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The lowest pressure reading recorded in the UK

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925.6mb at Ochertyre, near Crieff, Perthshire on the 26th January 1884

Rslp18840127.gif

Here are some barometer readings of this remarkable depression.

London: barometer fell to 28.529" (966mb) at 7.30pm

Dr Beverly of Aberdeen at 11.30pm recorded a barometer reading at sea level of 27.381" (927.1mb)

Forest of Glen Tana, a reading of 27.39" (927.4mb) was recorded

Hitchin: 28.32" (959mb)

North Shields: 27.63" (936mb)

Cargen: 27.66" (936mb)

Oban: 27.39" (927.4mb)

Dublin: 28.15" (953mb)

Croydon: 28.548" (966mb) at 7.40pm

Worksop: 28.292" (958mb)

Some other weather reports

London: Violent SW gale

Stanmore: Terrific gale from SW to W after 4pm

Reigate: Violent storm with very low pressure

Croydon: Strong gale, max hourly velocity of wind 40 miles

Hythe: From 5.30 to 9.30pm, terrific hurricane, with heavy thunderstorm rain and hail

Littlehampton: Awful gale

St Lawrence: Severe SW gale with vivid lightning

Oundle: Hurricane with heavy rain, snow and lightning

Diss: Tremendous gale from west, thunderstorm in evening

Torquay: Fearful SW gale with rain, thunder and lightning

Coventry: Much lightning, violent wind and unusually low bar

Mansfield: Very violent gale with snow, vivid lightning and thunder

Macclesfield: Gales, snow, rain and lightning

Morpeth: A great gale with very low pressure

Penrith: Great storm with extremely low barometer

Elterwater: Great gale with snow, sleet and rain

Llanfrechfa Grange: Violent SW wind, thunder, lightning and rain

Girvan: Severe storm; pressure fell almost 2.5" very rapidly and rose again almost as quickly.

Cassillis: Storm of extraordinary severity with snow and rain

Keith: About two inches of snow fell with fearful drifts on the following day.

Aviemore: Severe gale from west, highland railway blocked by snow

Forsinard: High winds, snow and drifts

Castle Lough: Great storm with heavy rain followed by snow

Kilconnell: Violent storm from SW, veering to NW

Castlebar: Violent storm follwed by a fall of snow

Enniskillen: A very severe storm with remarkable fall of pressure; old trees which had stood for 130 years were blown down.

Newtownlands: The most terrific storm since 1839, wind 78 miles an hour.

Douglas: Hurricane from 4pm on 26th to 4am on 27th.

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That's an amazing chart!

A little more recently, I remember this one clearly:

post-2545-1218532632_thumb.png

The weather turned nasty about teatime on Sunday night in Perth, with about 1 foot of snow falling in no time at all. Come Monday morning, there was 10 foot drifts across our driveway and we were stranded for 3 days with no phone, heating, or water except for melted snow.

Late on the Tuesday it turned mild then by Thursday it was very warm:

post-2545-1218532943_thumb.png

.....leading to extensive flooding in Perth and eventually to the construction of a £25million flood barrier.

If something like this happened this winter I'm sure a state of National emergency would be called! :o

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Remarkably just 3 years after the January 1884 storm, the record came under threat when an exceptional depression tracked across northern parts of the UK on the 8th of December 1886 bringing with it widespread gales and squalls.

Rslp18861208.gif

Rslp18861209.gif

Belfast recorded a barometer reading of 927mb

lowa.jpg

Those values converted into millibars

Belfast: 927.1mb

Lurgan: 928.9mb

Cronkbourne: 933mb

Penrith: 933.4mb

Whitehaven: 933.5mb

Leith: 936.6mb

Bolton: 939.2mb

Meltham: 941.1mb

Hull: 941.9mb

Warrington: 942.0mb

Neston: 942.1mb

Much Wenlock: 947.7mb

Hillington: 950.2mb

Beckford: 953.4mb

Haverfordwest: 955.1mb

Berkhampstead: 957.4mb

Camden Square: 958.7mb (10pm), 958.1mb (4.45am)

Here is a graph of very low pressure readings recorded at Camden Square.

lowb.jpg

It is interesting to note that Camden Square's barometer was below 959mb for just over 10 hours.

