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Posted
  • Location: Warwick and Hull
  • Location: Warwick and Hull

    A large number of small earthquakes <M2 are showing up on the IMO's website. It's located in a geothermal area on the Reykjanes peninsula, but there's no well known volcano from what i can tell in the area. It's also located near a large lake that was partially drained during the 2000 Earthquake.

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    I was expecting a bigger eruption but not that soon! Spectacular eruption happened just an hour ago! You can see the shockwaves and lava bombs on the side of the volcano!     Karyo

    I don't think it is.  It is part of the Commonwealth though. Most of my family live in St Vincent.  Been talking to them a lot over the last couple of days as some of them had to move from the no

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    Posted
  • Location: Macclesfield, Cheshire
  • Location: Macclesfield, Cheshire

    It appears to be in the peninsula above Reykjanes - no seismic activity around there to speak of.... how odd!

    Posted Image

    Picture below taken from http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/subsets/?subset=Iceland.2010314.aqua.721.250m&vectors=fires+coast+borders

    Does this show a plume???

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    Edited by loobiloo
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    Posted
  • Location: Warwick and Hull
  • Location: Warwick and Hull

    There are some lakes in the area, but the second image with the plume seems to show what looks like it could be a lava lake. Along with that, it's highly unusual to have an eruption with no accompanying seismic activity, and there are no volcanoes in that particular area of lowland.

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    Posted
  • Location: Breasclete, Isle of Lewis
  • Weather Preferences: Loving the vaiety
  • Location: Breasclete, Isle of Lewis

    Yellowstone has seen a spike in recent months in swarm earthquakes however this is completely normal and indeed the current level of swarms is way below previous peaks, june 1999 for example saw over 610 earthquakes in a one week period. so i wouldnt be too worried there. Interesting imagery from iceland, no hint of an eruption in the west of the country and i think satelite imagery may, as others have said be picking up a lava lake although its odd to have no seismic activity.

    Reykjanes ridge on the other hand seems to be the main focus for activity with a series of deep quakes.

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield

    First of all Merapi is still unstable although quieter than before. A video here from someone 300 meters from summit which isn't really sensible. http://www.metrotvnews.com/read/newsvideo/2010/11/17/117071/Video-Amatir-Merapi-dari-Jarak-300-MeterAmateurvideo

    And a great shot of the damage around the volcano http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=46975 anyone for a game of golf. Do you get a free shot if your golf ball gets frazzled ???

    On a more serious note death toll is a 227.

    Source as ever http://bigthink.com/blogs/eruptions/

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield

    Okay doke what's rumbling today.

    Chaiten has been more active lately but recent reports seem to indicate a slight drop again. You'll need to translate the page http://www.sernageomin.cl/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=572&Itemid=1

    Etna has been twitching a bit as well with some ash eruptions from the North east crater. http://www.ct.ingv.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=287

    It also sounds like the Soufrière Hills might gone back soon as the dome is getting more unstable. Again this depends how much material breaks away.

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    Posted
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex

    Interesting article by iceland's Jon Frimanns Iceland Volcano and earthquake blog. http://www.jonfr.com/volcano/

    Small streams around Hekla volcano dry up

    Posted on November 29, 2010 by Jón Frímann According to Icelandic news there is little water in small streams that come from Hekla volcano. This lack of water in streams from Hekla volcano is often looked as indicators that a eruption is going to happen in coming months. This phenomenon has happened before a eruption took place in Hekla volcano, the last one that took place in the year 2000. But according to old news article (in Icelandic, pdf) (from the year 1995) this phenomenon was also observed before the big eruption in the year 1755. But I do not know if this happens always (it seems to do so. But I don’t have it confirmed) or just before some eruptions.

    There has been drought in the area. But that might explain in part this lack of water in streams coming from Hekla volcano. But the rest of this lack of water might be related to changes in the area before Hekla volcano starts erupting. Far as I know there has not been any study into this phenomenon and why this happens to Hekla streams months before eruption takes place.

