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Hi Kiwi...no not really! The suburbs on the river front and the city centre had to contend with some icy patches only, which looked like light frost. Once the sun broke thru a couple of hours after su

What a pretty chart. Top End monsoon - late as it was - feeds into east coast trough. Bushfires will be heavily subdued.  

Part 3  End. Launceston, Tasmania. That feeling of witnessing snow for the very first time in your home environment.   

Posted Images

http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2015/jul/17/rare-snow-in-australia-as-antarctic-chill-sweeps-eastern-states

 

 

Snow has fallen in parts of Australia where such falls are so rare the weather bureau does not have the tools to measure it as temperatures plunged to more than 10 degrees below average.

 

 

Temperatures have plummeted to more than 10 degrees below average in places, while Sydney has had its coldest July weather in 44 years

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hobart abuzz with the prospect of a once in a generation weather event. A no sleep Sunday night coming up!

 

 

Hobart braces for snowy start to working week
  • HELEN KEMPTON
  • Mercury
  • August 01, 2015 12:00AM
592396-3ab7d6c0-374e-11e5-85c8-0a0c9a231

Snowy Hobart back in July 1986.

 

HOBARTIANS may not have to climb Mt Wellington to play in the snow on Monday with weather experts forecasting it may fall, and settle, across the city for the first time in almost 30 years.

 

The Bureau of Meteorology’s Tasmanian director John Bally forecast that a blast of cold air would bring low-level snow to the city on Monday and highland roads across Tasmania could be closed for several days

http://www.themercury.com.au/news/tasmania/hobart-braces-for-snowy-start-to-working-week/story-fnj4f7k1-1227465586599

Edited by Styx
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Sunday night 1030pm: Snow is falling in downtown Hobart ( sealevel ) for first time since 2008. It's trying very hard to settle. Everything is going to plan for the first settled fall here as low as the waterfront in 29 years. Presently 2.1C with the colder air to come overnight after the trough line, which should produce more muscular showers than we've already had. If snow settles in Hobart it will be the first capital city snow since Canberra in 2000 ( although they are at 600m asl, so an unfair advantage )...still, an interesting fact. An unbearably exciting night ahead eventhough it would be helpful to have a bit of sleep.  .

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Sunday night 1030pm: Snow is falling in downtown Hobart ( sealevel ) for first time since 2008. It's trying very hard to settle. Everything is going to plan for the first settled fall here as low as the waterfront in 29 years. Presently 2.1C with the colder air to come overnight after the trough line, which should produce more muscular showers than we've already had. If snow settles in Hobart it will be the first capital city snow since Canberra in 2000 ( although they are at 600m asl, so an unfair advantage )...still, an interesting fact. An unbearably exciting night ahead eventhough it would be helpful to have a bit of sleep.  .

 

Styx,

 

Any lampposts to report? Otherwise a powerful torch pointed out the window should do the trick

 

After 20 years you must be getting excited!

 

Keep us posted

Edited by Midlands Ice Age
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Monday 5am: Regretfully there is no snow on the ground at my Battery Point location near the seafront in the city. Just after midnight there was a snow shower but its been a mostly dry night with precipitation falling as snow confined to the mountain range but to very low levels including most slightly elevated suburbs. There is good prospects for progress this morning in a strengthening SW ( cold ) wind on the back end of the low which will push that snowfall right across the city. Snow has fallen across most of Tasmania overnight at or very close to sealevel which is unusually extensive. Nothing seen like that since the early 1990s or before I suspect. Major road closures including notable arterial ones connecting different regions of the island. And of course anyone living on a slight hill in Hobart will be having a snow day today. It will be daybreak shortly so the reports and photos of the snow situation will come flooding in. I won't yet rank this snow event in terms of historical significance for the city as I suspect there's a bit more room for improvement. Currently 2.6C, wind light westerly, Mountain summit (1270m) -7.5C and still dropping up there!

 

Midlands Ice Age....No street lamp view from my place! Had to be hardy and brave the cold. Actually 2.6C isn't too bad.

