortex strengthening again back to normal levels by the end of the month. Although, there is still a delay in the impacts reaching the surface, so cold outbreaks are still possible into early-February. As with the previous week, we expect the cold to mostly stay to the east of us and low pressure to be the dominant feature, especially in February.

    The UK will tend to find itself on the boundary between the cold high pressure to the east and the milder low pressure to the west, so confidence is pretty low. A minor shift in the weather pattern will lead to some large changes in the expected conditions for the UK, so some caution is needed at this range. In general, it will likely be on the milder side of average with frequently wet and windy weather, along with 1-2 day cold snaps bringing frost and a chance of wintry weather at times.

    Further ahead

    We will monitor the weak polar vortex and see if we can more accurately pin down where the coldest conditions in North Europe will be.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Madrid Airport Shut After Storm Filomena Covers City in Snow

    "Madrid’s international airport has been shut after heavy snowfall covered the Spanish capital and much of the rest of the country. Spain’s biggest hub will remain closed Saturday, state-controlled airport manager Aena SA said on Twitter. More than 50 flights were already canceled or diverted Friday. The snowfall has also prompted the suspension of train services to and from Madrid, while a soccer game of local club Atletico de Madrid slated for the afternoon has been postponed.

    Storm Filomena moved north from the Gulf of Cadiz, causing the biggest snowfall in decades in Madrid. While some extemporaneous skiers appeared in the streets of the city, its bus services have been suspended and a special military unit deployed, mainly to help trapped drivers. Around 1,000 vehicles that got stuck in the snow have been rescued in the Madrid region, while hundreds are still blocked, according to local emergency services. Two people were found dead after their car was swept away by a river in the southern province of Malaga, according to an emailed statement from the Spanish Interior Ministry."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-01-09/madrid-airport-shut-after-storm-filomena-covers-city-in-snow?srnd=premium-europe&utm_source=twitter&cmpid%3D=socialflow-twitter-tictoc&utm_medium=social&utm_content=tictoc&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic

     

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    Posted
  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Often unsettled with increasing risk of cold

    _________________________________

    Wednesday 13 January – Sunday 17 January

    Variable temperatures but less cold than recently

    The rest of the working week is expected to see some quite changeable weather across the UK, with a low pressure system on Wednesday and Thursday bringing some widespread rain and cloudy skies. For Northern Ireland, rain will be heavy and last for much of the day, bringing a risk of some local flooding. Scotland and Northern England will see a risk of snow or ice for higher ground. From Thursday and into Friday, a ridge of high pressure will extend into the UK from the south and southwest, bringing a respite from the wet weather and also keeping temperatures hovering near normal.

    However, the next low pressure system will begin to push in from the west, reaching Northern Ireland and western Scotland overnight Friday into the weekend, so not everyone will be dry. This low will make for an unsettled weekend with some milder but wetter weather for Saturday followed by a drier, colder and windier Sunday. There will be a split in temperatures with northern areas a bit colder than normal on Sunday while the southern half of the country is near or a little above normal, but cloudier. In short, we expect a volatile week of temperature swings and frequent rain, along with a chance of some snow for northern areas.

    Monday 18 January – Sunday 24 January

    Wetter weather with some cold snaps

    As we enter late-January, the forecast gets more complicated. There are some strong signals for the low pressure track (which at the moment is displaced south in Spain and Italy) to return nearer to the UK, which would bring milder but wetter and windier weather. However, this comes with a rather large caveat: the polar vortex. This is a circulation of winds in the stratosphere, about 40-60 kilometres above the surface, and typically keeps cold Arctic air trapped at the pole. In early January, the vortex weakened and became displaced over Europe, and it's still overhead now. It usually takes a few weeks for the effects to reach the surface, so around mid-to-late January until early February we expect an increased chance of cold outbreaks.

    It continues to look like the coldest weather will miss us to the east, staying mostly in Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, and western Russia. There is still uncertainty on the westward extent of the cold air, and we could see a few cold blasts mixed in with some milder, wetter spells. These will be felt most in eastern and northern parts of the UK, while southern and western areas more often slightly milder. A highly variable forecast with large swings in temperature along with some wet and windy days is still expected, continuing from mid-January. Confidence is medium to low on the forecast, mainly due to the uncertainty in the temperatures. The UK is on a fine line between being more frequently cold or more frequently mild. There is greater risk of more widespread cold, as we have seen in previous years with a displaced polar vortex.

