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jello

Northern Ireland Water

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Getting out of hand now. Tho to be honest I am glad of no water in my own house as you can see from the pictures below. Tho I would like some in my temp accommodation. NI Water has increased the number of homes with restricted supplies to almost 60,000 on Thursday evening due to the loss of an important reservoir in south Belfast.

The problem has resulted in a rise from 33,000 affected households to 58,300, the agency in charge of the region's supplies said.

Following an executive meeting on Thursday afternoon, the Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinesss also said: "People need to be held to account at NI Water." "The crisis should have been anticipated"

However, NI Water said: "Due to higher than expected demand there has been an unexpected loss of water to an important service reservoir which serves South Belfast."

"As a result we have had to increase the number of properties with restricted supplies from 33,000 to 58,300. Engineers are currently working to resolve this and a further update will be provided as soon as possible."

Its bad rather bad chistmas. Sorry to put a downer on things people.

post-7789-0-30578500-1293752743_thumb.jp post-7789-0-89753400-1293752860_thumb.jp post-7789-0-81449900-1293752886_thumb.jp post-7789-0-12654700-1293752906_thumb.jp post-7789-0-32853900-1293752938_thumb.jp

HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE

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I have no knowledge of NI water what so ever so no idea of the general state of its network. But the process of rotational cuts to supply is the correct procedure to follow when supply is unable to meet demand. In some circumstances decisions are made to shut in or take a service reservoir out of the system and water simply pumped direct to customers. I am not sure what context 'losing a reservoir is used' but it should certainly never be allowed to run dry as that causes all sorts of problems so you would always have the valves closed before that happened.

Having been part of the management of London's water for 15 years we had rough contingencies for situations like this, but it is not possible to have exact plans in advance because you don't know where the area of impact will be. Water distribution systems can be very complex mainly because these have been added too since Victorian times, growing like spiders for 150yrs in all directions.

Rotational cuts is not something any water company wants to do, and there is a culture of management ordering staff to take systems to the wire before taking action.

As I say I have no knowledge of the NI network but can say it could certainly happen in London and has come seriously close on one or two occasions over the last decade or so.

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Not only place having problems. Quite a few places on the mainland are also having problems due to bad maintenance.

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I have no knowledge of NI water what so ever so no idea of the general state of its network. But the process of rotational cuts to supply is the correct procedure to follow when supply is unable to meet demand. In some circumstances decisions are made to shut in or take a service reservoir out of the system and water simply pumped direct to customers. I am not sure what context 'losing a reservoir is used' but it should certainly never be allowed to run dry as that causes all sorts of problems so you would always have the valves closed before that happened.

Having been part of the management of London's water for 15 years we had rough contingencies for situations like this, but it is not possible to have exact plans in advance because you don't know where the area of impact will be. Water distribution systems can be very complex mainly because these have been added too since Victorian times, growing like spiders for 150yrs in all directions.

Rotational cuts is not something any water company wants to do, and there is a culture of management ordering staff to take systems to the wire before taking action.

As I say I have no knowledge of the NI network but can say it could certainly happen in London and has come seriously close on one or two occasions over the last decade or so.

I sympathise with anyone without water, especially those with young children or the infirm where hygiene is particularly important.

Is it correct (something that I believe I heard on the television the other day when I was passing through the room and was not paying full

attention)- that in Northern Ireland households are not billed for their water supply. If this is true how does this work? Are they automatically deducted through the taxation system a sum to cover this expenditure, or is it something that is subsidised by the rest of the United Kingdom? I am not begrudging subsidisation if that is the case, but I am just curious to know.

Kind Regards

Dave

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I sympathise with anyone without water, especially those with young children or the infirm where hygiene is particularly important.

Is it correct (something that I believe I heard on the television the other day when I was passing through the room and was not paying full

attention)- that in Northern Ireland households are not billed for their water supply. If this is true how does this work? Are they automatically deducted through the taxation system a sum to cover this expenditure, or is it something that is subsidised by the rest of the United Kingdom? I am not begrudging subsidisation if that is the case, but I am just curious to know.

Kind Regards

Dave

People in NI do not pay directly for their water it comes out of the rates.

So you heard correctly!

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We still pay for water it just doesn't come in a separate bill. Everything is included in one bill

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  • High pressure in the driving seat until at least the end of May

    High pressure continues to dominate our weather until at least early next week, with most staying dry and fine. The warm conditions will spread north, and the highest temperatures will transfer to the west as the high moves east and eventually over Scandinavia. Read the full update here

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