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HAILSTONE HORROR: Heatwave interrupted by surprise snow storms

 

BRITAIN’S weather took another twist as hail and snow storms battered some areas on the first weekend of Spring. The big freeze came just a week after some parts of the UK had been hotter than Corfu and basking in 17C (63F) sunshine. The north shivered with temperatures plunging to -4C (25F) last night and giant icicles forming at Teesdale, Co Durham. Thick snow also covered areas of Cumbria and North Yorkshire as drivers battled through blizzards. As far south as Devizes, in Wiltshire, residents were battered by a freak hail storm yesterday morning.

 

Local youngsters played with monster hailstones which fell on the town and even made “hailstone cakesâ€. Weathermen warn that the cold snap will continue to chill the nation this week. A Met Office spokesman said it would stay mainly cold, windy and rainy, with lows of 2C (35F) and highs of 10C (50F). More snow could also be on the way soon. Ironically, Winter officially ended last Thursday which marked the start of the Spring equinox. Bookies are now slashing odds that snow will fall in London, which has already been hit by thunder and hail showers.

 

Ladbrokes are offering 10-1 that the capital will see a flurry before March finishes next Monday. Spokeswoman Jessica Bridge said: “In a matter of days, March has gone from sunshine to snowfall and unfortunately the odds suggest the latter is on the way for the remainder of the month.†Two men aged 25, from Walsall, are recovering after being rescued from Snowdon in Wales.

 

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/371149/Durham-and-Wiltshire-hit-hard-by-unexpected-hail-storms

 

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What spring? Now Britain is hit by snow and giant hail stones after mini-heatwave

 

JUST as Britain was getting used to some sunshine, the north of the country was this weekend covered in snow. Wintry showers across northern parts led to snowfall over County Durham, Cumbria and Northumberland. The glorious weather of last week seemed but a memory as residents of the northern counties experienced plunging temperatures and bleak conditions. The rest of the country is also experiencing chillier weather as widespread frost set in overnight. In Wiltshire, a freak hail storm saw thousands of giant balls land as temperatures plummeted. The snowy conditions do not look set to last, however, and will be confined to northern areas, according to Met Office meteorologist Krista Mitchell.

 

She said: "Snow is very unlikely for most places – it tends to be above high ground. "There could be some over Scotland and the North Yorkshire Moors but we are not expected it to be that wintery." Earlier this week a freak hail and snow storm left a woman and a seven-week-old baby in hospital after they were involved in an accident on the A74M between Glasgow and Carlisle. Appalling driving conditions forced police to close the motorway between Johnstonebridge and Moffat. It seems we were spoilt with last weekend's glorious weather as current temperatures are far more typical for this time of year. Ms Mitchell said: "This weather is a real contrast to last weekend. This coming week's temperatures will be about average for the UK. The maximum temperature we can expect today is around nine or 10C." In contrast, the mini March heatwave earlier this month saw temperatures soar as high as 20C – hotter even than Greece and Turkey, whose top temperatures only hit 17C.

 

Thousands of Britons flocked to parks and beaches to bask in the unseasonably warm weather after the wettest winter on record. But as many sadly pack away their barbecues once again, there is some good news for the coming months: earlier this week experts predicted that we may in for our hottest summer yet thanks to the El Nino weather pattern.

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/466421/Weather-UK-covered-in-SNOW-as-temperatures-plunge-just-one-week-after-scorching-sunshine

 

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Oh the headlines do a role reverse now we are seeing chillier conditions- where has the warm set to last rest of the month gone.. last night one of the coldest and the coldest in some spots all winter..

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UK's future climate to be all sorts

 

British winters are likely to become milder and wetter like the last one but cold spells still need to be planned for, says the UK Met Office. Summers are likely to be hotter and drier, but washouts are still on the cards, it adds. The assessment of future weather extremes finds the role of human influence is "detectable" in summer heatwaves and in intense rainfall. However, the Met Office says a lot more work must be done to confirm the links. The study has been released before a major new international climate report next week.

 

That report, to be produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, will look at the likely future impacts of global warming. If the British assessment sounds confusing, you are not alone. Assuming the Met Office study is correct (and its forecast runs out to the end of the century), it means everything from gumboots to snowploughs and sunscreen to anoraks will still be needed. As the report's authors themselves readily admit, the British weather varies so "hugely year to year due to natural processes" that detecting trends is tough, and detecting a manmade fingerprint even harder.

 

'Fickle path'

 

Stephen Belcher, head of the Met Office Hadley Centre, sums it up like this: "We've got to continue living with the cold events and we've got to get used to the hot events." He points out that a warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture, and that the most intense downpours seem to have become more frequent over the past 50 years - what the report calls the changing "character" of British rainfall. But that does not guarantee that we will definitely see an increased number of storms in the future. The British Isles are not only tucked beside a vast Atlantic Ocean whose temperatures have a powerful effect on our weather, they are also at the receiving-end of the jetstream. And this fast-flowing "river of wind" drives storms our way along a fickle path that remains poorly understood - it's an "inherently chaotic" factor, according to Prof Belcher.