    Thursday 25 February – Sunday 7 February

    Unsettled with cold outbreaks nearby

    Towards the end of January and into early February, there continues to be strong signals for a return of low pressure tracking from the south bringing wetter, windier, and milder conditions. However, a second weakening of the polar vortex is beginning in Siberia now, and this will likely delay the milder air from reaching us, prolonging the risk of cold. As the polar vortex returns to the Arctic and strengthens again by early February, we should begin to see the cold become less widespread, but this may be delayed for north Europe until nearer to mid-February. As with the previous week, we expect the cold to mostly stay to the east of us and low pressure to be the dominant feature, especially into February.

    The UK will tend to find itself on the boundary between the cold high pressure to the east and the milder low pressure to the west, so confidence is pretty low on the specifics. A minor shift in the weather pattern will lead to some large changes in the expected conditions for the UK, so some caution is needed at this range. In general, it will likely be on the colder side of average mixed with some mild, wetter spells that last for 2-3 days at a time. Between low pressure systems there will be some sharp cold snaps, with a chance that cold could well turn more widespread if the polar vortex lingers in Russia longer than expected.

    Further ahead

    As a second polar vortex weakening event is ongoing, we will be able to look deeper into February next time to examine when the cold outbreak may end.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

    Edited by Summer Sun
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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Highly variable temperatures for a few weeks.

    _________________________________

    Saturday 16 January – Sunday 24 January

    Swingy temperatures and snow risks for some.

    As a cold ridge of high pressure over the UK slides away to the southeast into Europe this weekend, a frontal system will push in from the Atlantic. This front will bring in some milder air. It will also bring snow and ice for northern and eastern areas on Saturday morning, with the milder air arriving slightly later. Sunday and Monday will see another ridge of high pressure slide over the southern half of the UK. Things will stay rather breezy and unsettled for the north. This high will bring in plenty of cloud though, so it won't tend to be too sunny. Next week, a stronger low pressure system is expected to move in on Monday bringing some wet weather throughout the country through midweek.

    Snow is unlikely expected for the highest ground in Scotland, thanks to the milder sub-tropical air moving in from the Atlantic. Temperatures will be above average through midweek, but it is still January, so highs will still tend to be below 10C for most. For the second half of the week and weekend, the temperatures will dip away below average again, with a risk of some snow showers for northern parts of Scotland and perhaps into Northeast England. The low pressure from Monday will likely stall over Central Europe as high pressure builds in Greenland and Russia. This will keep a cold northerly wind over the UK for a few days, but it will also be a bit drier for southern areas. Next weekend, there is potential for a low to bring some wintry weather for southern England as it speeds through the English Channel. But confidence is low on whether this will materialise or not.

    Monday 25 January – Sunday 31 January

    Turning wetter and milder with some cold snaps.

    For the rest of January, the high pressure system building in Greenland will play a major role in our weather pattern, despite being hundreds of miles away. This is because the jet stream, a ribbon of fast moving air in the upper atmosphere that drives weather systems, is being pushed further south in the Atlantic. The southward track of low pressure systems will allow them to pick up some milder sub-tropical air and drag it into western Europe behind warm fronts. This weather pattern is likely to persist through the week, so we will see low pressure systems bring milder air from the west and southwest along with plenty of rain and some stronger winds.

    Between these lows there will be a few days of some sharp cold and dry weather as a brisk northerly wind develops. As the next fronts move in over the colder air, there will be risks of some wintry weather for some areas, mainly the north but also the east too. Snow or freezing rain is possible, even to low levels at times. So, while a repeat of 2018's Beast of the East does not appear likely, that doesn't mean we will escape any potentially disruptive wintry weather. If high pressure in Russia is a bit stronger than we currently expect, lows will tend to stall in Central Europe or Scandinavia. This will bring some longer-lived cold snaps to the UK. This is more of a risk scenario though, with a thirty percent chance of happening.

    Monday 1 February – Sunday 14 February

    Staying unsettled and increasingly milder.

