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How to predict thunder

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00-30AM- 07/01/08

I watched temp's fluctuate rapidly tonight and wondered why there were no thunder storms.What is the understood pattern to expect for them to occur?

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At this time of the year, thundery activity is most likely reserved to coastal regions as the warmer sea temps and the colder air aloft interact to encourage the air to rise...particularly after an active cold front has passed.

For more details check this excellent guide by Nick F: -

http://www.netweather.tv/forum/index.php?showtopic=29496

Excerpt that may be relevant for the coming week: -

Late October to Early March

This 'winter' period is when polar airmasses are likely to be colder than sea areas they cross, therefore the sea surface 'warms' the surface air layer causing parcels of air to rise up through the colder polar air above it and form cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds. Coastal areas of the UK during the winter see a higher frequency of thunderstorms than further inland, as the weaker sun during the period has little effect at warming the ground. NW, N, NE, E winds , and even W and SW winds via returning polar maritime air circulating around lows to the West commonly bring heavy showers of hail, sleet and snow accompanied by thunder to coastal areas of the UK in winter if cloud tops reach high enough. Sometimes, if the temperature gradient along a cold front is steep enough along cold fronts during winter thunder may accompany rain or even snow over inland areas aswell.

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At this time of the year, thundery activity is most likely reserved to coastal regions as the warmer sea temps and the colder air aloft interact to encourage the air to rise...particularly after an active cold front has passed.

For more details check this link: -

http://www.netweather.tv/forum/index.php?showtopic=29496

Excerpt that may be relevant for the coming week: -

:) Cheers

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:) Cheers

No problem....that link is a great guide for thunderstorm set-ups all year round in the UK.

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No problem....that link is a great guide for thunderstorm set-ups all year round in the UK.

i have just read the guide to thunderstorms set up,, it was really interesting,

as a young child i developed a phobia of t storms which has got worse over the years,, but desite this i am fasinated with them(as long as i'm not in them) and try to understand them

We do tend to get nasty storms down here, is that because i on the s-e coast only about half mile from sea and only 14m asl ??

and why do i get a migrane before a storm??

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I agree with Donna why do we get sore heads before one?

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I agree with Donna why do we get sore heads before one?

so i'm not alone then,, my mum and i always suffer before storms,,

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I just read some where that the oressure drops and only some people can feel it.

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How do you mean a smell?

My Grandad(a Farmer)used to say he could smell the ozone.Maybe it's just my senses being affected too coz I too smell thunder.Odd but not scientific

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Yes the air can smell differently but usually after the thunderstorm has passed. Ahead of the thunderstorm you will normally get slightly gusting winds of moist air (inflow region). I think it can be the humid air which triggers the initial headache. As the thunderstorm approaches then pressure lowers and everything takes on an electrical charge (st elmo's fire) and this can make headaches worse. The ozone smell from air broken down by lightening occurs while you are in the thunderstorm or in the outflow region of a storm.

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Yes the air can smell differently but usually after the thunderstorm has passed. Ahead of the thunderstorm you will normally get slightly gusting winds of moist air (inflow region). I think it can be the humid air which triggers the initial headache. As the thunderstorm approaches then pressure lowers and everything takes on an electrical charge (st elmo's fire) and this can make headaches worse. The ozone smell from air broken down by lightening occurs while you are in the thunderstorm or in the outflow region of a storm.

Thanks for that I will keep that in mind :doh:

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Yes the air can smell differently but usually after the thunderstorm has passed. Ahead of the thunderstorm you will normally get slightly gusting winds of moist air (inflow region). I think it can be the humid air which triggers the initial headache. As the thunderstorm approaches then pressure lowers and everything takes on an electrical charge (st elmo's fire) and this can make headaches worse. The ozone smell from air broken down by lightening occurs while you are in the thunderstorm or in the outflow region of a storm.

yep..........thinking about it you're quite correct....Cheers BF :doh:

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