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Scottish Politics 2011-2017


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Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    Crikey, I go outside to do the garden and find you lot have been hammering at your keyboards like demons in the meantime. I just can't keep up.

     

    Just one thing stands out from SS: you wrote that Cameron wants us to vote Labour, well yes, I guess, but he's not exactly doing a good job is he? In fact, I'd say his comments this morning were verging on suicidal.

     

    And just to add to others' comments... even if I write things a bit squint and undiplomatically at times, freedom of expression is sacred.

     

    Anyway, back to the digging...

     

    There's an elephant in the room, unfortunately.

     

    Remember on a small Scotland subsample caveats apply. This one had, e.g. double the number of UKIP respondents than average for example.

     

    Here's prof C's PoP. He can't be accused of bias. Well, at least not towards the SNP!

     

    Based on  2010 polls incidentally, we might see Con drop to e.g. 2011 levels on the day.

     

    Slide17.jpg

    Edited by scottish skier
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    And that ignorant, offensive, rant sums up exactly why the YES campaign failed  

    Good god. What a load of boarish spiteful bile from bad losers has been posted during the night. I actually dread to think how Scotland would be run if this is representative of how the yes vote behav

    I'm disappointed in the lack of grace shown by some across the net in accepting this No vote. A complete lack of any empathy and understanding as to why fellow Scots didn't vote Yes.   I personally

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    Posted
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl
  • Weather Preferences: Freezing fog, frost, snow, sunshine.
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl

    Almost 1 in 5 in some of the recent polls. That is a lot of "sympathy"

    Well, 15% is closer to 1 in 7, but still a legitimate point. Their support is quickly aging though so it's a bit of a ticking time bomb; Ruth Davidson might well do something to address this but at the moment the Tory revival in Scotland is nowhere to be seen.

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    Posted
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter and dry and very warm in summer
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.

    Well, 15% is closer to 1 in 7, but still a legitimate point. Their support is quickly aging though so it's a bit of a ticking time bomb; Ruth Davidson might well do something to address this but at the moment the Tory revival in Scotland is nowhere to be seen.

    I like Ruth Davidson. I think she represents 'Scottish' Tories better than the English Euroskeptic, socially conservative right down south...

    I agree, support will continue to seep away...

    1) the party needs more autonomy. Infact being a 'sister' party to the English Tories would be a big boost. A release from the shackles (much like Scottish Labour).

    2) They need to move to the left further. Again, though they can't since they're just a branch office too. Already fairly liberal I'd say.

    - Not saying this should be important -

    But (since it's the Tories) the sexuality of the Scottish leader does help improve the image of the party. A sign of change.

    3) PR would help a bit.

    4) being more pro devolution too

    EDIT: off topic, I know but what does the last line of your signature say?

    Edited by SW Saltire
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    Posted
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl
  • Weather Preferences: Freezing fog, frost, snow, sunshine.
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl

    Well, 15% is closer to 1 in 7, but still a legitimate point. Their support is quickly AGING though so it's a bit of a ticking time bomb; Ruth Davidson might well do something to address this but at the moment the Tory revival in Scotland is nowhere to be seen.

    No iPad, I meant ageing, not aging. Thank you very much.

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    Posted
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl
  • Weather Preferences: Freezing fog, frost, snow, sunshine.
  • Location: Inbhir Nis / Inverness - 636 ft asl

    EDIT: off topic, I know but what does the last line of your signature say?

    It translates (literally) to 'up with the children of the stone' which means 'up with the Invernessians' (Invernessians are known romantically as children of the stone in Gaelic because of the Clach Na Cudainn, a stone that sits outside the Town House, embedded in its steps, it's sort of the White Tree of Gondor for Inverness haha). Can be used for anything but today of all days it's quite apt!

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    Posted
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter and dry and very warm in summer
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.

    It translates (literally) to 'up with the children of the stone' which means 'up with the Invernessians' (Invernessians are known romantically as children of the stone in Gaelic because of the Clach Na Cudainn, a stone that sits outside the Town House, embedded in its steps, it's sort of the White Tree of Gondor for Inverness haha). Can be used for anything but today of all days it's quite apt!

    Thanks for your interesting reply :)

    Are your family 'indigenous' (not the correct word but you follow) to Inverness? Or the highland area in general....

    Gaelic being quite an influence and all.

    I've never met anyone who can speak Gaelic.

    I find Family trees etc to be very interesting. I note that this is a political thread so maybe I should stop this conversation here but it's fairly quiet... (Compared to a 'debate' night anyway)

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    Posted
  • Location: Aberdeen
  • Location: Aberdeen

    It translates (literally) to 'up with the children of the stone' which means 'up with the Invernessians' (Invernessians are known romantically as children of the stone in Gaelic because of the Clach Na Cudainn, a stone that sits outside the Town House, embedded in its steps, it's sort of the White Tree of Gondor for Inverness haha). Can be used for anything but today of all days it's quite apt!

