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The Food, Recipe And Dining Thread


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Posted
  • Location: Castle Howard, North Yorkshire
  • Location: Castle Howard, North Yorkshire

    Hi everyone :D

    I was just wondering whether any of you kind people could give me a nice 'Sweet And Sour Sauce' recipe?

    I used be quite addicted to the stuff from the Chinese takeaway, which was red and had bits of pineapple and green peppers in. Now, though, all we seem to be able to get around here is a kind of gloopy, orange jelly like substance.

    Many thanks

    Brian

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    Posted
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK
  • Weather Preferences: anything extreme or intense !
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK

    I was just wondering whether any of you kind people could give me a nice 'Sweet And Sour Sauce' recipe?

    1/4 Cup water

    2 1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar

    2 1/2 tablespoons sugar

    1 tablespoon ketchup

    1 teaspoon soy sauce

    1/8 teaspoon salt

    red pepper flakes

    2 teaspoons minced garlic

    1 teaspoon minced ginger

    1 teaspoon corn starch dissolved in 1 tablespoon cold water

    Method

    Mix together the 1/4 cup water, rice vinegar, sugar, ketchup, soy sauce, and red pepper flakes and set aside

    Heat oil, stir in the garlic and ginger and cook until soft (don't let them brown)

    Stir in the seasoning's (except for the cornstarch mixture) and bring to the boil

    Reduce heat and simmer for 1 minute, stirring to allow the flavours to blend

    Stir in the cornstarch mixture and heat until the sauce is glossy and tastes cooked through - turn off heat and cover to keep warm !

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    Posted
  • Location: Castle Howard, North Yorkshire
  • Location: Castle Howard, North Yorkshire

    Thank you for that, MKsnowangel :D Once I've sourced the ingredients, which should be today, I shall give it a try.

    Much appreciated :)

    Brian

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    Posted
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK
  • Weather Preferences: anything extreme or intense !
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK

    Thank you for that, MKsnowangel :D Once I've sourced the ingredients, which should be today, I shall give it a try.

    Much appreciated :)

    You're welcome Brian - it had been translated from Chinese so I imagine it's authentic ! I guess you can add your pineapple and green peppers at the end !

    Hope it turned out okay, Ali Posted Image

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    • 5 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Austevoll Kommune North of 60 deg N
  • Weather Preferences: Cold with a metre of lying snow
  • Location: Austevoll Kommune North of 60 deg N

    Living here in Norway I have to exist on a diet of very fresh fish, locally raised lamb and home reared pork. Also living on a small farm we get to enjoy "beestings" - that first milk produced by a cow after giving birth (after the calf has drunk its fill). We put it in a oven proof dish in a bain-marie for about 40 mins mixed with sugar and ground nutmeg. Great straight out of the oven on a cold winters night.

    What local dish do you enjoy?

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    Posted
  • Location: winscombe north somerset
  • Weather Preferences: action weather
  • Location: winscombe north somerset

    tasty meal for 2 hungry soles . cook 6 thick slices of belly of pork , grill or roast . let cool a little and then cut into cubes . cover with garlic powder or granuals , add a good portion of mushrooms , and pour over some cream .put back into a very hot oven for 10 mins ,remove and give a good mix , cook a further 10 mins or untill well rendered and crispy , serve with tinned tomatoes , and homemade scollops , even better , get a jar of baxters alberts chutney and dip the scollops in , take regular exercise ,and eat plenty of fruit and veg , all the best legritter .

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Just ordered in the essential ingredient for the Christmas season, one of the basic ingredients for a Dark and Stormy cocktail, but this gives it a 75.5% alc kick*

    Posted ImagePosted Image

    http://www.esquire.c...my-drink-recipe

    Posted Image

    *Please drink responsibly, as I do.

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    • 7 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Hot Spiced Marinade

    Liking that one QS! (I think I have most of the ingredients too!)

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    Posted
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire

    Hot Spiced Marinade

    Do pretty much the same thing, but swap out the white wine vinegar for balsamic.

    And as it's the last day of summer today, we've got some pork belly in the fridge crying out for it this eve.

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    • 5 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Peasedown St John.N.E.Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Fair to Foul...
  • Location: Peasedown St John.N.E.Somerset

    Goes well with prunes and custard......

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    Posted
  • Location: The Sexy South
  • Weather Preferences: Fresh n Funky
  • Location: The Sexy South

    Goes well with prunes and custard......

    Prunes are a delicious accompaniment to any gamier meats like Venison and Horse.

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    • 4 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Made this for Xmas last night, I may have upped certain of the ingredients...... Posted Image

    http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/type-of-dish/party-food/accompaniment/cumberland-rum-butter.html

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    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire

    Any recommendations for favoured Moroccan style dishes out there?

    I used my new tagine for the first time last night and went with Chicken thighs, dried apricots, green olives, roasted pistachios, ginger and chili, etc. It was fantastic. Just polished off the rest for lunch.

    Any other tried and tested suggestions for similar dishes would be most welcome.

    John

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Any recommendations for favoured Moroccan style dishes out there?

    Got to be lamb really eh? But how about with pomegranate?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/moroccanspicedlambst_92430

    Not sure it uses your tagine effectively though.

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    Posted
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire

    Got to be lamb really eh? But how about with pomegranate?