 

The Met Office study is timed to coincide with the start of the final negotiations of the IPCC's Working Group II report. The scientists and officials involved in that task are closeted in Yokohama. While that report will assess the latest science on the possible impacts of climate change on a global scale, the Met Office has tried to do the same for Britain.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26731790

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Climate change will make UK weather too wet and too dry, says Met Office

  • UK will see wetter, milder winters and hotter, drier summers due to global warming, scientists predict

The UK's weather will become both too wet and too dry – and also too cold and too hot – as climate change increases the frequency of extreme events, the Met Office has warned in a new report. Its scientists concluded that on average the UK will see wetter, milder winters and hotter, drier summers in the long term due to global warming. But the natural year-to-year variability of weather will also mean occasional very cold winters, like that of 2010-11, and very wet summers, like that of 2012. Recent years have seen highly variable weather in the UK, with a drought in early 2012 and the greatest deluge for at least 250 years and widespread flooding over the winter of 2013-14. "We have to continue to live with the cold events, but get used to the warm events," said Professor Stephen Belcher, head of the Met Office's Hadley Centre and who led the report. "The boundaries we have to adapt to are expanding." He said that, on current trends of carbon emissions, the extreme European heatwave of 2003, which killed tens of thousands of people, would become a normal summer by the 2040s.

 

Scientists have already shown that the risk of heatwaves like the 2003 event has been at least doubled by climate change, as has the risk of flooding like that seen in 2000 in southern England. Researchers are currently investigating whether climate change exacerbated the risk of the record wet winter of 2013-14. The new report states: "The role of human influence on our climate is already detectable on summertime heatwaves and on the character of UK rainfall."

 

The Met Office found that days of heavy rain in the UK expected three times a year in the 1960s and 1970s are now happening more than four times a year. Prof Jim Hall, at the University of Oxford and not involved in the Met Office report, backed its conclusions: "Some impacts of climate change are already materialising and they will impact via extremes." The Met Office report comes ahead of a major report due on Monday on the global impacts of climate change from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Prof Belcher said: "Some of the impacts of climate change will come to the UK from events in countries outside the UK: the world is interconnected."

 

For examples, Prof Hall said, the extreme heatwave in Russia and eastern Europe in 2010 seriously damaged the wheat harvest: "UK food prices went up by 5% as a result." He said the UK was vulnerable to extreme weather elsewhere because it imports 40% of its food. But adapting to climatic changes is difficult, Prof Hall said: "Even in a relatively well-governed country like the UK, adaptation is an uphill struggle. It is difficult to stitch together all the things you need to do." He noted that building still takes place on flood plains, efforts to reduce water use in anticipation of droughts are not working and that infrastructure, such as the mailine railway that was washed in the sea at Dawlish in February, remains vulnerable.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/mar/25/climate-change-uk-weather-wet-dry-met-office

Edited by Summer Sun

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Nobody can predict the future climate, the met office can't even get a winter forecast right. This winter threw a spanner in the works and bought weather nobody was expecting. One thing is for sure, there are plenty of surprises in the works for the uk, weatherwise!Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

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Summer heatwaves here to stay as seasons become more extreme thanks to climate change, say experts

  • [*]
More than half of summers by 2040s are likely to be hotter than they were in 2003, observations suggest [*]20,000 people died in heatwave which peaked in August 2003, the hottest spell in Europe for 500 years [*]Weather experts say people will still have to plan for occasional very cold winter, as occurred in 2011 [*]Heavy downpours are becoming more frequent in UK - a pattern likely to be linked to climate change [*]Climate change is likely to affect UK's food supplies and prices as well as its weather, says professor

Powerful heatwaves are expected to hit Britain regularly by the 2040s as the country experiences more extreme weather, scientists claimed today. They said sharp contrasts in seasonal weather are forecast for the UK in decades to come as climate change sends summer temperatures soaring. But there is no evidence winters will become generally milder - and people will still have to plan for the occasional very cold winter, as occurred in 2011. In addition, experts have noticed signs that heavy downpours are getting more frequent, and also believe warmer weather could lead to food shortages. The Met Office said there is now good evidence that climate change is stoking up warmer summers in Britain.

 

Observations over the past ten years suggest that by the 2040s more than half of summers are likely to be hotter than they were in 2003. More than 20,000 people died in the record-breaking heatwave which peaked in August 2003, the hottest spell in Europe for 500 years. While the UK was not at the centre of the heat zone, it was still affected. The same is likely to apply in the future as Europe feels the summer impact of climate change. ‘Summer 2003 certainly had an influence in the UK,’ said Professor Stephen Belcher, head of the Met Office's Hadley Centre. ‘At the moment, we're able to say that by the 2040s we can expect events like 2003 to be normal.’

 

Rainfall trends were harder to track, he said. But there were signs that heavy downpours were becoming more frequent in the UK - a pattern likely to be linked to climate change. On the other hand, the recent series of soggy British summers was thought to be due to natural climate variation. ‘Heavy rain is becoming heavier and that's consistent with our picture of a warming world and warming atmosphere,’ said Prof Belcher. ‘There is evidence that in the UK we are seeing more heavy rainfall events.’ Looking at rainfall intensity, what would have been a one-in-125 day event in the 1960s or 1970s was now a one-in-85 day event. The predictions are contained in a report from the Hadley Centre ahead of the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment due next week. The climate scientists concluded: ‘The UK has seasonal weather that varies hugely from year to year due to natural processes.