A few reports

Langton Herring: There was a severe storm on the 8th and 9th, when pressure was low for many hours.

Stroud: Severe SW gale with thunder, lightning and hail on 8th

Woolstaston: There was a strong gale on the 8th and 9th with lightning and hail and a remarkable and long continued barometric depression, the lowest reading ever observed occurring about 9pm on the 8th.

Orleton: About 7pm, on the 8th, the bar stood at 27.83 inches (uncorrected) which was nearly a tenth of an inch lower than on the 13th January 1843

Haverfordwest: The damage done to forest trees during the great storm of the 7th and 8th perhaps exceeds anything in living memory.

Killaloe: A great storm occurred on the 8th with very low pressure, the period of greatest violence between 10pm and 1am.

Dublin: Pressure exceptionally low on 8th.

Edenful: On the 8th, we were here in the very centre of a barometric depression, lowere even than that of January 26th 1884. The lowest point was touched at 2pm, when a dead calm prevailed, nor was there any atmospheric disturbance till 1am next morning.

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A very interesting read there! The lowest readings I've recorded are 963mb on Friday 2nd December 2005 and 957mb on Monday 10th March 2008.

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What do you figure the GFS would have predicted at 96 hours for those two beauties?

I'm thinking 890 mbs. :)

Is that first storm the one associated with the Forth Bridge disaster by any chance?

Edited by Roger J Smith

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What do you figure the GFS would have predicted at 96 hours for those two beauties?

I'm thinking 890 mbs. B)

Is that first storm the one associated with the Forth Bridge disaster by any chance?

Morning Roger

link below

http://www.donowdo.com/articles/The-Forth-Bridge.htm

nigel

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925.6mb at Ochertyre, near Crieff, Perthshire on the 26th January 1884

Rslp18840127.gif

Here are some barometer readings of this remarkable depression.

London: barometer fell to 28.529" (966mb) at 7.30pm

Dr Beverly of Aberdeen at 11.30pm recorded a barometer reading at sea level of 27.381" (927.1mb)

Forest of Glen Tana, a reading of 27.39" (927.4mb) was recorded

Hitchin: 28.32" (959mb)

North Shields: 27.63" (936mb)

Cargen: 27.66" (936mb)

Oban: 27.39" (927.4mb)

Dublin: 28.15" (953mb)

Croydon: 28.548" (966mb) at 7.40pm

Worksop: 28.292" (958mb)

Some other weather reports

London: Violent SW gale

Stanmore: Terrific gale from SW to W after 4pm

Reigate: Violent storm with very low pressure

Croydon: Strong gale, max hourly velocity of wind 40 miles

Hythe: From 5.30 to 9.30pm, terrific hurricane, with heavy thunderstorm rain and hail

Littlehampton: Awful gale

St Lawrence: Severe SW gale with vivid lightning

Oundle: Hurricane with heavy rain, snow and lightning

Diss: Tremendous gale from west, thunderstorm in evening

Torquay: Fearful SW gale with rain, thunder and lightning

Coventry: Much lightning, violent wind and unusually low bar

Mansfield: Very violent gale with snow, vivid lightning and thunder

Macclesfield: Gales, snow, rain and lightning

Morpeth: A great gale with very low pressure

Penrith: Great storm with extremely low barometer

Elterwater: Great gale with snow, sleet and rain

Llanfrechfa Grange: Violent SW wind, thunder, lightning and rain

Girvan: Severe storm; pressure fell almost 2.5" very rapidly and rose again almost as quickly.

Cassillis: Storm of extraordinary severity with snow and rain

Keith: About two inches of snow fell with fearful drifts on the following day.

Aviemore: Severe gale from west, highland railway blocked by snow

Forsinard: High winds, snow and drifts

Castle Lough: Great storm with heavy rain followed by snow

Kilconnell: Violent storm from SW, veering to NW

Castlebar: Violent storm follwed by a fall of snow

Enniskillen: A very severe storm with remarkable fall of pressure; old trees which had stood for 130 years were blown down.

Newtownlands: The most terrific storm since 1839, wind 78 miles an hour.