Dancerwings....Nice to hear you paid Tasmania a visit  ( most leave the island off their itinerary )...you must come back sometime!  

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Snowy Tasmania

 

post-1808-0-15057600-1438586913_thumb.jp

 

post-1808-0-07479100-1438586941_thumb.jp

 

Hi Styx......Going by the photos, some places have seen snow down to sea level... anything on the ground at Battery point?

Edited by Kiwi
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Hi Kiwi...no not really! The suburbs on the river front and the city centre had to contend with some icy patches only, which looked like light frost. Once the sun broke thru a couple of hours after sunrise it melted away very quickly. The first picture is near where I live and the other is at Rosny Point on the eastern shore. So how rare was this snow- turned icy- frost looking substance in the city? It may exceed what happened in 2005 for being more widespread but I'm sure during the 1990s this happened two or three times ( and each decade beforehand - low level snow has become very rare in the last two and three decades here! ). The last measurable snow Hobart city got on the waters edge was 8cm in 1986. I think the record is 25cm in the first half of the 19th century.

 

ground_zpsfjkegcpr.pngaustralia_zps6dskn18w.jpg

 

Hobart's elevated areas got more snow. There was a good blanket of it  ( like a very heavy frost ) down to 100m elevation or less. This may exceed the 2005 event - but matching some falls of the early-mid 1990s this low. So these photos are near 100m-150m

 

samroswarne_zps3gwfgvry.jpgjennifertuyogen_zpsh6gvecna.jpg

 

These pictures are from a bit higher up in the highest suburbs ( near 300m ). Several centimetres and more of snow. Snow will usually settle at this level two or three times a year, but the quantity yesterday and last night was good, closing some schools and stopping traffic for a time.

 

kerrygodfrey_zpseckhc6an.jpgmtnelson_zpsg8wwr5eb.jpgalexjohnstonabc_zpsoh3ktdzi.png

 

The sealevel snow pictures which Kiwi  put up are from places about 20km down river from Hobart, closer to where river meets the ocean. These areas are much more susceptible to rain and snow in the prevailing winds ( Hobart is kind of sheltered by the mountain ). It is the most widespread snow settling at sealevel since at least 2005, maybe early 1990s.

 

jessicahinchliffe_zpsvxkogita.jpg

 

The very low snow was widespread right across north, west, central and southern Tasmania probably not seen for extent down low since the early 1990s.

The heaviest snow was at 500-1000m, very small communities, wilderness areas. There's probably better pictures around...

 

wendymorris_zpscjcb542y.jpg

 

Another strong cold outbreak is forecast for tonight and tomorrow with snow to 100m level. I don't think I'll post anything then unless the forecast is an underestimation and Hobart city manages to pull off the first measurable snow in 30 years... so here's hoping..

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Thanks for that, Styx...I haven't seen that much snow since at least 2013! :D

 

Ha, yea no doubt, thought I'd update what happened anyway, we were all hoping for a bit more but the official forecasts were actually spot on. The best lowest elevation snow of the 21st century anyway for us .We have our own versions of Mr Madden springing up so sometimes its hard not to get slightly over excited. 

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Ha, yea no doubt, thought I'd update what happened anyway, we were all hoping for a bit more but the official forecasts were actually spot on. The best lowest elevation snow of the 21st century anyway for us .We have our own versions of Mr Madden springing up so sometimes its hard not to get slightly over excited. 

Glad you got some...Did Ken Ring get it right? :D

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Glad you got some...Did Ken Ring get it right? :D

 

Oh God, don't bring him into it. I've had him turn up with name mention before, only to bash mainstream meteorology and extoll his own silly methods. Did you know he had a lucrative career as a psychic before turning to weather forecasting? He even had a book on palmistry for cats! And people still take him seriously!!!