 

Nevertheless, human influence has been detected in the hot temperatures experienced in Europe during the summer of 2003. 'And there are signs that the character of rainfall has shifted in the last 50 years with slightly more heavy rainfall events, consistent with a warmer atmosphere holding more water. ‘Other seasons, such as the cold winter of 2010/11 and the wet summer of 2012 appear to be associated with natural fluctuations in the UK's varied climate.’ Climate change is likely to affect the UK's food supplies and prices as well as its weather, warns IPCC scientist Professor Andrew Challinor, from the University of Leeds. Warmer temperatures were expected to reduce wheat yields in temperate regions by up to 10 per cent and losses of 25 per cent would become ‘more common’ in the second half of the century. Produce from the tropics, such as rice and maize, was expected to suffer most from global warming, said Prof Challinor.  The impact on supplies was likely to lead to price rises. ‘We need to be thinking ahead about where we get our food,’ the professor added.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2589067/Summer-heatwaves-stay-seasons-extreme-thanks-climate-change-say-experts.html

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Weather: Summer heatwave is here to stay and hotter than ever

 

HEATWAVES are here to stay...experts predict that by 2040 more than half of British summers will be hotter than the sweltering temperatures of 2003. Scientists suggest climate change will set summer temperatures soaring, but say there is no evidence to suggest this means milder winters. Predictions that hot summers will become the norm are based on Met Office observation during the past 10 years. More than 20,000 people died in the record-breaking heatwave which peaked in August 2003, the hottest spell in Europe for 500 years. While Britain was not at the centre of the heat zone, it was still affected, with 2,000 heat-related deaths in the UK that year. The highest temperature was 102F (39C) in Brogdale, Kent on August 10. Professor Stephen Belcher, the head of the Met Office’s Hadley Centre, which studies climate change, said: “Summer 2003 certainly had an influence in the UK.

 

“By the 2040s we can expect events like 2003 to be normal.†Rainfall trends were harder to track, he said, but there were signs that heavy downpours were becoming more frequent in the UK – a pattern likely to be linked to climate change. However, the recent soggy British summers were thought to be due to natural climate variation. “Heavy rain is becoming heavier and that’s consistent with our picture of a warming world and warming atmosphere,†said Professor Belcher. “There is evidence that in the UK we are seeing more heavy rainfall.†In rainfall intensity, what would have been a one-in-125-day event in the Seventies was now one-in-85 days.

 

The predictions are in a report from the Hadley Centre ahead of the latest Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change assessment due next week. The scientists concluded that “human influence has been detected in the hot temperatures experienced in Europe during the summer of 2003â€. The report added: “Other seasons, such as the cold winter of 2010/11 and the wet summer of 2012 appear to be associated with natural fluctuations.â€

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/466920/Weather-forecasters-predict-British-summer-heatwave-is-here-to-stay

Edited by Summer Sun

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Weather: Mother's Day Temperatures May Hit 20C

 

The arrival of British Summer Time at the weekend is set to coincide with a period of warmer weather for many parts of the UK. Clocks go forward at 1am on Mother's Day this Sunday, meaning we lose an hour's sleep but get longer, lighter evenings. Temperatures are set to climb to around 13 to 17C (55 to 62F) on Saturday. And they could reach as high as 15 to 20C (59 to 68F) on Sunday, when we lose an hour's sleep as British Summer Time arrives. However before that, it is expected to feel quite cold in the UK due to a chilly wind coming from the east. Plenty of showers are also expected, some of which will bring snow to high ground. Then, by the weekend, the wind is set to change to a more southerly direction which will bring in warmer air.

 

Sky News weather forecaster Isobel Lang said: "This week, our weather pattern will switch from the usual prevailing wind direction to an easterly wind bringing in air which has travelled over a chilly North Sea. "Although not exceptionally cold there will be a chill to the wind and it'll feed in plenty of showers - some of which will bring snow to high ground, especially overnight. "This easterly will last until the weekend before turning more southerly. It'll draw in warmer air across us and and the warmth will be very welcome."  However Lang cautioned: "Not everyone will enjoy some sunshine, though, with the east coast of Scotland looking cooler and duller and southwestern parts of Britain set for some showers."

 

Meanwhile, in the decades to come there are expected to be sharp contrasts in seasonal weather for the UK as climate change sends summer temperatures soaring. Scientists expect powerful heatwaves such as the one that hit continental Europe in 2003 to be commonplace by the 2040s. But there is no evidence that winters will become generally milder, say the experts. Despite the summer heat, people will still have to plan for the occasional very cold winter, as happened in 2011.

 

http://news.sky.com/story/1232138/weather-mothers-day-temperatures-may-hit-20c

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Weather: Mother's Day Temperatures May Hit 20C

 

The arrival of British Summer Time at the weekend is set to coincide with a period of warmer weather for many parts of the UK........

Meanwhile, in the decades to come there are expected to be sharp contrasts in seasonal weather for the UK as climate change sends summer temperatures soaring. Scientists expect powerful heatwaves such as the one that hit continental Europe in 2003 to be commonplace by the 2040s.