Douglas: Hurricane from 4pm on 26th to 4am on 27th.

I believe this was the same storm that recorded a pressure at the Ben Nevis Summit Observatory at 2030 of 784.7mb (1343m). The story of the observer tying a rope around himself to attempt to read the temps and avoid being blown away is quite amusing. Succeeded at the third attempt!

Edited by weather ship
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Can I suggest the storms of January 12th and 13th 2005 over NW scotland as being close to those records. Im sure it was. Cookie you must have been terrified!

Edited by Ladyofthestorm

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Remarkably just 3 years after the January 1884 storm, the record came under threat when an exceptional depression tracked across northern parts of the UK on the 8th of December 1886 bringing with it widespread gales and squalls.

Rslp18861208.gif

Rslp18861209.gif

Belfast recorded a barometer reading of 927mb

lowa.jpg

Those values converted into millibars

Belfast: 927.1mb

Lurgan: 928.9mb

Cronkbourne: 933mb

Penrith: 933.4mb

Whitehaven: 933.5mb

Leith: 936.6mb

Bolton: 939.2mb

Meltham: 941.1mb

Hull: 941.9mb

Warrington: 942.0mb

Neston: 942.1mb

Much Wenlock: 947.7mb

Hillington: 950.2mb

Beckford: 953.4mb

Haverfordwest: 955.1mb

Berkhampstead: 957.4mb

Camden Square: 958.7mb (10pm), 958.1mb (4.45am)

Here is a graph of very low pressure readings recorded at Camden Square.

lowb.jpg

It is interesting to note that Camden Square's barometer was below 959mb for just over 10 hours.

A few reports

Langton Herring: There was a severe storm on the 8th and 9th, when pressure was low for many hours.

Stroud: Severe SW gale with thunder, lightning and hail on 8th

Woolstaston: There was a strong gale on the 8th and 9th with lightning and hail and a remarkable and long continued barometric depression, the lowest reading ever observed occurring about 9pm on the 8th.

Orleton: About 7pm, on the 8th, the bar stood at 27.83 inches (uncorrected) which was nearly a tenth of an inch lower than on the 13th January 1843

Haverfordwest: The damage done to forest trees during the great storm of the 7th and 8th perhaps exceeds anything in living memory.

Killaloe: A great storm occurred on the 8th with very low pressure, the period of greatest violence between 10pm and 1am.

Dublin: Pressure exceptionally low on 8th.

Edenful: On the 8th, we were here in the very centre of a barometric depression, lowere even than that of January 26th 1884. The lowest point was touched at 2pm, when a dead calm prevailed, nor was there any atmospheric disturbance till 1am next morning.

125 years since this event

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125 years since this event

Interesting how similar the storm shown on the ECM 00z looked to this event.

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That's an amazing chart!

A little more recently, I remember this one clearly:

post-2545-1218532632_thumb.png

The weather turned nasty about teatime on Sunday night in Perth, with about 1 foot of snow falling in no time at all. Come Monday morning, there was 10 foot drifts across our driveway and we were stranded for 3 days with no phone, heating, or water except for melted snow.

Late on the Tuesday it turned mild then by Thursday it was very warm:

post-2545-1218532943_thumb.png

.....leading to extensive flooding in Perth and eventually to the construction of a �25million flood barrier.

If something like this happened this winter I'm sure a state of National emergency would be called! ohmy.gif

Amazing snowy chart for north, but low lying areas south of Manchester usually see very little snow off that setup

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That's an amazing chart!

A little more recently, I remember this one clearly:

post-2545-1218532632_thumb.png

The weather turned nasty about teatime on Sunday night in Perth, with about 1 foot of snow falling in no time at all. Come Monday morning, there was 10 foot drifts across our driveway and we were stranded for 3 days with no phone, heating, or water except for melted snow.

Late on the Tuesday it turned mild then by Thursday it was very warm:

post-2545-1218532943_thumb.png

.....leading to extensive flooding in Perth and eventually to the construction of a �25million flood barrier.

If something like this happened this winter I'm sure a state of National emergency would be called! :o

It's the lowest pressure I have seen on a BBC forecast for the north Atlantic, a 909mb low

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