 

For anyone that wants to feel a better connection to their cat, here's the amazon page: Pawmistry: How to Read Your Cat's Paws

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Hi Kiwi...no not really! The suburbs on the river front and the city centre had to contend with some icy patches only, which looked like light frost. Once the sun broke thru a couple of hours after sunrise it melted away very quickly. The first picture is near where I live and the other is at Rosny Point on the eastern shore. So how rare was this snow- turned icy- frost looking substance in the city? It may exceed what happened in 2005 for being more widespread but I'm sure during the 1990s this happened two or three times ( and each decade beforehand - low level snow has become very rare in the last two and three decades here! ). The last measurable snow Hobart city got on the waters edge was 8cm in 1986. I think the record is 25cm in the first half of the 19th century.

 

ground_zpsfjkegcpr.pngaustralia_zps6dskn18w.jpg

 

Hobart's elevated areas got more snow. There was a good blanket of it  ( like a very heavy frost ) down to 100m elevation or less. This may exceed the 2005 event - but matching some falls of the early-mid 1990s this low. So these photos are near 100m-150m

 

samroswarne_zps3gwfgvry.jpgjennifertuyogen_zpsh6gvecna.jpg

 

These pictures are from a bit higher up in the highest suburbs ( near 300m ). Several centimetres and more of snow. Snow will usually settle at this level two or three times a year, but the quantity yesterday and last night was good, closing some schools and stopping traffic for a time.

 

kerrygodfrey_zpseckhc6an.jpgmtnelson_zpsg8wwr5eb.jpgalexjohnstonabc_zpsoh3ktdzi.png

 

The sealevel snow pictures which Kiwi  put up are from places about 20km down river from Hobart, closer to where river meets the ocean. These areas are much more susceptible to rain and snow in the prevailing winds ( Hobart is kind of sheltered by the mountain ). It is the most widespread snow settling at sealevel since at least 2005, maybe early 1990s.

 

jessicahinchliffe_zpsvxkogita.jpg

 

The very low snow was widespread right across north, west, central and southern Tasmania probably not seen for extent down low since the early 1990s.

The heaviest snow was at 500-1000m, very small communities, wilderness areas. There's probably better pictures around...

 

wendymorris_zpscjcb542y.jpg

 

Another strong cold outbreak is forecast for tonight and tomorrow with snow to 100m level. I don't think I'll post anything then unless the forecast is an underestimation and Hobart city manages to pull off the first measurable snow in 30 years... so here's hoping..

More pictures of snowy surfers http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-08-03/snow-across-tasmania-forces-many-key-road-closures/6666838

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Hi Styx

 

Are you seeing more 'polar outbreaks' reaching Tasmania and southern Oz this winter or have we just had a couple of 'freak' events? With the ongoing Nino in force are cold outbreaks a go to or , again, is this just a 'freak' event?

 

I watch Antarctica and saw a huge drop off in sea ice when Oz has its snow a couple of weeks back so I was wondering if this system also left Antarctica importing warm air masses?

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Hi Gray-Wolf, I'm afraid I don't have the knowledge to answer those technical questions with any authority so my thoughts aren't that advanced. I would be skeptical about drawing a parallel between Antarctic sea ice decline and polar outbreaks in SE Australia because of the huge distances and areas involved, plus the fact that the two or three very cold air upper air parcels we've seen this season have shot up primarily in a line into the south east. Perhaps its just a case of a fortuitous alignment.  I thought there would be more local and regional weather patterns at play which would determine snowfall quantities in combination with that cold air reaching Australian waters, one of them might be warmer than normal Southern Ocean SST? But looking back at winter history in Australia this might be considered a moderately good year ( and nothing more ) based on locations that have seen snow down low. I am going with the fluke scenario. Much smaller areas have seen unusually heavier falls but that's what makes the news I guess. It's just been such a spectacular ( and historical ) few years of an absence of these wintry blasts that has made this year standout as something special in my view.  