 

Oh well, there's nowt we can do about it. Guess I'll have to get me mobike out. 2040's huh? Everyone reading now will be either dead by then/  forgotten about such claims / have far bigger (real) things to fret over / have grown up a little or it'll have been revised to the 2080's.

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After the 100 days of snow fail Nathan Rao is back with 120 days of hot sunshine

 

120 DAYS OF HOT SUNSHINE: Britain set to bask in longest summer since 1910 say forecasters

 

THE WHOLE of Britain is about to roast in a scorching FOUR-MONTH super-summer with temperatures hitting 100F within weeks. Experts say ENTIRE COUNTRY is heading for the hottest summer in HISTORY - one that will put even last year's sizzling heatwave the shade. Early long-range weather models predict scorching temperatures and wall-to-wall sunshine will arrive in May and hold out until the end of August. Forecasters said late spring will “light the blue touch paper†for the mercury to rocket with the potential for summer weather records dating back to 1910 to tumble. The said parts of the country could see a repeat of last July’s heatwave, which itself was the longest since 1976, with temperatures hitting 82F (28C) or above for 19 days. The glorious prediction comes as Britain gears up for a roasting weekend and Mother’s Day with temperatures set to hit 70F (21C) on Sunday.

 

Jonathan Powell, forecaster for Vantage Weather Services, said this summer is expected to follow the pattern of “extreme weather†seen over the past two years. Much of the UK can expect a run of “significant heat spikes†with the good weather set to arrive in just weeks. He said: “We are looking at a summer of extremes, with May set to light the blue touch paper and some very decent weather on the way. “It is likely to follow the same pattern of extremes in weather we have already seen, meaning some significant heat spikes and spells of dry fine weather. “These conditions could trigger another heatwave similar to last year’s, we are living in times which are generating quite staggering themes in the weather.†He said 70F (21C) likely in the south a this weekend with highs of around 63F (17C) in the north making it the hottest day of the year so far.

 

It follows predictions from climate scientists that by 2040 British summers will regularly be hotter than the historic scorcher of 2003. The Mercury hit 102F (39C), the UK’s highest temperature, in Brogdale, Kent on August 10 while more than 20,000 people died in the record-breaking heatwave. Professor Stephen Belcher, the head of the Met Office’s Hadley Centre, which studies climate change, said: “By the 2040s we can expect events like 2003 to be normal.† Scientists say an El Nino weather pattern this year, when warm deep waters on the Pacific equator rise to the surface, could result in soaring global temperatures.. The Met Office said low pressure close to the south of the country this weekend will draw warm air in from the Continent sending the mercury rocketing. However a brief cold spell before will bring the possibility of some snow showers across the UK tomorrow and Friday.

 

Met Office forecaster Dan Williams said temperatures are expected to stay well above-average through the weekend and into next week. He said: “We are expecting some fairly warm weather over the weekend as low pressure draws air in from the southeast, and the Continent. “Temperatures of up to 20C [68F] will be above-average for the time of year and these look like holding out into next week. “However the end of this week is colder and there could be some snow around on Wednesday and Thursday nights, though it will not settle on lower ground.†Bookies last night slashed the odds on the hottest summer ever with next month bringing the highest April temperatures recorded. Paddy Power has cut the odds on the mercury soaring past the current April record of 27.4C (81F) recorded in Hampshire 2011 to 10/3, and beating the hottest temperature ever to 4/1. A spokesman said: “With rumours of El Nino brining some much needed sun to these rain drenched shores, we’ve been forced to slash our odds for 2014 to be a scorcher and run for the beach.â€

 

Ladbrokes has slashed the odds on Sunday hitting 20C or more anywhere in the UK to 2/1 and set 4/1 on it being the hottest day of the year so far. Spokeswoman Jessica Bridge said: “Don’t worry if you haven’t got your Mum a present yet, buy her some new sunglasses because the odds suggest she’ll be needing them on Sunday.†Leon Brown, forecaster for The Weather Channel, said parts of Britain could wake up to sleet or snow this morning with a cool end to the week expected. He said “It will be chilly and cloudy with moderate to fresh easterly winds over  the next couple of days, some showers and sleet mixed in. “It is looking much warmer for the south this weekend as winds veer around from the Continent. “Warm winds early next week, temperatures may reach 20C in the south-east on Monday and 19C (66F) on Tuesday.â€

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/467048/Long-range-UK-weather-forecast-predicts-hot-sunshine-will-last-FOUR-months

Edited by Summer Sun

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Not that I don't want to see a nice summer but surely the fact that the same combination of tabloid and weather expert had numerous headlines like the one below going throughout the winter means it makes a mockery of the whole forecasting thing?