    By early February, the high pressure system in Greenland is expected to begin to ease, but it will certainty take its time doing it. As it slowly weakens, lows will be able to move into Northwest Europe more freely, bringing some longer-lived mild spells associated with warm fronts. Between the low pressure systems, cold snaps are still likely, but will become increasingly shorter-lived. The temperature is likely to still be very changeable, shifting from a few degrees above average in the mild spells to several degrees below average in the cold snaps with some sharp frosts likely. Again, as with late January, some wintry weather is possible as fronts move in over the top of the colder air.

    There are some signals that by mid-February it may tend to be milder most of the time which will ease the risk for wintry weather (at least for everywhere but the Scottish Highlands!). However, confidence is low at this range as computer model forecast skill as been very poor in recent days. There is a high risk for more prolonged cold to develop into mid-February, which would be caused by stronger high pressure to the north. This would also be a drier pattern for the UK as the Atlantic low pressure systems mainly track south of us and head into France, Spain, and Portugal.

    Further ahead

    Hopefully, we will be able to better pin down the weather pattern for February with some additional data on the high pressure system in Greenland.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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  • Location: Hoyland,barnsley,south yorkshire(100m asl)
  • Weather Preferences: severe storms,snow wind and ice
  • Location: Hoyland,barnsley,south yorkshire(100m asl)

     

    WWW.BBC.CO.UK

    A phenomenon called Sudden Stratospheric Warming is currently taking place, but what is it and what does it mean for the weather in the UK?

     

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Major incident declared as Storm Christoph heads to the UK

    "A major incident has been declared in South Yorkshire as Storm Christoph is set to bring widespread flooding, gales and snow to parts of the UK. People are being urged to prepare as an amber weather warning for rain was issued by the Met Office for Tuesday to Thursday for central northern England, affecting an area around Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield and stretching down to Peterborough.

    It has led to a major incident being declared in South Yorkshire in preparation for potential flooding, said Ros Jones, mayor of Doncaster"

     

    8b19a71596178a85231011a00c976d63
    UK.NEWS.YAHOO.COM

    More than 100 flood warnings and alerts have been issued in England.

     

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    An unsettled month with variable temperatures.

    _________________________________

    Wednesday 20 January – Sunday 24 January

    Stormy midweek with a colder weekend ahead.

    The low pressure centre of Storm Christoph will move into the UK from the southwest on Wednesday afternoon. There will be bands of heavy rain for most of the day for England and Wales bringing a risk of further flooding. Scotland will start out mostly dry, but heavy snow bands will push into southern areas in the afternoon. Snow will mostly stay above 100m, but may occasionally fall lower than this. However, the warm front from Christoph will also bring in some mild air, with highs into double figure for some in southern England and Wales.

    By Thursday, morning Storm Christoph will have tracked northwest through England and be sitting just east of Edinburgh. Heavy snow will persist through much of Thursday for Scotland. Again, most of the heavy snow accumulation will be above 100m, but wet snow may reach sea level in places. Strong winds will spread through eastern areas of England, but elsewhere in the county it will be a mostly sunny. Western coastal areas will have windy day with a few sharp showers.

    From Friday and into the weekend, as Storm Christoph moves away to the northeast and fills, a northerly wind will bring some colder air from the North Atlantic.This will bring temperatures back down to near or below average. Some weak low pressure centres will keep things unsettled, cloudy, and feeling cold through the weekend, but strong winds and heavy rain are not expected.

    Monday 25 January – Sunday 31 January

    Turning wetter and milder with some cold snaps.

    For the rest of January, a high pressure system building in strong over Greenland will play a major role in our weather pattern here in the UK. This is because the jet stream is being pushed further south in the Atlantic by this high. This more southward track of low pressure systems will allow them to pick up some milder sub-tropical air from the Atlantic and drag it into western Europe. This will be behind warm fronts, the first of which is likely to arrive on Monday 25th. This weather pattern is likely to persist through the week, so we will see low pressure systems bring milder air from the west and southwest along with plenty of rain and some stronger winds.

    Between these lows there will be a few days of some sharp cold and dry weather as a brisk northerly wind develops. There is still some uncertainty on the exact timings of the frontal systems, but in general we can expect one every 2-4 days. As the next fronts move in over the colder air, there will be risks of some wintry weather for some areas, mainly the north.

    Snow or freezing rain is possible, even to low levels at times. So, while a repeat of 2018's Beast of the East does not appear likely, that doesn't mean we will escape any potentially disruptive wintry weather.

