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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

Seismicity remains low and ground deformation is negligible at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Earthquakes, probably aftershocks of the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May, continue on South Flank faults.

On the volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), the crew on this morning's overflight confirmed that weakly active lava continues to fill the deep crater in the fissure 8 cone with no lava extending outside the walls of the cone and no flows heading down the spillway. Other vents were steaming due to morning rains.

Sulfur dioxide emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate (< 1,000 t/d) is lower than at any time since late 2007. On Friday (08/31), LERZ emission rates were still too low to measure.

HVO crews continue to restore communication with several monitoring stations on the east side of the island that was disrupted by the passage of Hurricane/Tropical Storm Lane but the losses do not significantly reduce our ability to assess volcanic conditions. Whiteout conditions could occur on the new lava field due due to steam produced by heavy rainfall on still-hot lava flows.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ as best we can. Ground and drone crews are in the field today but continue to be hampered by weather conditions.

HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed. The next update will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

Seismicity remains low and ground deformation is negligible at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Earthquakes, probably aftershocks of the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May, continue on South Flank faults.

On the volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), the UAS crew confirmed that weak lava activity was present in the fissure 8 cone this morning with no lava extending outside the walls of the cone and no flows heading down the spillway.

Sulfur dioxide emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate (< 1,000 t/d) is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rate measurements from LERZ vents were slightly higher than those measured in the past week but still low.

HVO crews were successful in restoring communication to most of the monitoring stations on the east side of the island where data communications were disrupted by the passage of Hurricane/Tropical Storm Lane.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ as best we can. Ground and drone crews are in the field today but continue to be hampered by weather conditions.

HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed. The next update will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

 


VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

The aviation color code and alert level for Veniaminof Volcano were raised to ORANGE/WATCH earlier today. Seismic activity remains elevated at Veniaminof. Low-level ash emissions have been observed in web camera images from this morning and confirmed by observers in Perryville.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. No significant activity was observed over the past day in seismic data or in mostly cloudy satellite images.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. Moderately elevated surface temperatures were observed in satellite images acquired over the past day. Webcam views of the volcano were mostly obscured by clouds. No significant activity was detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data over the past day.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

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Doh another update

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

Seismicity remains low and ground deformation is negligible at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. A magnitude-3.1 earthquake that occurred at 5:31AM HST this morning was located below Kīlauea's South Flank and is likely an aftershock of the magnitude-6.9 earthquake from early May.

On the volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), no incandescence was visible on the fissure 8 spillway overnight. Images from the UAS (drone) crew showed that weak lava activity continues in the fissure 8 cone as of yesterday afternoon, with no lava extending outside the walls of the cone and no flows heading down the spillway.

Sulfur dioxide emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate (< 1,000 t/d) is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rate measurements from LERZ vents were slightly higher than those measured in the past week but still low.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed. The next update will be issued tomorrow morning unless significant changes occur.

Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

 

VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Veniaminof. Seismic activity remains elevated. The FAA Perryville web camera showed frequent pulsatory low altitude ash plumes throughout the day yesterday and continuing this morning. A pilot report from this morning indicated a volcanic cloud from Veniaminof at an altitude less than10,000 ft asl and a small amount of ash deposited on the ice field. Small thermal features consistent with a hot vent area were observed in satellite data from the past day.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. No significant activity was observed over the past day in seismic data or in partly cloudy satellite images.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. Weakly elevated surface temperatures were observed in one high resolution satellite image acquired over the past day. Partial views of the volcano in the webcam show no activity. No significant activity was detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data over the past day.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), small amounts of incandescence were visible within the fissure 8 cone overnight. However there were no changes to the glowing area, which suggests stationary sources. Small lava flows have been observed within the fissure 8 cone, however none extend outside the walls of the cone. There is no change in overall activity from observations over the past several days.

Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Small aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May continue to occur on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank.

Tiltmeters in Kīlauea's middle East Rift Zone are recording small amounts of inflationary tilt, which may be a sign of refilling of the rift zone. The current rates are much smaller than those measured during the period of major eruptive activity and have been steady over the past week.

Sulfur dioxide emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rate measurements from LERZ vents measured on September 5th were below 20 tonnes/day, close to the detection threshold of the measurement technique.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

 

VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Veniaminof. Seismic activity remains elevated. Incandescence was observed at the summit of Veniaminof in images from the FAA Perryville web camera beginning at 02:46 AKST and continuing until dawn. Early morning images from the webcam showed minor ash or steam emissions in the immediate vicinity of the summit cone. Strongly elevated surface temperatures were observed at the summit in satellite data from last night and visible light imagery showed an ash deposit on the Veniaminof snowfield in a SSW to SE shaped V from the summit.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. No significant activity was observed over the past day in seismic data or in cloudy satellite images.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. Elevated surface temperatures were observed in satellite data acquired this morning. Clear webcam views form this morning showed no activity. No significant activity was detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data during the past day.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

 

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), minor amounts of incandescence and fume continue to be visible within the fissure 8 cone. Small lava flows have been observed within the fissure 8 cone, however none have extended outside the walls of the cone. There is no change in overall activity from observations over the past several days.

Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. Small aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May continue to occur on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank.

Yesterday, Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater experienced a series of small collapses. These produced episodes of visible brown plume throughout the day (the most prominent at about 10:30AM HST) and generated small tilt offsets and seismic energy recorded by nearby geophysical instruments. The collapses had no discernable effect on other parts of the rift, though we will continue to monitor for longer-term changes.

Tiltmeters in Kīlauea's middle East Rift Zone continue to record small amounts of inflationary tilt, which may be a sign of refilling of the rift zone. The rates have been steady over the past week and did not show a short-term change following yesterday’s collapses at Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below 20 tonnes/day when measured on September 5th, close to the detection threshold of the measurement technique.

 

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Alaskan volcanos

VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Veniaminof. Seismic activity remains elevated. Incandescence was observed at the summit of Veniaminof in images from the FAA Perryville web camera throughout last night. Strongly elevated surface temperatures were observed at the summit in satellite data.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. There has been a slight increase in local earthquakes over the past day. No significant activity was observed in cloudy satellite images.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. Elevated surface temperatures were observed in several satellite images acquired over the past day. Clear webcam views form this morning showed active degassing from the summit. No significant activity was detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data during the past day.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), a small collapse pit formed within the fissure 8 cone over the past day, exposing hot material underneath and producing an increase in incandescence. No surface flow was associated with this event. Small lava flows have been observed within the fissure 8 cone, however none have extended outside the walls of the cone.

Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. Aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank.

Small collapses continue to occur at Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater, producing visible brown plumes. The rate of inflationary tilt recorded by a nearby tiltmeter has slowly decreased over the past day and another tiltmeter in the East Rift Zone is also showing a slight decrease in inflationary tilt. However, there is no change in seismicity rate at this time. We will continue to watch these data for changes.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below 20 tonnes/day when measured on September 5th, close to the detection threshold of the measurement technique.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.


 

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), minor amounts of incandescence were observed overnight from a collapse pit within the fissure 8 cone, though the amount was reduced over observations from the previous night. Very minor fuming is visible from a small spatter cone located towards the back of the cone. Small lava flows have been observed within the fissure 8 cone, however none have extended outside the walls of the cone.

Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. Aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank.

Small collapses continued to occur yesterday at Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater, but are much less frequent than they were over the previous two days. A nearby tiltmeter began recording deflationary tilt, and another tiltmeter further downrift has continued to show a decrease in its rate of inflationary tilt. Rates of tilting throughout the East Rift Zone are much lower than were observed during the period of major eruptive activity. There has been no change in seismicity during this time. We will continue to watch these data for changes.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below 20 tonnes/day when measured on September 5th, close to the detection threshold of the measurement technique.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

 

VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Veniaminof volcano continues to erupt, feeding a lava flow confined to the ice-filled summit caldera. No significant ash emissions were observed. Elevated seismic activity, nighttime incandescence in webcam images, and elevated surface temperatures in thermal satellite data continue to be recorded.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. Earthquake activity remains elevated. No significant activity was observed in satellite images.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. Elevated surface temperatures were observed in satellite images acquired over the past day. No significant activity was detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

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VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Eruption of a lava flow from Veniaminof volcano's summit cone likely continues, as suggested by continued observations of elevated seismic activity, nighttime incandescence in webcam images, and elevated surface temperatures in thermal satellite data. No significant ash emissions were observed.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. Earthquake activity remains elevated. No significant activity was observed in partly cloudy satellite images.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. No significant activity was observed in cloudy satellite images or detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

 

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), the collapse pit within the fissure 8 cone was no longer incandescent last night but a glowing spot just west of the pit that first appeared on Sept. 11th got wider last night and may be a very small, slow lava flow moving along the west edge of the collapse pit. Since the beginning of September, small lava flows have been observed within the fissure 8 cone, however none have extended outside the walls of the cone.

Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. Aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank. For the last few days, summit tilt seemed to be turning to weak inflation. This morning there is the suggestion that summit tilt may have returned to deflationary motion, however tiltmeters throughout the volcano are affected by rainfall. We will continue monitoring this trend to see if it continues.