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/443462/Winter-2013-expected-to-be-worst-since-1947-with-heavy-and-persistent-snow-forecast-for-UK

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Weather April 2014: a spring and summer likely to rival Ibiza sees Paddy Power cut its odds

 

Dust off the bucket and spade and buy new a sun hat, as Irish bookmakers Paddy Power has cut the odds on the weather in April rivalling that in Ibiza or Athens. The cut follows predictions that the UK could be affected by the El Niño pattern, which occurs when waters on the Pacific equator are unusually warm, which can lead to disruptive changes in ocean and wind currents across the world. Paddy Power had offered odds for 2014 to beat the all-time high of 38.5C recorded in Brogdale, Kent, in 2003 from 7/1 at the start of the year to 4/1. The bookmakers is also offering 6/1 for Boots to report record annual sunblock sales and 10/1 for B&Q to smash barbecue sales, and 5/2 for a nation-wide hosepipe ban to be imposed this year. In a report published in March, the Met Office concluded that European summers are getting warmer and the very hot summer of 2003 – when more than 20,000 people died in an a continent-wide heat-wave – will be the norm by the 2040s.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/weather-april-2014-a-spring-and-summer-likely-to-rival-ibiza-sees-paddy-power-cut-its-odds-9217326.html

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We can expect a washout Summer now after that Express article....

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Mothering Sunnyday! Weekend temperatures to soar to 20C

 

BRITS are set to lap up the sun this weekend with a 20C Mother’s Day scorcher on the way. The topsy-turvy weather will take another twist as temperatures shoot up after the cold snap. Forecasters at The Weather Channel said the south-east and Wales will sizzle in 18C on Saturday, and temperatures will keep rising through Sunday and into the start of next week. Ladbrokes is offering a 2-1 shot on a 20C belter for Mother’s Day. And it is 4-1 that the Met Office confirms Sunday as the hottest day of the year so far. Ladbrokes spokeswoman Jessica Bridge said: “Don’t worry if you haven’t got your mum a present yet – buy her some new sunglasses because the odds suggest she’ll be needing them on Sunday.â€

 

Dan Williams from the Met Office said: “After seeing some slightly abnormal temperatures for this time of year, perhaps slightly cooler during this week, as of Saturday we should see temperatures get a bit of a bump up.†And blazing weather will help the post-weekend blues as Monday stays at a glorious 20C. Meanwhile, experts are saying we could be in for a scorcher of a summer with a heatwave starting in May and set to last months. Early long-range indications suggest the entire country is in for high temperatures and wall-to-wall sunshine. Experts said May will “light the blue touch paper†with the good weather lasting until August. They said parts of the country could see a repeat of last July’s heatwave, the longest since 1976.

 

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/371618/Weekend-weather-forecast-predicts-sun-and-20C-temperature

 

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Snow sweeps southern England… but this weekend should be sunny with temperatures set to hit 20C

  • [*]Light flurries of snow covered parts of Hertfordshire, Surrey and Kent today [*]Shock blizzards came as summer looms this weekend when the clocks go forwards welcoming British Summer Time [*]Forecasters expect the mercury to soar at the end of the week with temperatures reaching 20C [*]The UK will be hotter than Turkey, say experts as they predict the warm weather will stick around into next week

As Britain prepares for summer to begin with temperatures set to reach 20C this weekend parts of the country were shivering under a dusting of snow. Swathes of southern England were carpeted in white as a flurry of snowflakes fell this afternoon. Parts of Hertfordshire were battered by wintry conditions, and light blizzards were also spotted in Surrey and Kent. Plunging temperatures caused freak hail storms in parts of the country over the weekend. But this coming weekend, as the clocks go forward an hour, British Summer Time is set to start and parts of the country will tip Turkey in the temperature stakes.  And the rising mercury is expected to hit 20C, with the above-average temperatures continuing into early next week.

 

But with an extra hour of daylight to enjoy as of Sunday, some parts will fair better than others. Forecasters are predicting warm weather in the south east, while north eastern and eastern parts of the UK will remain cooler with showers expected in some areas. Dan Williams from the Met Office said: 'It is looking mainly dry, with a fair bit of cloud, but some brighter spells in the far west, so parts of west Wales and southwestern England on both Saturday and Sunday. 'After seeing a some slightly normal temperatures for this time of year - perhaps slightly cooler during this week - as of Saturday we should see temperatures get a bit of a bump up.

 

We could see 19 or 20 maybe, perhaps in the southeast of England, as we see warmer weather move up from the continent, bringing slightly warmer temperatures than we have seen recently.' The forecasted balmy temperatures are double the average of 10C expected at this time of year, and will leave Britain almost three times as hot as the seven degrees expected in Ankara, Turkey.  Mr Williams said: 'The average maximum temperature for this time of year is about 10 degrees in England. But while temperatures will be a above average, it is not unusual to see them rise above average.' However, as the clocks go forward an hour on Sunday and we all lose some sleep, the prospect of summer is not something all Britons can look forward to.