    Monday 1 February – Sunday 14 February

    Staying unsettled and increasingly milder.

    By early February, the high pressure system in Greenland is expected to begin to ease, but it will certainty take its time doing it. As it slowly weakens, lows will be able to move into Northwest Europe more freely, bringing some longer-lived mild spells associated with warm fronts. Between the low pressure systems, cold snaps are still likely, but will become increasingly shorter-lived. The temperature is likely to still be very changeable, shifting from a few degrees above average in the mild spells to several degrees below average in the cold snaps with some sharp frosts likely. Again, as with late January, some wintry weather is possible as fronts move in over the top of the colder air.

    There are some signals that by mid-February it may tend to be milder most of the time.This will ease the risk for wintry weather (at least for everywhere but the Scottish Highlands!). However, there remains a significant risk that more prolonged cold could develop into mid-February, which would be caused by stronger high pressure to the north. Confidence is therefore very low at this range as computer model forecast skill as been very poor in recent days.

    There is a high risk for more prolonged cold to develop into mid-February, which would be caused by stronger high pressure to the north. This would also be a drier pattern for the UK as the Atlantic low pressure systems mainly track south of us and head into France, Spain, and Portugal.

    Further ahead

    We will continue to monitor the Greenland high and try to pin down when the changeable and unsettled pattern will end, but after all, this is still Britain in winter.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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  • Location: Chipping Norton, 220mts /720ft asl
  • Location: Chipping Norton, 220mts /720ft asl

    "We're all going to die.....etc"

     

    1387579.jpg
    WWW.EXPRESS.CO.UK

    MET OFFICE forecasters have issued fresh weather warnings for snow and ice across England this weekend as the winter deluge continues. Here are the latest warnings.

     

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Unsettled at first but turning drier and colder.

    _________________________________

    Saturday 23 January – Sunday 31 January

    Changeable pattern of cold snaps and mild spells.

    This weekend, as Storm Christoph moves away in Scandinavia, a colder air mass will feed into the UK from the north. This will lead to some lighter winds and sunnier skies at times. But also bring temperatures below average throughout the country. Despite the sunshine in some places, a few weak low pressure systems this weekend will bring a risk of lowland snow to western and southern areas. There will also be a band of snow likely on Sunday moving through southern Wales and England.

    For the first half of next week, the colder air mass will remain in place keeping things drier than normal and colder than normal. Some sharp frosts are likely, especially in Scotland. On Tuesday night and into Wednesday, the next low pressure system from the Atlantic will arrive bringing a band of rain spreading northwest across the UK into Wednesday afternoon. This will also bring some milder air from the sub-tropical Atlantic. So after a few colder days, temperatures are expected to recover around midweek. Through the end of the week and following weekend, the weather will continue to be warmer than normal for late-January. It will also be unsettled with some stronger winds at times.

    There are some early signals for a potentially stormy weekend to close out January. There is still some uncertainty on the strength and timing of this low pressure system. This may stay out over the ocean. In short, it will be a quite changeable week with a cold, mostly dry. It will be a frosty start and mild, wet, and windy finish.

    Monday 1 February – Sunday 7 February

    Unsettled and changeable weather continues.

    For the first week of February, we don't expect too much to change in the weather pattern from late-January. The low pressure track will continue to send Atlantic weather systems into the UK from the west and southwest making for a changeable week. There will be mild, wet, and windy spells mixed with drier cold snaps with sharp frosts. There will also be a slight chance of some wintry weather even to low levels at times. High pressure is expected to gradually build over Greenland in early February.

    This will tend to push the low pressure track further south. This will be a slow process and likely not happen until a bit later in the month. However, there will be plenty of cold air nearby to the north and northeast that will become increasingly widespread. The cold snaps in early-February may tend to feel a bit colder than the ones in late-January. This may last for a few more days. As the low pressure systems move in from the sub-tropical Atlantic, they will be able to tap into some warmer air to give them a bit more energy. There is a chance that we can see another storm push through similar to Storm Christoph. Confidence is pretty high overall for early February for Europe. But for the UK, confidence is a bit lower as we are on the boundary between two different air masses. The difference between the colder and warmer air masses is around 15 Celsius! So minor shifts could lead to some large swings in the expected temperature for a given day.

    Monday 8 February – Sunday 21 February

    Gradually turning drier but colder.