    Hekla volcano does not give many long term signals on when it might start erupting. But far as this one goes, this might be the best signals we can get on the impending eruption in Hekla volcano. When the eruption might take place is impossible to know at current time.

    Icelandic News.

    Vatn er lítið í ám og lækjum nærri Heklu (Vísir.is, Icelandic)

    Posted in Hekla, Volcano | 23 Comments

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield

    Now one Volcano that doesn't want to go to sleep is Tungurahua in Ecuador. This volcano has been erupting on and off since 1999 and at one time did seem to be quietening down. However it's rest now seems to be over as the strengh of the eruptions increase. These eruptions have also produced small Pryroclastic flows. The volcano has produced larger pryoclastic flows in it's previous history which is probably why the Government is evacuating people once again.

    Source as ever http://bigthink.com/blogs/eruptions/

    Erta'Ale in Ethiopia is also erupting producing small lava flows from it's lava lake.

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    Posted
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex

    And yet more earthquake swarms in Iceland.

    Current ongoing earthquake swarms in Iceland

    Posted on December 5, 2010 by Jón Frímann At current time there are two main earthquake swarms taking place in Iceland. The first one is at Krísuvík volcano and has been going on since early this week. Currently there is nothing to suggest that it going to end any time soon. This earthquake swarm however sometimes stops for several hours and up to one to two days at the longest. Most of the earthquakes taking place are less then mag 2.5 in size. It is not clear why this earthquakes are taking place. This might be tectonic process or something to do with the magma intrusion that is taking place in Krísuvík volcano.

    The second earthquake swarm is taking place at Herðubreiðartögl with earthquake taking place at Herðubreið at it’s north limits. Several mag 3.0+ earthquakes have taken place. This earthquakes appears to be due to tectonic process in the area. But I have heard theories that this process might have started due to influx of magma into the Askja volcano that is close to earthquake swarms in Herðubreiðartögl. At current time I cannot confirm that this ideas are correct or not. This earthquake swarm is ongoing and does not appear to be ending. But there are breaks in it that last from few hours and up to one day at the longest. Please note that Herðubreiðarfjöll is a central volcano that is active. It is not on the GVP volcano list for the area. This volcano is located inside Askja fissure swarm and has many active fault lines that cross it from north-south.

    The newest earthquake swarm that appears to be at slow start is taking place in Esjufjöll volcano. But since activity started there in early October 2010 earthquakes appears to be on the rise in Esjufjöll volcano. It is worth noticing that earthquake swarms in Esjufjöll appear to start slowly but they due appear to peak after 20 to 180 hours after they starts. This earthquake activity is due to new flow of magma into Esjufjöll volcano.

    Posted in Earthquakes, Esjufjöll, Krísuvík | 8 Comments

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield

    Been sleeping a little on this one.

    Unconfirmed explosions at Eyjafjallajökull while Etna has been confirmed as active. Nice page here to read up http://www.ct.ingv.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=293

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    Posted
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex

    Two earthquakes in Grímsfjall volcano

    Posted on January 13, 2011 by Jón Frímann Earlier this morning there where two earthquakes in Grímsfjall volcano. There size was ML3.5 at 09:06 UTC and ML4.2 at 09:22 UTC. I am currently unsure about the depth of this earthquakes. This earthquakes take place in a area north-east in the Grímsfjall volcano system. But according to news this area has been seeing a increased earthquake activity in recent weeks.

    No aftershocks have been detected since this earthquakes took place. But currently the weather is rather bad in this area, so that might be the explanation for the absence of earthquakes that should have followed this two earthquakes. According to the news the Icelandic Met Office is monitoring the area for more earthquakes or signs that a eruption might be starting. So far nothing indicates that a eruption is about to start in Grímsfjall volcano.

    Icelandic News about this. Use Google Translate at own risk.

