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noggin

Altocumulus Castellanus

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Hi there Noggin,

Glad someone's come up with a sillier alias than mine, the clouds in the photo are in fact Altocumulus Floccus or Flo for short personally I think they look more like ghosts than jellyfish but either way they are beautiful, they are certainly not as rare as the article would have you believe either, look out for them during humid late summer when they can herald a thundery breakdown, Altocumulus Castellanus are convective clouds again rising from middle level they have the look of "castles in the sky" very distinctive and also indictative of a potential thundery breakdown.

There is an online cloud atlas somewhere that shows each type in all it's glory, if I can find it I will post you a link.

Regards

Dave

Here you go........

http://www.bp.com/managedlistingsection.do...contentId=57766

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Thanks for that, spodo. I admit to knowing very little about clouds. So many times have I said I don't believe what I read in the media and here I am believing what they said about clouds! :lol: :lol:

I'll try that link as I would like to be able to identify clouds. I remember learning about different types of clouds at school, but that was so long ago that I have forgotten everything I learned!

Sadly, they don't seem to teach this sort of thing at school now, which is a shame. Let us not go into what they do get taught!

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Thanks for that, spodo. I admit to knowing very little about clouds. So many times have

Sadly, they don't seem to teach this sort of thing at school now, which is a shame. Let us not go into what they do get taught!

I too was taught cloud types in middle school and had also long since forgotten them until I became a member here. As for what they teach 'em now, well, from what I hear I think I'm just going to give up. I think they hand out GCSEs like sweets these days... :)

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I too was taught cloud types in middle school and had also long since forgotten them until I became a member here. As for what they teach 'em now, well, from what I hear I think I'm just going to give up. I think they hand out GCSEs like sweets these days... :)

GCSE were much better in the 1980's weren't they?

Our Geography teacher was excellent and set a project for our class for each of us

to write-up a report about the October 1987 storm. This was only a day or so after

this big storm occured.

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Hello,

I didn't realise that they are supposed to be that rare, I've seen them many times, perhaps Mark was mis-quoted in the name of making a newspaper story more interesting?...

Very Best Wishes,

Bob.

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Hello,

I didn't realise that they are supposed to be that rare, I've seen them many times, perhaps Mark was mis-quoted in the name of making a newspaper story more interesting?...

Very Best Wishes,

Bob.

Bit misleading that article, as is often the case with journalism wrt to weather, Altocumulus Castellanus are fairly common clouds in the summer when there is mid-level convection resulting from destabilisation of elevated warm moist layers, but the 'jellyfish' appearance of Ac cas is probably more unusual, not the cloud type itself - which usually takes the form of turreted/towering mid-level cloud with high bases.

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Bit misleading that article, as is often the case with journalism wrt to weather, Altocumulus Castellanus are fairly common clouds in the summer when there is mid-level convection resulting from destabilisation of elevated warm moist layers, but the 'jellyfish' appearance of Ac cas is probably more unusual, not the cloud type itself - which usually takes the form of turreted/towering mid-level cloud with high bases.

Hello Nick,

I was in fact referring to the particular kind of Altocumulus Castellanus, with Virga, as is shown in the illustration. Virga is the particular element of the cloud which gives it the Jellyfish appearance.

The first instance I saw of that cloud type was in 2001, when my interest in Meteorology started to increase. At that time, I wasn't sure of what I had seen, so I emailed the current BBC Bristol forecaster (who still holds the reins now). He gave me that particular cloud name. I have indeed seen those clouds, with Virga, several times since, the most recent being on August 1st, in Bristol.

Very Best Wishes,

Bob.

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