 

Mr Williams warned that northeastern and eastern parts of the UK will still feel the chill that gripped much of the nation this week. He said: 'It will continue to feel fairly chilly and it will be colder in the northeast with some showers expected on Sunday.' However, he added that come Monday, most of the country will see temperatures in their mid-teens, despite the risk of some more rain.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2590003/Snow-sweeps-southern-England-weekend-sunny-temperatures-set-hit-20C.html

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After the 100 days of snow fail Nathan Rao is back with 120 days of hot sunshine

 

120 DAYS OF HOT SUNSHINE: Britain set to bask in longest summer since 1910 say forecasters

 

THE WHOLE of Britain is about to roast in a scorching FOUR-MONTH super-summer with temperatures hitting 100F within weeks. Experts say ENTIRE COUNTRY is heading for the hottest summer in HISTORY - one that will put even last year's sizzling heatwave the shade. Early long-range weather models predict scorching temperatures and wall-to-wall sunshine will arrive in May and hold out until the end of August. Forecasters said late spring will “light the blue touch paper†for the mercury to rocket with the potential for summer weather records dating back to 1910 to tumble. The said parts of the country could see a repeat of last July’s heatwave, which itself was the longest since 1976, with temperatures hitting 82F (28C) or above for 19 days. The glorious prediction comes as Britain gears up for a roasting weekend and Mother’s Day with temperatures set to hit 70F (21C) on Sunday.

 

Jonathan Powell, forecaster for Vantage Weather Services, said this summer is expected to follow the pattern of “extreme weather†seen over the past two years. Much of the UK can expect a run of “significant heat spikes†with the good weather set to arrive in just weeks. He said: “We are looking at a summer of extremes, with May set to light the blue touch paper and some very decent weather on the way. “It is likely to follow the same pattern of extremes in weather we have already seen, meaning some significant heat spikes and spells of dry fine weather. “These conditions could trigger another heatwave similar to last year’s, we are living in times which are generating quite staggering themes in the weather.†He said 70F (21C) likely in the south a this weekend with highs of around 63F (17C) in the north making it the hottest day of the year so far.

 

It follows predictions from climate scientists that by 2040 British summers will regularly be hotter than the historic scorcher of 2003. The Mercury hit 102F (39C), the UK’s highest temperature, in Brogdale, Kent on August 10 while more than 20,000 people died in the record-breaking heatwave. Professor Stephen Belcher, the head of the Met Office’s Hadley Centre, which studies climate change, said: “By the 2040s we can expect events like 2003 to be normal.† Scientists say an El Nino weather pattern this year, when warm deep waters on the Pacific equator rise to the surface, could result in soaring global temperatures.. The Met Office said low pressure close to the south of the country this weekend will draw warm air in from the Continent sending the mercury rocketing. However a brief cold spell before will bring the possibility of some snow showers across the UK tomorrow and Friday.

 

Met Office forecaster Dan Williams said temperatures are expected to stay well above-average through the weekend and into next week. He said: “We are expecting some fairly warm weather over the weekend as low pressure draws air in from the southeast, and the Continent. “Temperatures of up to 20C [68F] will be above-average for the time of year and these look like holding out into next week. “However the end of this week is colder and there could be some snow around on Wednesday and Thursday nights, though it will not settle on lower ground.†Bookies last night slashed the odds on the hottest summer ever with next month bringing the highest April temperatures recorded. Paddy Power has cut the odds on the mercury soaring past the current April record of 27.4C (81F) recorded in Hampshire 2011 to 10/3, and beating the hottest temperature ever to 4/1. A spokesman said: “With rumours of El Nino brining some much needed sun to these rain drenched shores, we’ve been forced to slash our odds for 2014 to be a scorcher and run for the beach.â€

 

Ladbrokes has slashed the odds on Sunday hitting 20C or more anywhere in the UK to 2/1 and set 4/1 on it being the hottest day of the year so far. Spokeswoman Jessica Bridge said: “Don’t worry if you haven’t got your Mum a present yet, buy her some new sunglasses because the odds suggest she’ll be needing them on Sunday.†Leon Brown, forecaster for The Weather Channel, said parts of Britain could wake up to sleet or snow this morning with a cool end to the week expected. He said “It will be chilly and cloudy with moderate to fresh easterly winds over  the next couple of days, some showers and sleet mixed in. “It is looking much warmer for the south this weekend as winds veer around from the Continent. “Warm winds early next week, temperatures may reach 20C in the south-east on Monday and 19C (66F) on Tuesday.â€

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/467048/Long-range-UK-weather-forecast-predicts-hot-sunshine-will-last-FOUR-months

 

Is this the same fantasist who forecast heavy rain and floods until May?

 

Whoever is allowing this muppet the oxygen of publicity should be sacked on the spot.

Edited by Carl46Wrexham

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Guess I'd best start building my Ark right away. I love this sort of cobblers really - it's right up there with anything AGW and always good for a laugh, especially when it all inevitably goes wrong. Keep it up,guys.

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First mention of the building Nino in the 'red top' press? I guess we'll be seeing a lot of this over the next 18 months! If folk have been wondering at the global weather extremes over the past few years then what are they going to make of the extremes a 0.8c hike in global temps will drive as Nino bites hard?

Edited by Gray-Wolf

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I can see the headlines now  - 'Hell Nino, and things are going to get worse blah blah', while everyone wonders what the fuss is all about.