    2 jarðskjálftar við Grímsvötn (Rúv.is)

    Snarpur jarðskjálfti við Grímsfjall (Vísir.is)

    Fylgjast náið með Grímsfjalli (mbl.is)

    Jarðskjálfti við Grímsfjall (mbl.is)

    Source:- http://www.jonfr.com/volcano/

    Update Jón Frímann says: January 13, 2011 at 16:19 According to Icelandic news this might be the largest earthquake since the year 1934, when a magnitude 4.5 earthquake did happen in Grímsfjall volcano. That earthquake did start a eruption in Grímsfjall volcano.

    So far everything remains quiet in Grímsfjall volcano.

    By the way, just in case nobody noticed, Etna is putting on a wonderful show at the moment too.

    Edited by coldfingers
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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield

    Etna has decided to welcome the new year in with another eruption. Fantastic pictures and film here http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1346685/Red-sky-night--Sicily-looks-Mount-Etna-erupts-spectacular-fashion.html

    More info here as ever http://bigthink.com/blogs/eruptions/

    Also Krakatua has been busy with discussions of evacuations in case it gets really nasty. Scroll down on the above link.

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    Posted
  • Location: Lochgelly - Highest town in Fife at 150m ASL.
  • Weather Preferences: Snow and cold. Enjoy all extremes though.
  • Location: Lochgelly - Highest town in Fife at 150m ASL.

    More unrest around as well it seems:

    http://www.volcanolive.com/news.html

    (Sorry!) kind of overlaps the above link.

    Edited by Blitzen
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    Posted
  • Location: Aldborough, North Norfolk
  • Location: Aldborough, North Norfolk

    More unrest around as well it seems:

    http://www.volcanolive.com/news.html

    (Sorry!) kind of overlaps the above link.

    Do we have any real correlation on increased activity when the sun is quiet? I've heard and read supposition, but nothing firm

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    Posted
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield
  • Weather Preferences: Any Extreme
  • Location: Sheffield South Yorkshire 160M Powering the Sheffield Shield

    latest Etna report in English http://www.ct.ingv.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=309 good video here

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    Posted
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
  • Weather Preferences: Hot sunny , cold and snowy, thunderstorms
  • Location: Weston-S-Mare North Somerset
    Posted
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex

    Interesting article in the Daily Mail today.

    http://www.dailymail...-thirds-US.html

    Oh dear, just in time for 2012. *sigh* :rofl:

    No wonder they call it the Daily Fail. It is begining to make the Sun seem like a serious paper not the mens comic it really is.

    Now a bit of sense from someone who knows more than I do.

    From http://bigthink.com/blogs/eruptions/

    Yellowstone: The public and media obsession with the caldera

    Erik Klemetti on January 25, 2011, 12:13 PM Posted Image Sometimes I think that people have an unhealthy obsession with Yellowstone Caldera. Sure, it is big, powerful and the stuff that disaster movies are made, but in terms of a volcanic system that poses a high threat to life/property in the U.S. on a daily basis, it is relatively low. I know what you are thinking (well, some of you): "How can you say that? Look at how big the past eruptions were?" Yes, indeed, the previous eruption from the modern Yellowstone Caldera were indeed big, some of the biggest we have identified on the continents (it is still no Fish Canyon Tuff), so I'll give you that. However, looking at the recent volcanic history of Yellowstone, you'd see that these big "doomsday" eruptions are only a very small piece of its activity, so even if tomorrow the caldera began to show signs of imminent eruption, there is a very good chance that it would be a relatively minor eruption - possibly on the scale of the 2008 and onward Chaiten eruption in Chile.