    As we head into the second and third weeks of February, we will likely see a gradual pattern shift away from the more unsettled weather of January to a drier, colder picture. This is because the high pressure system in Greenland from early February will strengthen enough to eventually push lows into South Europe. Therefore, Spain and Italy will get all the wet and windy weather. For the UK, the colder air mass will move in from the north and bring temperatures consistently below average.
    This will also be a drier air mass, so rain (or snow rather) is not expected to be as frequent. This will be a gradual change though; likely taking place over several days through mid-February.

    There will still be some wet, windy, and mild days at first. By the third week of February and beyond, it will likely be largely dry but cold. The colder air mass will help create some sharp frosts overnight for much of the country. Despite the days growing longer as we head to the end of meteorological winter, late-February could well end up being colder than late-January as air masses continue to shift around. Confidence for middle and late February's weather is still low. There is a lot riding on the exact strength of the Greenland High pressure, which computer models are currently doing a pretty poor job of forecasting.

    Further ahead

    We will closely monitor the Greenland High's development through late-January and see just how tenacious it might be through February - and how long this cold may linger.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    I think this is the best of the lot from the Express

    UK snow forecast: Swirling polar vortex to trigger weeks of heavy snow – 42inches incoming

    "A brutal cold front is forecast to smash into the UK from a northerly direction from the Arctic this week and last at least two weeks until February 10. Central parts of Scotland could be blasted with a staggering 42inches (104cm) on Tuesday, February 9 at 12pm, the latest snow depth models from WXCHARTS show. Before that, February 1 could start with 19 inches (50cm) in the same region.

    Saturday, February 6 is then expected to see 31 inches (80cm) in eastern areas of Scotland. Snow could also fall in western parts of England over the next couple of weeks, with (13cm) hitting the Lake District in the north west on Wednesday, February 3. Plymouth in the south west may also be blasted with (16cm) on Friday, February 5. Temperatures could also plunge as low as -12C in central Scotland on Saturday, February 6. Cumbria in the north west could see -7C hit on Thursday, February 4, while Manchester and Stoke are hit with -4C. London and Luton are likely to average 0C next week, while Bristol is hit with -2C on Saturday, February 6."

     

    1388636.jpg
    WWW.EXPRESS.CO.UK

    BRITAIN is bracing for 42 inches of heavy snow to bombard some regions as the polar vortex could trigger weeks of snow, according to the latest forecasts.

     

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    Midwest America braced for 'historic' snowstorm with up to a foot set to fall in hours

    "A major winter storm has caused disruption across Midwest America - with a warning of a "historic" snowfall on the way. The National Weather Service said at least 4ins (10cm) of snow was expected across most of an area stretching from central Kansas northeast towards Chicago and southern Michigan.

    Parts of southeast Nebraska and western Iowa could get more than three times that much - up to a foot in just hours. Meteorologist Taylor Nicolaisen said it had been over 15 years since more than a foot of snow had fallen in a single storm.

    "This is historic snow," he said. Around 300 salt spreaders are on the streets of Chicago and almost 200 flights have been cancelled at both the city's main airports"

    skynews-snow-snowstorm-mid-west_5250592.
    NEWS.SKY.COM

    A winter storm has already caused disruption in several states, amid warnings the worst of the weather is yet to come..

     

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  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.
  • Weather Preferences: Heavy disruptive snowfall.
  • Location: Manchester Deansgate.
    15 hours ago, Summer Sun said:

    I think this is the best of the lot from the Express

    UK snow forecast: Swirling polar vortex to trigger weeks of heavy snow – 42inches incoming

    "A brutal cold front is forecast to smash into the UK from a northerly direction from the Arctic this week and last at least two weeks until February 10. Central parts of Scotland could be blasted with a staggering 42inches (104cm) on Tuesday, February 9 at 12pm, the latest snow depth models from WXCHARTS show. Before that, February 1 could start with 19 inches (50cm) in the same region.

    Saturday, February 6 is then expected to see 31 inches (80cm) in eastern areas of Scotland. Snow could also fall in western parts of England over the next couple of weeks, with (13cm) hitting the Lake District in the north west on Wednesday, February 3. Plymouth in the south west may also be blasted with (16cm) on Friday, February 5. Temperatures could also plunge as low as -12C in central Scotland on Saturday, February 6. Cumbria in the north west could see -7C hit on Thursday, February 4, while Manchester and Stoke are hit with -4C. London and Luton are likely to average 0C next week, while Bristol is hit with -2C on Saturday, February 6."

