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The £6 Gallon Has Arrived!

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It looks like the £6 gallon has finally arrived without a whimper of protest. It has seriously changed my driving style and how many times I use the car outside of work. I have even taken to using our second car (SAAB diesel) to try and eek out the miles but still face a bill of around £65.00 a week just to get to work and back.

Are you doing anything different now to help the soaring cost of motoring and how it affects your personal budgeting?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1364529/The-6-gallon-arrived-Petrol-price-hits-historic-high.html?ITO=1490

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I wonder why there haven't been any protests like there were in 2008 - have people just accepted the rising cost of fuel along with the cost of living ?

I was just reading this ....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12664047

...maybe I will dust my bike off for the summer or just use Shanks's pony !

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Are you doing anything different now to help the soaring cost of motoring and how it affects your personal budgeting?

http://www.dailymail...h.html?ITO=1490

Yeah, i got rid of my car last sept and now walk and cycle everywhere. Get shopping and the like delivered and its saving me around £400 a month atleast!!

I totally accept not everyone can do such a radical step but for me i live in city centre in Glasgow and only have a 12mile round trip to cycle to work so its pretty easy for myself.

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Aah good ol' BP, screwed up in the Gulf, lost lots of money, turned in profit, and is charging phenomenal prices. That's 13p/litre more than down here. :(

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Not everyone can use bicycles or buses. Out in the countryside there is real poverty where people can't access buses to get to work and don't earn enough to run a car. So they are basically stuck.

People in cities can do without cars.

But it seems people have no appetite for protest anymore. One economist said that in a year or so there will be food riots in the UK....ha,ha, ha! What a joke!

We can't riot about anything anymore, just a load of sheep.

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As some others already know, I am very pessimistic about the future of motoring. In decades to come, I see motoring surviving but purely as a means of getting from A to B, and primarily reserved for business use. Recreational trips out (e.g. to the cinema or to visit people in remote areas) are likely to become a thing of the past, and "pleasure driving" is likely to become as anti-social as fox-hunting, partly for environmental reasons and partly by association with reckless thrill seekers. As fuel gets more expensive and businesses risk being priced into trouble, draconian measures are likely to step up, e.g. retests every 5 years to enforce smooth driving styles, a national speed limit of 40mph or lower, en-masse replacement of 30mph zones with 5-15mph traffic-calmed zones, and maybe even World War II style rationing, where car use is only allowed if it's work-related. I don't deny that this policy direction will probably make many residential areas safer and more pleasant to live in, but it will have myriad side-effects including hitting the leisure side of the economy very hard and disproportionately hurting people living in rural areas.

I don't think much of this is actually necessary- I think there is room to explore avenues of trying to hone cars into more of a recreationally based tool, recognising that the benefits of social-recreational car use are benefits rather than "needless waste", using modern technology to reduce the need for business-related travel, and promoting public transport, walking and cycling as good ways of getting from A to B plus the recreational side of walking & cycling. Combined with measures to make vehicles less pollutive, this policy direction may substantially reduce the need for draconian measures in the long run. However, for this to happen it requires changes to the "business is God" model of today's society, which is why I'm pessimistic.

But on the bright side, at least the current reality, though tricky for motorists on marginal incomes, isn't anywhere near as gloomy as my vision of the future!

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Aah good ol' BP, screwed up in the Gulf, lost lots of money, turned in profit, and is charging phenomenal prices. That's 13p/litre more than down here. :(

70% is tax and what 30% of that goes on the road repair ? So Petrol is a government cash cow.

Could image what would happen in the USA if Tax approached say 50% on Petrol ?.

I am luck my mileage will go down from 350 miles a week (work) to 25 miles (new job but far more train travel)

Why we 'put up with it' I don't know

Of to sisters now 1hr by car 4.5 hrs by train.

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I filled up with the expensive diesel (Shell V-power) by mistake the other week and was initially horrified at the price, but I'm now using it all the time, as it's less than 5% extra in cost but gives over 15% more mpg than before. Is anyone else using this, and how can they do it? It could be that I'm just more concious of the cost of fuel now and am driving more steadily, but it does seem to be making a genuine difference.

I'm sure it's massively overpriced and they could provide this at standard for almost no extra cost, but whilst that's not an option, I'm going to carry on using it.

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Two possible explanations for why there haven't been fuel protests this year:

1. Plenty of other things to protest about (lots of recent demonstrations over cuts)

2. It isn't primarily the Government's fault (fuel prices shot up early in New Labour's reign because of a fuel duty escalator at 6% above inflation each year, while in the last decade the government has tended to raise fuel taxes by no more than inflation, and our fuel prices are no longer extortionate compared to the rest of Europe).

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Asda sold 12.9p petrol by mistake in Bradford

Asda has admitted drivers paid just 12.9p a litre for petrol after staff put a decimal point in the wrong place.

About 50 motorists stocked up on unleaded fuel at the petrol station in Rooley Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, on Thursday.

Drivers queued up to use the automatic card-payment pumps for about two hours until the mistake was spotted.

Some motorists also filled up petrol cans with the bargain fuel after word spread around the city.

An Asda spokesman said: "For a couple of hours some lucky customers got some petrol at the wrong price at our Rooley Lane store."

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Asda sold 12.9p petrol by mistake in Bradford

Asda has admitted drivers paid just 12.9p a litre for petrol after staff put a decimal point in the wrong place.

About 50 motorists stocked up on unleaded fuel at the petrol station in Rooley Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, on Thursday.

Drivers queued up to use the automatic card-payment pumps for about two hours until the mistake was spotted.

Some motorists also filled up petrol cans with the bargain fuel after word spread around the city.

An Asda spokesman said: "For a couple of hours some lucky customers got some petrol at the wrong price at our Rooley Lane store."

Brilliant!

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