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Finally dry: The Somerset Levels are free from floods - THREE months after the rain

 

THE Somerset Levels are finally dry - THREE months after the heaviest January rainfall for 250 years caused devastating floods. Residents are now preparing to move back after enormous Dutch pumps finished pumping tens of millions of tonnes of water out of the area.  These aerial shots show the scale of the disaster, which left 25 square miles underwater.  Miles of 4ft-deep dirty water have now turned into acres of mud as far as the eye can see.  Around 7,000 homes were flooded across the south west during weeks of relentless rain.  At the height of the disaster, the pumps were shifting a staggering rate of 7.3 million tonnes of water a day - enough to fill Wembley Stadium SEVEN times over. Insurers have put the damage so far at £1.1billion but that figure is set to rise.

 

Among the images is the home of builder Sam Notaro, who became a latter-day King Canute after refusing to abandon his multi-million pound home to the floods. Instead, the 40-year-old constructed his own defences in a bid to keep the deluge at bay at his pad in Moorland, Somerset. The defences worked but instead of water, the property is now surrounded by a sea of mud.  James Winslade, 40, who became a national figure of the crisis, this week returned some of his 550 cows to his farm in West Yeo, Bridgwater. They had been scattered all over Somerset after all 790 acres of his farm went underwater and he lost 10,800 bales of hay and straw, and countless farm machines. He said: "It will be a relief to get them back, it will make life so much easier. I can get some feed in and I won't have to take it back and forth."

 

According to the Met Office records, England and Wales had the wettest winter since at least 1766.  While the waters may have gone, there are fears that it could be another two years before the soil returns to a level where it can grow viable crops.  On Monday, the dredging will start - a day within David Cameron's promised timeframe.  The Environment Agency is set to begin a £5.8million plan to clear a five-mile stretch of riverbeds on the Tone and Parrett.  Engineers will dig out tonnes of sediment which has built up since dredging stopped 18 years ago, in a bid to improve the capacity of the rivers, currently operating at just 60 per cent. The initial dredging is just the start of a 20-year £100million plan - put together by locals - to ensure their homes are never engulfed by murky flood waters ever again. Speaking ahead of the dredging, Sedgemoor District Council chief executive Kerry Rickards said: "When the waters recede and the media spotlight moves on to something else, it's very easy to get moved on to the next challenge. "However we will keep chasing for money to prevent prolonged flooding. We will not stand by and run the risk of more floods when we have spells of prolonged rain."

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/467251/Finally-dry-The-Somerset-Levels-are-free-from-floods-THREE-months-after-the-rain

 

Britain's bonkers weather is snow joke: We're in for a HEATWAVE

 

FREEZING parts of Britain were battered by freak snow blizzards yesterday – just days before summer time officially begins. The north and south-west were hammered by the white stuff. Thick snow covered areas of Devon, Cumbria and Northumberland and caused chaos on the roads. But by Mothering Sunday parts of the UK will be basking in blazing sunshine as our bonkers weather takes a turn for the better. Yesterday ploughs were seen wading through the snow at Hartside Top Cafe, in Cumbria, England’s highest cafe. The white flurry is set to continue today, mostly in Dartmoor, Devon, but will thaw out for the weekend. Parts of northern England will be staying chilly this weekend as researchers at the University of Southampton say climate change is beginning to wipe out our winters, with autumn ending later and spring starting earlier.

 

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/371787/Britain-s-bonkers-weather-is-snow-joke-We-re-in-for-a-HEATWAVE

 

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British summer time really will begin this weekend with 20C forecast as clocks go forward (but it's still SNOWING on Dartmoor and parts of north)

  • Late sunset and warm temperatures will give first summer evening to the Southeast
  • Temperatures in the Southeast on Sunday will hit 20C, higher than those in Turkey, Greece and Algeria
  • The further north you go, the colder it will be, with highs in northern Scotland peaking at 8C

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2590003/Snow-sweeps-southern-England-weekend-sunny-temperatures-set-hit-20C.html

Edited by Summer Sun

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Massive lightning bolt halts Eurostar and parts of Britain are still covered in SNOW... but sunny 21 degrees forecast for tomorrow

  • [*]Kent is struck by electrical storm and Dartmoor is covered in thick snowfall, but the sun is coming out tomorrow [*]Huge lightening strike hit houses in Folkestone and hundreds were delayed after depot fire near Channel Tunnel [*]Met Office says Sunday may be the hottest day of the year so far and most of us will have a dry and warm weekend [*]Will be cloudier in the north and north east Scotland, but temperatures could go as high as 21C - hotter than Spain

Streaking across the sky, this massive bolt of lightning was part of a huge electrical storm that brought chaos to rail and road users.Eurostar had to cancel services after the lightning struck an electrical sub-station next to the Channel Tunnel entrance in Cheriton, Kent, causing a fire. It caused a loss of power and resulted in four Eurostar trains being stopped from travelling through the tunnel in both directions. Several hundred passengers were delayed as the trains were returned to where they started. A series of smaller blazes also led to commuter rail services out of London being cancelled.

 

One of the lightning bolts hit 25-year-old Sophia Swarbrick’s home in Folkestone, Kent, while she was putting her children to bed – but luckily her family escaped injury. Miss Swarbrick said: ‘Fluorescent blue light lit up the house, then the whole place rumbled and the lightning hit the roof. It was terrifying.’ She earlier posted online: 'That hit my roof!  You should have heard my windows!  I cried and left the house and took the kids.' Forecasters say the freak weather conditions will abate over the weekend, with most of the country forecast to have warm sunny spells and temperatures of up to 21C in London, possibly giving Britain its hottest day of the year so far and making it hotter than Spain.