     

    1388636.jpg
    WWW.EXPRESS.CO.UK

    BRITAIN is bracing for 42 inches of heavy snow to bombard some regions as the polar vortex could trigger weeks of snow, according to the latest forecasts.

     

    Oh i don't know so much this not quite up to the usual high standards of ramping from them, i remember one once on the front page '100 days of snow'

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  • Location: Darlington
  • Weather Preferences: Warm dry summers
  • Location: Darlington

    BBC monthly outlook

    Summary

    Unsettled at first but turning drier and colder

    _________________________________

    Wednesday 27 January – Sunday 31 January

    Milder but wetter end of the week for most

    The first half of this week was marked by persistent and widespread cold across the country with very sharp frosts and a lot of snow for southern England as well. An Atlantic weather system pushing into the UK on Wednesday will bring a return of the milder sub-tropical air from the Atlantic and bring an end to the frosty start of the week.

    Through the rest of January, the weather will continue to be warmer than normal for the time of year but also very unsettled with frequent bands of rain, heavy in places, and some stronger winds at times. As fronts sweep across the country, hills in northern areas will also see some heavy snow at times.

    This weekend will continue the unsettled trend but there is some uncertainty on the strength of a low pressure system expected on Sunday. At the moment there are some signals for a sharp frost on Saturday night followed by a potential for some wintry weather on Sunday, but this is reliant on the front moving in at the correct time. If it is a bit too late or a bit too early, the lowland wintry weather is not likely and instead we will just see heavy rain with snow staying over hills.

    In short, it will be an unsettled last few days of January with a potentially cold and wintry final day of the month.

    Monday 1 February – Sunday 7 February

    Changeable weather with a chance of storms

    For the first week of February, the weather pattern over Europe will be largely unchanged from late January, at least on a large scale. The low pressure track will continue to send Atlantic weather systems into the UK from the west and southwest making for a changeable week. There will be mild, wet, and windy spells mixed with drier, colder snaps with sharp frosts along with a slight chance of some wintry weather even to low levels at times.

    High pressure is expected to build over Greenland and northern Europe in early February, strengthening as we head deeper into the month. This will tend to push the low pressure track further south into the Mediterranean Sea. It will be a slow process though and likely not happen until a bit later in the month. However, there will be plenty of cold air nearby to the north and northeast that will become increasingly widespread.

    The cold snaps in early-February may tend to last a few more days compared to late-January. As the low pressure systems move in from the sub-tropical Atlantic, they will be able to tap into some warmer air to give them a bit more energy. There is a chance that we can see a few stronger winter storms push through bringing some significant winds or rain.

    Confidence is pretty high overall for early February for Europe, but for the UK it is a bit lower as we are on the boundary between two different airmasses. The difference between the colder and warmer airmasses is around 10 Celsius so minor shifts could lead to some large swings in the expected temperature for a given day.

    Monday 8 February – Sunday 21 February

    Gradually turning drier but colder

    For the second and third weeks of February, we will likely see a gradual pattern shift away from the more unsettled and changeable weather of January to a drier, colder picture. This is because the high pressure system in Greenland from early February will strengthen enough to eventually push lows into southern Europe, so Spain and Italy will get all the wet and windy weather.

    For the UK, the colder airmass will move in from the north and bring temperatures consistently below average. This will also be a drier airmass so precipitation will be less frequent, but there will be a growing risk of lowland snow from any showers that do manage to develop. This will be a gradual change though, likely taking place over several days through mid-February, so there will still be some wet, windy, and mild days at first. By the third week of February and beyond, the colder and drier pattern looks to be more dominant. The colder airmass will help create some sharp frosts overnight for much of the country.

    Despite the days growing longer as we head to the end of meteorological winter, late-February could well end up being colder than late-January as airmasses continue to shift around.

    Confidence for middle and late February's weather is still rather low, as there is a lot riding on the exact strength of the Greenland high which computer models are currently doing a pretty poor job of forecasting.

    Further ahead

    We will continue to keep a close eye on the factors leading to the development of high pressure in Greenland, as this will be the main driver of cold weather in February.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/outlook

     

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