 

 

 

* BOM has issued a weather statement in relation to the snow that affected NSW last month. I notice they didn't include it in their Significant Climate statements which they release whenever an event is  "unusual in the historical context...of region". A look back thru the archive shows cold weather events have previously been listed so last month's event didn't make the grade. I would be surprised in the Tasmania snow met the benchmark for a listing either. Anyhow short statement here 

A significant low-level snow event across eastern Australia 11-17/7

http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/updates/articles/a011-eastern-snow-event.shtml

Edited by Styx
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Polar outbreaks here are quite different than the type you get in the UK due to vast areas of ocean to all points south. Still getting my head around how it al works down here ! It is fascinating though and great to live in a part of oz with snow potential in winter essentially on our doorstep. It has been a colder winter this year in south East oz tham for many years partic in tassie victoria and South Australia although perhaps reflective of the run of warmer than average winters prior. Hard to know if El Niño has had anything to do with it.

Edited by Upgrade
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Tasmania has just recorded its coldest August temperature on record... -11.1C at Liawenee ( 1000m asl ) in the central Great Lake region. There is half a metre of snow on the ground up there from the start of the week. Tasmania's previous August low was -11.0C in the same district but at another station ( now closed ) in 1974.   

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  • 3 weeks later...

Unseasonably severe storms hit areas of NSW and inland parts of far southern QLD yesterday (Monday). Isolated severe storms also affected inland parts of northern NSW on Sunday evening.

 

Of particular note was a storm which produced a tornado near the inland NSW city of Dubbo -


Most definitely a chance that other storms could have produced a tornado, but if it doesn't occur near a town then it'll usually go unheard of.

 

The town of Murrurundi in the Upper Hunter Valley was hit by a supercell storm in the evening bringing hail up to and possibly larger than tennis ball size -
11891088_10206676542939740_356522595274911933477_884130525016069_591162077717524
(Source of both photos: Higgins Storm Chasing - Facebook)

 

Sydney was also affected by some strong storms -

 

Plenty of other images and some videos of the storms across social media.

 

An East Coast Low developed off the southern coast of NSW late yesterday and has brought heavy rain and some flooding to that area. Nowra has had just over 300mm associated with that system -

 

 