    Cheers Coast. Yes, I'd got the lamb in for that very reason, but it had to be used on New Years Day. Having got in at 4, I wasn't really in the mood for experimenting, so the lamb went in a Jalfrezi instead. Posted Image

    Pomegranate and honey though... Good one.

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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    How about this twist on a chicken recipe using duck?

    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/4847/duck-tagine-with-clementines

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    • 4 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire

    Might just have made a significant leap forward in Yorkshire pudding technology...

    Saved the previous 6 pint milk container, into which the required amount of milk and water was decanted.

    The size of the container and a full-on lengthy shake put in masses of bubbles, more than I could ever whisk in. Poured out the now frothy liquid and mixed in the egg, flour and seasoning and added the batter to the hot oil.

    Must have got a good 2 1/2 inches on those bad boys. Almost worth a photo, but that would have meant sinking to a new low.

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    Posted
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire

    Oh I don't know, i've probably seen worse on here. I say go for it. We need evidence Posted Image

    Yes Chef.

    Posted Image

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    Posted
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire
  • Location: Downton, Wiltshire

    Oh I don't know, i've probably seen worse on here. I say go for it. We need evidence Posted Image

    There you go QS. A new low. What's more, the camera didn't even focus.

    post-7340-0-73807300-1360095709_thumb.jp

    To paraphrase an old Irish priest - those knives are not very far away.

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    • 1 month later...
    Posted
  • Location: N.Bedfordshire, E.Northamptonshire
  • Weather Preferences: Cool not cold, warm not hot. No strong Wind.
  • Location: N.Bedfordshire, E.Northamptonshire

    Have a slow cooker that gets hammered by me making "ready" meals, fresh stuff in them, no cr4p, I know what is in them, then put into tubs to freeze/store to use as and when I need them.

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    • 2 months later...
    Posted
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
  • Location: Leeds/Bradford border, 185 metres above sea level, around 600 feet
    • 1 month later...
    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

     

    Perfect cheese on toast: If b=bread, c=cheese and t=time, what is the point of all these formulae?
     
    Yet another dubious equation – describing a recipe for a beloved late-night snack – has left some mathematicians unimpressed
    The scientists at the Royal Society of Chemistry have come up with many complex mathematical formulae in their time, but perhaps never one this silly: today they unveil their sums for calculating how to make the perfect cheese on toast.
     
    It comes only days after an equation was published to predict the murder rate in Brazil as its population increases – rarely can there have been two formulae so far apart in the seriousness of their subject matter. Yet whether they are of vital importance to humanity or designed simply for some silly season fun, it seems a new mathematical formula appears every other day. Mathematicians create formulae that can have a huge impact on society – with the Brazilian model constructed by a team from State University of Maringa a perfect example.
     
    In a country with some of the most violent cities in the world, anticipating crime is a potentially lifesaving exercise and can be applied to other issues including literacy. Such calculations, though, do not always have a positive on the world. The Black-Scholes formula, created by US economists Fisher Black and Myron Scholes, is widely blamed for the recent global financial crash. It gives traders a theoretical estimate of “options†– financial contracts that give the buyer the right, but not an obligation, to buy or sell an asset at an agreed price on or before a specified date. However, within a short time of the formula being applied to real-world finance, banks and hedge funds became reliant on the equations and traditional traders were knocked out. The financial system became susceptible to over-simplification of the maths and mistakes. The rest, as the world’s still-stuttering economy shows, is history.
     
    So, where does grilled cheese fit with the formulae big guns? In the words of the British Cheese Board, which worked alongside the chemists, it wanted to “undertake a series of rigorous tests†to determine the formula. After “careful consideration of optimum grilling conditions†and the width and breadth of the cheese and bread, they came up with the following: 150g of hard cheese on white bread, grilled for four minutes at 115C, 18cm from the grill. A few simple substitutions justified the formula designation: for example, ‘a medium slice of white bread’ was expressed as ‘(10mm* x wB)’.
     
    These kind of marketing exercises, using maths as advertising tools, do not amuse all mathematicians. Nick Ovenden, a mathematics lecturer at University College London, was once asked by a PR company to create the formula for the perfect tennis serve. He told The Independent that he will never respond to such a request again. “There are often articles with ridiculous equations that do a big disservice to the subject,†he said. “These equations provide no useful value. Worse still, they distort perceptions of what proper mathematical research is about and do not inform on what amazing contributions mathematics can make to society.â€
     
    Maths should have a high profile in the media, Dr Ovenden said. But the public are distracted from amazing equations used, for example, by search engines or to design heart valves. He described how his tennis equation appeared in the media but “not one newspaper published a single equation probably because it wasn’t in the form A+B-C=Dâ€. “You get the sense that if I had spent five minutes and come up with something completely nonsensical, like ‘Murray’s wearing his favourite shirt + the roar of the crowd – the number of break points not converted = how good the serve is’, that might have actually been shown in an article. As a result I cannot ever see myself responding to such a request again.â€
     
    Other mathematicians disagree. Jeremy Hodgson, professor of mathematics education at Kings College London, believes the cheese on toast formula shouldn’t be mocked. “A recipe is a formula,†he said. “Heston Blumenthal will take a very scientific approach and will have very precise notions of what to use. “Cheese on toast is a bit of fun. It is expressing a formula in funny, simple terms but it is expressing something real. We do express recipes in terms of formula, just without xs, ys and bs. Having ways to have fun with maths is quite important too.â€

     

     

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