Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Somerset Squall

Record Quiet 2010 Hurricane/typhoon Season For Eastern And Western Pacific

Recommended Posts

Whilst it's been the 3rd most active season so far in the Atlantic, the 2010 East Pacific hurricane is pretty much guaranteed to be the quietest since records began (TC formation in November is rare). Not only this, the Western Pacific typhoon season this year is on course to be the quietest since records began too, unless 4 more named storms occur which is looking unlikely. To have both basins record breakingly quiet at the same time is unheard of, and if the Western Pacific has no more named storms it will smash the record quiet considerably.

A record quiet typhoon season

While the Atlantic has had its third busiest season on record this year, it has been a record quiet year for tropical cyclones in both the Eastern and Western Pacific. In the Western Pacific, it is currently the quietest typhoon season on record, according to statistics computed by forecaster Paul Stanko at the NWS office on Guam. On average, by this point in the season, there should have been 24.5 named storms, 16 typhoons, and 4 supertyphoons (storms with 150+ mph winds.) So far in 2010, there have been just 14 named storms, 8 typhoons, and 1 supertyphoon. The record lows for the Western Pacific (since 1951) are 18 named storms, 9 typhoons, and 0 supertyphoons. We have a good chance of beating or tying the records for fewest named storms and fewest typhoons, since there are no current threat areas, and none of the models are predicting tropical cyclone development over the next ten days.

A record quiet Eastern Pacific hurricane season

In the Eastern Pacific, it has also been a record-quiet season. On average, the Eastern Pacific has 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 3 intense hurricanes in a season. So far in 2010, there have been 7 named storms, 3 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes. The record quietest season since 1966 was the year 1977, when the Eastern Pacific had 8 named storms, 4 hurricanes, and 0 intense hurricanes. There is a good chance that the 2010 Eastern Pacific hurricane season is over, since we are already into mid-November, and November storms are quite rare in the Eastern Pacific. La Niña is largely responsible to the quiet Eastern Pacific hurricane season, due in part to the cool sea surface temperatures it brought. La Niña also commonly causes less active Western Pacific typhoon seasons, since the warmest waters there shift closer to Asia, reducing the amount of time storms have over water. Still, it is quite remarkable that both of these ocean basins are having record quiet seasons in the same year--there is no historical precedent for such an occurrence.

From Jeff Masters.

Another interesting thing to note is that the the record breakingly quiet 2010 East Pacific season contained a category 5 storm, which is rare itself in the East Pacific. June was record breakingly active, which really emphasises the complete halt in activity thereafter. It is thought the active start was the hang over from last year's El Nino, which causes above average activity across the Pacific ocean.

The Central Pacific had no named storms and not even a tropical depression. I will check, but this may be another record fallen too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

very interesting as to how quite its been, good for some countries that have been reapeatdly battered by these systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

very interesting as to how quite its been, good for some countries that have been reapeatdly battered by these systems.

Have look at what they were saying in 2004,5,6,7 re hurricanes and global warming

Got an explantion now, why it isnt happening :rolleyes:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101025152249.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...