Cloudcover ruined the storm potential here yesterday with only thundery rain affecting us. And in contrast to the Illawarra and South Coast, today was a sunny and warm day on the north coast with temperatures almost reaching 29 degrees.

~~~~~~~~~

 

In the local area, this winter has been pretty uneventful. It's been a fairly dry winter overall, with us currently sitting nearly 185mm below the winter average.
There was a largely unexpected thunderstorm earlier this month here that did get the 2015/2016 storm season underway. It was a high-based and low-precipitating storm (unphotogenic) but the cluster of storms produced a reasonable amount of lightning -

M5kzU8i.jpg

YnhaRYL.jpg

FBNgEZP.png

Edited by NorthNSW
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Tasmania had its 6th coldest winter on record and the coldest since 1966. Not all stations recorded such a sharp cold anomaly, Hobart for example has had a few winters since that year that have been colder. August was more impressive everywhere; the third coldest on record measured Tasmania wide and the coldest since the late 1970s, including Hobart.

 

taswinter_zpsc8wvnipd.png

 

Across Australia it was a different story. Only Victoria was anomalously cold ( the coldest winter since 1997 ) but a huge swathe of oranges and yellows from west to east, Western Australia had its second warmest winter on record, and Queensland was notably warm.

 

tempaus_zpsxdsq3kkf.gif

auswinter_zpslgatphk7.png

 

Australia wide anomaly ( 61-90 comparisons )

June 2015:  +1.4

July 2015: +0.4

August 2015: +0.6

 

winterrain_zpsp3fvnsjg.gif

Rainfall -16% below average

Edited by Styx
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Severe storms impacted the local region yesterday (Sept 17th) with hail up to almost 10cm in diameter being observed at the small

coastal village of Red Rock around midday (not far north of Woolgoolga). Hail was reported from a number of other places, varying in size and ground coverage.
Red Rock
12042643_10207921908468742_6039477589608

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ncscsocial/permalink/887171531319681/ (Video, need to be logged into Facebook to view it)
12002100_10207921908908753_8951349855184

12036981_10207921908628746_5874901088758
(All photos above, Source: North Coast Storm Chasers Social - Facebook)
Red Rock again
12011405_881513498608061_243976694388972
(Source: South Brisbane Storms - Facebook)
Corindi
r1476047_21620790.jpg
(Source: ABC Coffs Coast)

12047110_10153698246963159_5768070170679

(Source: Coffs Coast Advocate - Facebook)
Grafton
12009640_10205920902195860_8996120988469

(Source: Higgins Storm Chasing - Facebook)

12036725_996633073692242_792471010143140
(Source: North Coast Storm Chasers Social - Facebook)

Ulmarra (near Grafton)

12019752_1042233362483560_72970237892379
(Source: North Coast Storm Chasers Social - Facebook)

 

Hail Storm Wrecks Havoc, by Fi Poole, 18th September 10:11AM
http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2015/09/18/4315153.htm
Parts of the Mid North Coast looked like snowfields after a heavy hail storm swept through the region. The storm hit Corindi's blueberry

industry the hardest, causing millions in damage.

Severe thunderstorms along the Mid North Coast on Thursday caused isolated damage from Foster through to Grafton.
A caller into ABC NSW Drive program was in his car when the storm hit Nabiac.
"Hail as big as golf balls came down, it was deafening, and now we have dents in the roof," Ray McDonald said.
"We were stuck on the side of the road for about 15 minutes.
"Whole hillsides were white; it was if we were in the snowfields."

North of Coffs Harbour in Corindi, the blueberry fields were battered by the hail.
"It was twenty five minutes of cricket ball size hail, plus damaging winds which devastated eighty per cent of our crop," Ganesh Singh,

Director of OzGroup Berries said.
"In this area we have five farms on our road, and after the storm everyone was out trying to get the hail out of their bird netting.
"We've lost in the order of three to four hundred thousand dollars, plus repair costs on top of that.
"We've also got macadamias which were in full flower, and most of the flowers are now on the ground, so next year's crop isn't looking too

good either."
Raspberry, cucumber, and tomato hot houses in Corindi were also damaged.
Ganesh Singh estimates that the cost of the hail storm will exceed fifty million dollars.
Federal Member for Cowper Luke Hartsuyker phoned farmers on Friday morning to gauge the extent of the damage.
"I will be speaking to the Federal Agriculture Minister to discuss what sort of assistance may be available given the losses being

reported," he said.

Further north the severe thunderstorm passed over Grafton Racetrack as Race Four was underway.
Jockeys Jasen Watkins and Darren Jones were both thrown from their horses as they raced in the pouring rain.
Darren Jones' horse injured itself after being spooked by the hail and sadly, it had to be put down after the race.
"There was no indication that this particular part of the storm was going to make the late turn and come to Grafton," Michael Beattie from

the Clarence River Jockey Club said.
The track was inspected after the storm and the race meeting abandoned because of the amount of hail on the track.

 

Article with more detail about the Horse Races incident at Grafton:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-18/horse-put-down-after-hail-strikes-racecourse/6785572
The storm was not unexpected in Grafton, they had a good 30 minutes to take pre-emptive action (storm hit just before 2pm). They

prioritised money over safety (you can see on the lightning animation below it was producing a decent amount of lightning too), so the no lightning/thunder thing is untrue. Similar sentiment shared by those living in Grafton on the local newspaper website, you could definitely tell a storm was coming.

Radar loop animation (click to make it bigger)(Btw, the radar is just north of Grafton. Rain echoes southwards of about Kempsey are beyond the optimal range of this radar)
NW8bOjP.gif

Radar loop animation with lightning overlay
VHuvClY.gif

 

Further south in the Hunter region around Newcastle, storms brought smaller hail but were slower moving allowing for some decent

accumulation of hailstones at some places.
At Bateau Bay12025313_10205957159861957_1952212438_n.12004721_10153569045528632_142426496930612011399_1024861557544378_80498199787279
(All above photos, Source: 2GO 107.7FM - Facebook)

 

 

Yesterday's storm activity and rain brought 44mm here, which was our wettest September day since 1998 (17 years). On average, September is the driest month of the year here and it is quite unusual to get heavy falls during this month. As you can see, it is notably drier than every other month of the year -
TW8zBOR.png

Edited by NorthNSW
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