Small collapses within Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater have occurred during the past week. Rates of tilting throughout the East Rift Zone are much lower than were observed during the period of major eruptive activity. There has been no change in seismicity during the past week. We will continue to watch these data for changes.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents Tuesday (09/11) were below the detection threshold of the measurement technique.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

 

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VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Eruption of a lava flow from Veniaminof volcano's summit cone likely continues, as suggested by continued observations of elevated seismic activity, nighttime incandescence in webcam images, and elevated surface temperatures in thermal satellite data. No significant ash emissions were observed.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. Earthquake activity remains elevated. No significant activity was observed in partly cloudy satellite images.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. No significant activity was observed in cloudy satellite images or detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), the collapse pit is the central part of a slowly subsiding lava surface that previously filled the fissure 8 cone. Mininimal incandescence, less than yesterday, is still visible overnight while minor fuming is visible during the day.

Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. A magnitude-2.9 long-period earthquake, similar to those that accompanied collapses prior to Aug. 4th, occurred yesterday at about 2 pm below the collapse and was felt in nearby locations; however, there was no indication of actual collapse at the summit. Aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank. For the last few days, summit tilt seemed to be turning to weak inflation but weak deflation resumed on Sept. 12.

Small collapses continue to occur within Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater generating dust plumes. Rates of tilting throughout the East Rift Zone are much lower than those observed during the period of major eruptive activity. There has been no change in seismicity during the past week.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below the detection threshold of the measurement technique when last measured on Sept. 11.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

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all quiet on the Hawaiian front

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), the collapse pit is the central part of a slowly subsiding lava surface that previously filled the fissure 8 cone. No incandescence is visible overnight while minor fuming is visible during the day.

Seismicity and ground deformation remains low at the summit of Kīlauea. Aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank.

No collapses within Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater have been observed over the past few days. Rates of tilting throughout the East Rift Zone are much lower than those observed during the period of major eruptive activity. There has been no change in seismicity during the past week.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below the detection threshold of the measurement technique when last measured on Sept. 11. Minor amounts of H2S are being emitted at the summit and at Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.


 

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Not so quiet at AVO

SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Semisopochnoi volcano. The onset of continuous seismicity yesterday prompted AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to YELLOW/ADVISORY. Retrospective analysis of satellite data from September 10 shows evidence of a small ash deposit on the flanks of the north cone of Mount Cerberus, which may have resulted from two minor seismic tremor bursts recorded on September 8. This satellite imagery, combined with a further increase in seismic tremor amplitudes today, prompted AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to ORANGE/WATCH. While the recent ash deposit suggests the potential for ash emissions coincident with elevated seismicity, there have been no ash emissions observed in cloudy satellite images around the time of today's tremor increase. Furthermore, there has been no eruptive activity recorded on regional pressure sensors in Adak, although current atmospheric conditions limit signal propagation between Semisopochnoi and Adak.

Semisopochnoi is monitored with an on-island seismic network, and remotely by satellite and lightning sensors. An infrasound array on Adak Island may detect explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi with a 13 minute delay if atmospheric conditions permit.



VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Eruption of a lava flow from Veniaminof volcano's summit cone likely continues, as suggested by continued observations of elevated seismic activity, nighttime incandescence in webcam images, and elevated surface temperatures in thermal satellite data. No significant ash emissions have been observed.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. Earthquake activity remains elevated. No significant activity was observed in partly cloudy satellite images over the past day.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland Volcano. Elevated surface temperatures were observed in satellite images over the past day. However, no significant activity has been detected in seismic or pressure sensor (infrasound) data.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.

 

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), no incandescence was visible overnight in the collapse pit within the fissure 8 cone. Minor fuming is visible during the day. Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. Small aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's South Flank.

No collapses within Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater have been observed over the past few days. Rates of tilting throughout the East Rift Zone are much lower than those observed during the period of major eruptive activity. There has been no change in seismicity during the past week.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below the detection threshold of the measurement technique when last measured on Sept. 11. Minor amounts of H2S are being emitted at the summit and at Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.


 

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and lower East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (LERZ), no incandescence was visible overnight in the collapse pit within the fissure 8 cone. Minor fuming is visible during the day. Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. A magnitude 3.5 earthquake occurred at 1:56am local time on Kīlauea's South Flank. Other small aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated on faults located in this area.

No collapses within Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater have been observed over the past week. Rates of tilting throughout the East Rift Zone are much lower than those observed during the period of major eruptive activity. There has been no change in seismicity during the past week.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and LERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from LERZ vents were below the detection threshold of the measurement technique when last measured on Sept. 11. Minor amounts of H2S are being emitted at the summit and at Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and LERZ. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

 

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23 hours ago, Snipper said:

According to that fount of all knowledge - the Sun - Katla is going to blow its top. https://apple.news/AcsxDLvtNSFyPfNheAaDVeQ

Should I be worried? Not that I am as it is the Sun. 