    I didn't know any of that! Thanks for sharing. What's the Gaelic for "Super Caley go ballistic Celtic were atrocious"? ;)

    Actually on a different note and a touch more on topic, and I know there are issues with this, but I would like to see Gaelic being taught more widely in schools across Scotland. Just a personal point of view rather than a strongly held political belief (likewise in NI state schools). It is one of my regrets that my knowledge of Gaelic is rather limited.

    Edited by doctormog
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    Posted
  • Location: NH7256
  • Weather Preferences: where's my vote?
  • Location: NH7256

    Jeez I don't think I've seen anything quite so bloody sordid as the clip involving Millicent on the from of the Graun web just now.  My dinner nearly made a reappearance.

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    Actually on a different note and a touch more on topic, and I know there are issues with this, but I would like to see Gaelic being taught more widely in schools across Scotland. Just a personal point of view rather than a strongly held political belief (likewise in NI state schools). It is one of my regrets that my knowledge of Gaelic is rather limited.

     

    I'd agree on this; likewise I've a similar regret.

     

    As an 'option' in Schools certainly. That and Lowland Scots (although there are a lot of variations on this; Gaelic having more formalisation I understand).

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    Jeez I don't think I've seen anything quite so bloody sordid as the clip involving Millicent on the from of the Graun web just now.  My dinner nearly made a reappearance.

     

    Maybe he was trying the #sexysocialism thing like angrysalmond?

     

    https://twitter.com/angrysalmond

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    Posted
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter and dry and very warm in summer
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.

    I'd agree on this; likewise I've a similar regret.

     

    As an 'option' in Schools certainly. That and Lowland Scots (although there are a lot of variations on this; Gaelic having more formalisation I understand).

    We've touched on this before.

    I'm undecided on this really. I definitely feel the same way re zero Gaelic knowledge really, which is a shame.

    On the other hand, what benefit is it providing. By that I mean is it more worthwhile to learn Gaelic than to learn French or German etc? Since time is very limited in schools.

    It would be good for each region to have an 'old' language introduced or whatever. We had burns reading with poetry in our primary school so I suppose we had some level of 'scots' language.

    What was the extent of Gaelic speaking? I'm thinking that down here it was more french linked since the Anglo saxons traded with us etc

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    You already learn a few Gaelic words / words of Gaelic origin when learning 'Scottish Standard English'.

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Scottish_Gaelic_origin

     

    It's intimately linked to Lowland Scots and therefore Scottish English. Lowland Scots is to an extent a transition from Northumbrian old English to Gaelic with some (Norman) French thrown in for good measure.*

     

    Loch is the classic. The 'ch' sound isn't in English which is why Scots say it without trouble, but English Standard English speakers tend to struggle and say 'Lock'.

     

    ---

     

    *e.g. Dinnae fash yersel.

     

    I understand 'fash' comes from fâché which means to get angry / worked up.

     

    The Bruce - with his good Scots name - was of course, erm, 'de Brus'...

    Edited by scottish skier
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    Posted
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter and dry and very warm in summer
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.

    You already learn a few Gaelic words / words of Gaelic origin when learning 'Scottish Standard English'.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of English_words_of_Scottish_Gaelic_origin

    It's intimately linked to Lowland Scots and therefore Scottish English. Lowland Scots is to an extent a transition from Northumbrian old English to Gaelic with some (Norman) French thrown in for good measure.*

    Loch is the classic. The 'ch' sound isn't in English which is why Scots say it without trouble, but English Standard English speakers tend to struggle and say 'Lock'.

    ---

    *e.g. Dinnae fash yersel.

    I understand 'fash' comes from fâché which means to get angry / worked up.

    The Bruce - with his good Scots name

    was of course, erm, 'de Brus'...

    My surname is Waugh so I'm well aware haha

    My dad says 'Wau' basically since he can't say the 'gh' ending properly. I reckon he could say it now since he's lived here

    over 20 years and certain words he says with a Scottish twang (used to stay in the Glasgow area for a while) but actually totally reverts back to a strongly slightly posh English way of saying the name.

    As you noted, Scottish people, like myself have no problem making the 'gh' sound properly quite similar to your example of Loch.

    The name is from Northen England/Southern Scotland so I note the overlap.

    A bit like how in Northern England they have the 'ough' sound on the end of a lot of place names

    Only example off the top of my head is 'myerscough' pronounced myers-coe as in somebody & co.