 

Photographer David Shackle, 62, captured these astonishing pictures of a lightning strike over Folkestone last night after climbing a hill overlooking the port to take pictures of the sunset. He said: 'I thought I would shoot the sunset and I got a nice panorama of Folkestone before the sky suddenly went red and it felt very eerie indeed. 'The sky changed from red to black and clouds came tumbling in, so I decided to stay and see what happened.  Then the lightening strikes came - great loud cracks from the sky down onto the Creteway housing estate.' Mr Shackle, a retired photographer who worked with David Bailey, posted his pictures online.

 

The electrical storm, which also struck residents in Norfolk later on, brought chaos to Kent, causing a fire at the Dollands Moore freight depot at Cheriton, near the Channel tunnel entrance. Pierre Delalande of Eurostar said: 'Four trains were affected - two from Paris to London, one from Brussels to London and one from London to Paris. 'The only one that didn't make it was London to Paris because of a delay after the lightning, so it went back to London.' The electrical storm coincided with a snowstorm over the M20 motorway in Kent, causing accidents including an eight-car pile-up on the M20, although only four people suffered minor injuries. Several houses were struck by lightning in the Folkestone and Dover area, although no one was reported to have been injured, and the emergency services received dozens of 999 calls.

 

However, Saturday and Sunday are forecast to be sunny, with temperatures of up to 21C in London. Nicola Maxey, of the Met Office, said Sunday could turn out to be the hottest day of the year so far, topping this year's highest temperature of 20.5C, which was recorded in Gravesend, Kent, on 9 March. She said: 'It's going to be warm and sunny in the south east tomorrow, particularly in the afternoon, with temperatures of up to 19C.  It will be cloudier in the south west, although there will be some sunshine there, too, while further north and into Scotland there's a high chance that it's going to be quite overcast. 'Also in the north east and in north east Scotland tomorrow there's a chance of showers, and on Sunday there will be a similar divide across the UK.' She said temperatures were forecast to reach up to 20C or higher on Sunday, adding: 'There's a chance we may reach the high so far of 20.5C and even just top it slightly in the south.' The forecast for the early part of next week is more of the high temperatures although it may be wetter and more unsettled.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2591610/Massive-lightning-bolt-halts-Eurostar-parts-Britain-covered-SNOW-sunny-21-degrees-forecast-tomorrow.html

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BBQ Britain to bask in the hottest weekend of the year with 24 degree heat

 

BRITAIN is about to bake in the hottest weekend of the year so far with temperatures set to hit 75F (24C) by tomorrow. The mercury is set to rocket to more than double the average for this time of year – making the UK hotter than Benidorm, Ibiza, Mallorca and Malta. The North can look forward to widespread highs of 64F. Met Office forecaster Dan ­William said: “It is looking pretty decent this weekend and up until Wednesday, with temperatures well above average. “In some places it will be ­double the maximum average.†The prospect of a sizzling weekend and Mother’s Day has led supermarkets to stock up on summer party food and drinks. Sainsbury’s expects barbecues to fly off the shelves and sales of ice cream to soar by 650 per cent and sun cream by 35 per cent. However, the East is likely to be cooler, with chilly coastal winds. Jonathan Powell, of Vantage Weather Services, expects parts of the South to hit the mid-70s.

 

That would beat the 69F recorded in Gravesend, Kent, ­earlier this month, on the hottest day of the year so far. Mr Powell said: “It is looking very good. The best of the ­sunshine will be across central and southern areas.†But blue skies and wall-to-wall ­sunshine are expected to last at least until the end of April, bringing the hope of a roasting Easter. “Easter looks favourable with the chance of some spells of very good weather,†said Mr Powell. For this weekend, bookies Coral has set odds of 5/6 on ­temperatures between 68F and 77F while 79F or higher is 9/1. Along with supermarkets, garden centres are looking ­forward to bumper business. Former BBC broadcaster Michael Fish said: “Warm air will begin to move in from the South-east and eventually reach most parts of England. The jet stream for a change is out of our way.†Coral spokeswoman Nicola McGeady said: “Punters are putting their money on this year being the hottest ­summer in history.â€

 

Leon Brown, forecaster for The Weather Channel, said the glorious weather is thanks to warm air drawn in from the Continent. However, he warned prolonged high temperatures could trigger thunderstorms. A freak snow and electrical storm brought chaos to Kent on Thursday night, causing a fire near the Channel Tunnel and an eight-car pile-up on a motorway. Several houses were also struck by lightning although no one was reported to have been injured. An electrical sub-station xcaught fire at Dollands Mooore freight depot next to the Channel Tunnel entrance. It caused a loss of power and resulted in four Eurostar trains being stopped from travelling through the tunnel in both directions. Eurostar said “several hundred†passengers had to endure delays as the trains were returned to where they started. But the company said no trains were stopped in the tunnel itself.

 

http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/467543/BBQ-Britain-to-bask-in-the-hottest-weekend-of-the-year-with-24-degree-heat

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