    So, why is it that when a fairly innocuous paper comes out, everyone gets all riled up? National Geographic had a piece about a December 2010 article in Geophysical Research Letters by Chang and others called "An extraordinary episode of Yellowstone caldera uplift, 2004-2010, from GPS and InSAR observations". Alright, I can see why it might catch a reporter's attention: "extraordinary episode" combined with "caldera uplift" all in the recent past (2004-2010) seems juicy. Well, dissecting the article it seems that the key findings are (a) a large area of the Yellowstone caldera has been rising since 2004 (http://nwstatic.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/cool.gif from 2004-06, the surface was rising 7-5 cm/yr; from 2006-08, rising 4-2 cm/yr and from 2008-2010, rising 2-0.5 cm/yr and © the source of this uplift was likely a sill intruding at 7-10 km depth (see figure below). The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory press release about the paper is pretty subdued, which isn't surprising considering that if research like this makes it to publication, then the data in it is "old news" to the scientific community. Whenever you read about a "shocking" new research paper, remember, that data is likely a year or more old and has been vetted by many people in the research community - not exactly breaking events.

    Posted Image

    Now, should we expect this at an active caldera? Yes! Does this mean that the caldera is going to erupt soon? Maybe! Will it destroy us all? Probably not!

    However, much like much news on the internet, information gets run through a massive game of telephone. This news about Yellowstone morphed into more 2012-style doomsday news. Some fine examples:

    Tuscon Citizen: Fairly reasonable look at Yellowstone Caldera until you get to the bottom, where the National Park Service assessment of the activity at Yellowstone as being fairly low with no signs of a "catastrophic eruption is imminent" is juxtaposed with the findings in the Chang et al. paper. This is exactly what you shouldn't do as there is no indication in the paper that its findings are in conflict with the idea that a catastrophic is not around the corner.

    Daily Mail: The headline alone takes it to another level: "Is the world's largest super-volcano about to erupt for the first time in 600,000 years, wiping out two-thirds of the U.S.?" I can't remember who said this, but if the title of your article can be answered with "no", then maybe you need to rethink the title, or the article in general. Sadly, it gets worse as the potential eruption at Yellowstone is described as "spewing lava far into the sky" and the U.S. will become uninhabitable by "toxic air", then goes on to say that a new "supereruption" could be coming in the "near future". There is much less information about Yellowstone in the article and very little from the original GRL article - heck, it isn't even mentioned. I'm not even sure what the "scorched earth" image is halfway through the article. And other media websites that have picked up this piece have morphed the title to "Largest volcano 'to erupt after 600,000 years, wipe out 2/3 of U.S." Ugh. (This spoof does a good job describing the Daily Mail's coverage)

    San Francisco Chronicle (picked up from Benzinga): Now, we get completely wrong headlines from Jonathan Chen of Benzinga.com: "Could the world's oldest volcano wipe out more than 50% of the US?" Where do I start? Yellowstone is clearly not the "world's oldest volcano". Not even close. Could it wipe out 50% of the US? Maybe it could, likely it wouldn't (see my note for the Daily Mail). Here, the study is cut down to two quotes with very little info beyond the absolutely terrible and wrong headline.

    Gawker: At least Gawker was having a little fun with Yellowstone, right down to the hashtag #volcanofail. Even their brief synopsis of what will happen during a catastrophic eruption isn't too bad, at least saying that the caldera will erupt ash to 25 km rather than lava. The best line, though, sums up the Yellowstone hysteria nicely: "But who do you trust, some kind of "professor," or your overactive imagination?"

    There you go. Yellowstone is pretty calm as giant caldera systems go. We have such a small record of the behavior of a "restless caldera" that this inflation at Yellowstone could very easily fall into the realm of normal, non-eruption-causing behavior. And if you ever worry, Yellowstone is also well-wired to see all the real time data, including earthquakes in the region and in the park, temperatures of hot springs, webcams, deformation within the caldera and hydrologic changes in the area. You would expect that if Yellowstone were headed towards an eruption, we would see lots of rapid inflation, lots of constant seismicity that gets shallower through time, a change in the temperature/composition of the hydrothermal systems and possibly even cracks forming in the land around the caldera. In other words, there will be lots of signs. So, the next time you see a doomdays article about Yellowstone, remember, calderas are busy places and the media loves its disasters.