    I find this kind of stuff interesting.

    I haven't heard of 'fash' in that context before.

    Living with my flatmates I've picked up sound new terms. One has a little knowledge of Dorach (sorry for the horrible attempt at spelling, I think I'm wrong. Old Aberdeenshire accent).

    'Barry' meaning great is used by my friend from Kirkcaldy.

    Etc etc.

    The Dumfries terms are quite horrible. 'Mun' added on to some sentences (link there with Newcastle i suspect).

    The Limmy show did a great impression of the 'Dundee' area accent. Around that neck of the woods anyway, with most words split in two. If anyone's interested you type in Limmy show - annoying accent or 'that accent' and it should come up on YouTube.

    Edited by SW Saltire
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    Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    The Limmy show did a great impression of the 'Dundee' area accent. 

     

    Aye, If your surname is Dick and you live in Dundee, don't call your daughter Emma...

    Edited by scottish skier
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    Posted
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter and dry and very warm in summer
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.

    That'll be the Doric yer spikkin aboot loon.

     

    Yeah, this....

     

    Aye, If your surname is Dick and you live in Dundee, don't call your daughter Emma...

    Quite. I'd actually change my name by d-poll
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    Posted
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire
  • Weather Preferences: Winter: Cold & Snowy, Summer: Just not hot
  • Location: Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

    Can we get back on topic please guys?

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    Posted
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold in winter and dry and very warm in summer
  • Location: Dumfries, South West Scotland.

    Can we get back on topic please guys?

    Fair enough, but I didn't see it detracting from political debate. If new polls had been posted or some political rambling I'd have stopped...

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    Posted
  • Location: Lochgelly - Highest town in Fife at 150m ASL.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold. Enjoy all extremes though.
  • Location: Lochgelly - Highest town in Fife at 150m ASL.

    I remember  my mother-in-law, during a heated exchange with my father-in-law shouting what sounded like  "coch ma hoan?" as he exited the door.   Had to ask what that meant of course and she laughingly told me it meant   'kiss my ass!'  :D So that was my one and only Gaelic lesson! 

    Agree though, should be an option in schools.  Nice to hear the Welsh speak in their native tongue.

     

    OOps just saw Nick's request......I'll get ma shawl!

    Edited by Blitzen
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    Posted
  • Location: NH7256
  • Weather Preferences: where's my vote?
  • Location: NH7256

    Ok.

     

    Jim Murphy. LOL.

     

    NooLabor :bad:  Gimme back my party, shysters.

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    Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    Banter is a key component of Scottish politics...

     

    anyhoo...

     

    Studiously on topic post.

     

    May2015 are damn confident. Much more so than us nail biters up here.

     

    http://may2015.com/featured/election-2015-stunning-ashcroft-polls-show-the-snp-could-win-every-seat-in-scotland/

     

    Election 2015: Stunning Ashcroft polls show the SNP could win every seat in Scotland
     
    A third round of Ashcroft polls has confirmed what May2015 has predicted since February: the SNP are headed for at least 50 seats...
     
    ...After Ashcroft’s first batch of Scottish polls were leaked at midnight on February 4, we extrapolated them to suggest the SNP would win 56 seats, as per the graphic below. Since then May2015 has predicted 54-56 wins. (We will predict 55 wins after today’s results have been added, with three seats changing hands.)

     

     

    I'd be over the moon with 30. Add in Murphy having a Portillo moment and that would be the icing on the cake.

    Edited by scottish skier
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    Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    NooLabor :bad:  

     

    noolabour.scot

     

    jimmurphy.bru

     

    mcmurphyforscotland.haggis

     

    JS52973306.jpg 2582B83E00000578-2946348-Labour_leader_i

     

    etc.

     

    ---

     

    snp.scot

     

    ?

     

    This web page is not available

    ERR_NAME_NOT_RESOLVED

    Jim / New Labour will be whoever you want them to be.

     

    Or at least what the latest focus group suggests that is. And for electoral purposes only.

     

    I mean who in earth said to Jim 'I've got it! Jim, you need to change your website to .scot, put on a Scotland top and drink Irn Bru at photo opportunities! That'll have them swinging back to Labour in no time! After all, that's what Scottish folk do right?'.

     

    I suspect Jim probably said this to himself, in front of the mirror, looking at the hair going grey in a matter of months. Unless he previously used Just for Men ginger.

    Edited by scottish skier
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    Posted
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl
  • Location: Near Lauder, SE Scotland, 175 m asl

    Just going to throw this in here.

     

    My local MSP, Christine Graham in the post iref debate.

     

    Born in 1944 incidentally (for those who read my historical / demographic ramblings).

     

    I hope she stands again in 2016. She'll get my vote.

     

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