Defo seems like its building up to something and it does sound like its overdue a biggie, I wouldn't be worried, there is not much we can do about it.  When will it go up ... I don't think the experts really know and they have said as such in reports today. I understand this volcano is often more active in the autumn. I did read somewhere that if it goes up you should be able to hear the explosion as far away as Paris. No idea if that's really true or not.  :)

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Regarding Katla, there is nothing to indicate that the volcano is about to erupt. It may take still a few more years before an eruption takes place.

When she erupts, people around the volcano will be affected and the biggest danger are lahars because of the fast melting of the Myrdalsjokull glacier. There will be ashfall too in parts of Iceland but that depends on the wind direction. The biggest effect for the UK will be disruption to air traffic but again that's dependent on the wind direction. 

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1 hour ago, Yarmy said:

 

And the S  Times...

As long as it sells newsprint that is all any of them care about.

Anything to do with a natural disaster, and it will make millions for them.

(Including Climate  Science)….

MIA 

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Whether the air traffic disruption will be as bad depends on wind direction the type of ash and how big when the eruption comes which could years away. We had the same scare stories when BIg E erupted. 

Latest updates

SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Semisopochnoi volcano. Seismicity remains elevated, with intermittent bursts of tremor. No volcanic activity was detected by regional infrasound sensors or observed in partially cloudy satellite data over the past day.

Semisopochnoi is monitored with an on-island seismic network, and remotely by satellite and lightning sensors. An infrasound array on Adak Island may detect explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi with a 13 minute delay if atmospheric conditions permit.



VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Eruption of a lava flow from Veniaminof volcano's summit continues. Seismicity remains elevated with continuous tremor. Clear webcam images showed incandescence overnight. Webcam images from this morning have shown a gas plume from the summit, possibly containing minor amounts of ash, being blown to the northeast. Satellite data continue to show elevated surface temperatures. No significant ash emissions have been observed or reported.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin volcano. Seismicity activity remains elevated. No significant activity was observed in regional infrasound data or in mostly cloudy satellite images during the last 24 hours.

Great Sitkin volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland volcano. No significant activity has been detected in seismic or regional infrasound data. No activity was observed in mostly cloudy satellite images.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data. The web camera, one seismic station, and the local infrasound array are offline do to a equipment failure on September 23rd. This hampers efforts to rapidly detect explosive activity; however, Cleveland remains monitored with a single seismic station and regional instruments.

 

No change at Kilauea the quiet spell goes on.

 

 

 

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KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea summit and East Rift Zone

On Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone (ERZ), no significant incandescence was visible overnight in the collapse pit within the fissure 8 cone. Minor fuming has been visible during the day.

Seismicity and ground deformation remain low at the summit of Kīlauea. Tiltmeters around the Kilauea summit have recorded slowing deflationary tilt and slight inflationary tilt over recent days. Rates of tilting throughout both the summit and the ERZ are much lower than those observed during the recent period of major eruptive activity.

There has been no change in seismicity during the past week. Small aftershocks from the magnitude-6.9 earthquake in early May are still being generated along faults located on the south flank of Kīlauea.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and lower ERZ are drastically reduced; the combined rate is well less than 1,000 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. SO2 emission rates from the summit were approximately 30 tonnes/day on September 26, and emission rates from lower ERZ vents were below the detection threshold of the measurement technique when last measured on September 11. Minor amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are being emitted at the summit, at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and in the lower ERZ.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor Kīlauea’s seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of reactivation, and maintains visual surveillance of the summit and East Rift Zone. HVO will continue to issue daily updates and additional messages as needed.

 

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SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Semisopochnoi volcano. Seismicity remains elevated, with intermittent bursts of tremor. No volcanic activity was detected by regional infrasound sensors or observed in cloudy satellite data over the past day.

Semisopochnoi is monitored with an on-island seismic network, and remotely by satellite and lightning sensors. An infrasound array on Adak Island may detect explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi with a 13 minute delay if atmospheric conditions permit.



VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Veniaminof. Seismicity remains elevated with weak tremor, but levels have decreased since midweek. Webcam views of the volcano have been obscured by clouds. Cloudy satellite data over the past 24 hours show intermittent elevated surface temperatures. No significant ash emissions have been observed or reported.

Veniaminof Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin volcano. Seismicity activity remains elevated. No significant activity was observed in regional infrasound data or in cloudy satellite images during the last 24 hours.

Great Sitkin volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Cleveland volcano. No significant activity has been detected in seismic, regional infrasound, or mostly cloudy satellite data.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data. The web camera, one seismic station, and the local infrasound array are offline due to a equipment failure on September 23rd. This hampers efforts to rapidly detect explosive activity; however, Cleveland remains monitored with a single seismic station and regional instruments.

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