    Top left: Grand Prismatic Spring at Yellowstone Caldera

    Edited by coldfingers
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    Posted
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK
  • Weather Preferences: anything extreme or intense !
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK

    A Japanese volcano featured in the James Bond film You Only Live Twice has erupted covering surrounding villages with ash.

    The Mount Shinomoedake volcano, in southern Japan erupted into life on Wednesday throwing ash almost 5,000ft into the air.

    Roads have become unpassable and trains and flights to the area have been cancelled as officials assess the situation.

    No injuries have been reported but a 1.2 mile safety exclusion zone has been created around the site.

    The volcano has been active before, erupting in 1959, 1979 and most recently in 2008.

    The volcano and surrounding area in southern Japan was used as the centrepiece for You Only Live Twice starring Sean Connery.

    http://www.examiner.com/natural-disasters-in-national/nighttime-eruption-of-japan-s-mount-shinmoe-captured-on-video-video

    Edited by MKsnowangel
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    Posted
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex
  • Location: Bognor Regis West Sussex

    A Japanese volcano featured in the James Bond film You Only Live Twice has erupted covering surrounding villages with ash.

    The Mount Shinomoedake volcano, in southern Japan erupted into life on Wednesday throwing ash almost 5,000ft into the air.

    Roads have become unpassable and trains and flights to the area have been cancelled as officials assess the situation.

    No injuries have been reported but a 1.2 mile safety exclusion zone has been created around the site.

    The volcano has been active before, erupting in 1959, 1979 and most recently in 2008.

    The volcano and surrounding area in southern Japan was used as the centrepiece for You Only Live Twice starring Sean Connery.

    http-~~-//www.examiner.com/natural-disasters-in-national/nighttime-eruption-of-japan-s-mount-shinmoe-captured-on-video-video

    Is it this one? http://webcam-svo2.p...cal/camera.html

    If it is then it is certainly putting on an impressive show. Well worth watching, particularly during their night time when you will see a fantastic fireworks show.

    You may have to wait a while for it to load.

    Edited by coldfingers
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    Posted
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK
  • Weather Preferences: anything extreme or intense !
  • Location: Milton Keynes MK

    Volcanic lightning as Shinmoe continues to erupt..

    http-~~-//www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2hlT_TyP3o

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    • 2 weeks later...
    • 3 weeks later...
    Posted
  • Location: Breasclete, Isle of Lewis
  • Weather Preferences: Loving the vaiety
  • Location: Breasclete, Isle of Lewis

    A great deal of activity in Iceland again at the moment.

    With over 400 earthquakes under the Krisuvik volcano there certainly seems to be something a foot!

    Activity here has been high over the last week but the last 24 hours has seen things really step up a notch.

    one of the best sources for info is a local blogger at http://www.jonfr.com/volcano/

    Suggests that an eruptive phase may well be under way as this is symptomatic of magma pressure building below the crust, if an eruption does occur then its likely to be similar to Kilauea in Hawaii.

    http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes/reykjanesridge/

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    Posted
  • Location: hertfordshire
  • Location: hertfordshire

    A great deal of activity in Iceland again at the moment.

    With over 400 earthquakes under the Krisuvik volcano there certainly seems to be something a foot!

    Activity here has been high over the last week but the last 24 hours has seen things really step up a notch.

    one of the best sources for info is a local blogger at http://www.jonfr.com/volcano/

    Suggests that an eruptive phase may well be under way as this is symptomatic of magma pressure building below the crust, if an eruption does occur then its likely to be similar to Kilauea in Hawaii.

    http://en.vedur.is/e...reykjanesridge/

    Very interesting I have been watching this myself and I see there has

    recently been another 4+ earthquake.

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