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2010 Hurricane Season Facts

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It may not be 100% over this hurricane season but here are some interesting facts!!

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Nineteen named storms occurred during 2010. Since 1944, only 1995 (19) and 2005 (28) have had the same or more named storms.

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Nine named storms formed in the Main Development Region this year (Colin, Danielle, Earl, Fiona, Gaston, Igor, Julia, Lisa and Tomas). Only 1933 (11 storms) and 1995 (9 storms) have had as many named storms form in the MDR.

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88.25 named storm days occurred in 2010. This ties 2010 with 2008 for the 6th most named storm days in a single season since 1944.

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Twelve hurricanes occurred in 2010. Since 1944, only two seasons, 1969 (12) and 2005 (15) have had the same or more hurricanes in a single season.

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37.50 hurricane days occurred in 2010. This is the most hurricane days observed in a single season since 2005 (when 49.75 hurricane days were recorded).

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5 major hurricanes formed during the 2010 hurricane season. Since 1944, only seven seasons (1950, 1955, 1961, 1964, 1996, 2004, and 2005) have had more than five major hurricanes form.

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11 major hurricane days occurred in 2010. This is the 11th most major hurricane days to occur in a single season since 1944.

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The season accrued an ACE of 163. This is the most ACE since 2005 (250) and the 13th most since 1944.

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The season accumulated 195 NTC units. This is the most NTC since 2005 (279) and the 7th highest of the last 66 years.

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No Category 5 hurricanes developed in 2010. This is the third consecutive year with no Category 5 hurricanes. The last time that two or more years occurred in a row with no Category 5 hurricanes was 1999-2002.

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June and July had slightly above-average ACE activity. Seven ACE units were accrued during the two-month period, while the 1950-2000 June-July average was approximately 5 ACE units.

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No named storm days were accrued between August 9 and August 21. The last time that no named storm days occurred between these two dates was 2006.

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August had well above-average ACE activity. 38 ACE units were recorded during the month, which is approximately 165% of the 1950-2000 average. It was the most ACE accrued during the month of August since 2005 when 39 ACE units were accumulated.

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Eleven named storms formed between August 22 and September 29. This is the most named storms to form during this period, breaking the old record of nine named storms set in 1933, 1949, 1984 and 2002.

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September was very active. 102 NTC units were recorded during the month, which is the fourth most of all-time during September, trailing only 2004 (131 NTC), 1926 (138 NTC), and 1961 (146 NTC).

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Five hurricanes formed during the month of October. Only 1870 (six hurricanes) and 1950 (five hurricanes) have had at least five systems reach hurricane strength for the first time during October.

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Hurricane Alex became the most powerful hurricane during the month of June, in terms of maximum sustained winds (85 knots), since Hurricane Alma in 1966 which had estimated maximum sustained winds of 110 knots.

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Hurricane Igor generated 43 ACE units. This is the most ACE units generated by a single storm since Hurricane Ivan (2004) which generated a whopping 70 ACE units.

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Hurricane Julia became the farthest east that a Category 4 hurricane has formed in the MDR, according to the HURDAT database. However, it should be cautioned that the reliability of tropical cyclone statistics, especially in the eastern Atlantic is suspect prior to satellite imagery being readily available in the mid 1960s.

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Igor and Julia both were at Category 4 status on September 15. The only other time that two storms both were at Category 4 status in the Atlantic was on September 15, 1926.

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Igor, Julia and Karl were all at hurricane strength at the same time. This has only occurred in eight years prior to 2010, with the most recent occasion being in 1998.

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Four Category 4 hurricanes (Danielle, Earl, Igor and Julia) formed in the Atlantic between August 27 and September 15 (20 days). This is the shortest time span on record for four Category 4 hurricanes to develop, breaking the old record of 24 days set in 1999.

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Tomas accrued the most named storm days (8.75 NSD) of any storm forming on or after October 29 since Epsilon (2005) accrued 9.25 NSD. Tomas was also the fourth-longest lived post-October 28 tropical cyclone of the last 66 years.

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Only one tropical storm made U.S. landfall this year (Bonnie). We have not had a hurricane landfall since Hurricane Ike in 2008. The last time that we went two years in a row with no hurricane landfalls was 2000-2001.

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Only three tropical storms have made landfall over the past two years. The last time that three or fewer tropical cyclones made landfall in any consecutive two-year period was 1990-1991.

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No hurricanes made landfall along the Florida Peninsula and East Coast. This marks the fifth year in a row with no hurricane landfalls along this portion of the U.S. coastline. This is the first time since reliable U.S. records began in 1878 that no hurricanes have made landfall along the Florida Peninsula and East Coast in a five-year period.

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No hurricanes made landfall along the United States coastline this year. This is the first time in recorded history that as many as twelve hurricanes have occurred in the Atlantic basin without a United States landfall. Every other year with at least ten hurricanes in the Atlantic basin had at least two hurricane landfalls in the United States.

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No major hurricanes made U.S. landfall this year. Following seven major hurricane landfalls in 2004-2005, the U.S. has not witnessed a major hurricane landfall in the past five seasons. The five consecutive years between 1901-1905 and 1910-1914 have been the only other five consecutive year periods with no major U.S. hurricane landfalls.

http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts/2010/nov2010/nov2010.pdf

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thanks for that long list of facts-makes you realise how busy its been. Also most centres predicted it being busy. Not sure which is, so far, the nearest?

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not to sure on that John, will try and find out.

I think the last 2 facts are the most striking!

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Thanks for posting these Cookie, fascinating! What I find most interesting is the season has ended up the 3rd busiest despite being pretty late starting! The quiet period from 9th-21st August (which is usually when the season gets busier) is quite contrasting to the other facts too.

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