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Costa Del Fal

Headache Before Thunderstorm

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Yes, I usually get a headache just before a storm and also that disorientating pressure feeling around my head. Sometimes causes a nauseous feeling too.

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I had a headache yesterday evening which cleared up as soon as it started thundering.

But then it came back.

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Tests were carried out on women in Germany,no direct link between sferics and headaches was reached...Yet i know people who get headaches before storms but like what has been already said already they could be many factors a small report can be seen here..

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?c...p;dopt=Abstract

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Morning all

well i suffer from cluster headaches and migrains, it runs in the family but i have to say during a period of low pressure driven weather that i do suffer more than at any other time. ive had a headache all week and even this morning i have a muzzy head. i take tablets to lessen the effects but these past few days ive just not been able to shake it at all.

LO

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I get a headache when the storms miss me :wallbash: Can't think why!

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There may be some truth in it, but I don't know how much. I haven't noticed a tendency to get headaches before storms, but I often get headaches when the weather is generally warm and humid.

It would be interesting to see relationships between sferics in particular atmospheric conditions and headaches. Maybe headaches tend to occur partly as a result of the warm humid continental southerly airmasses that bring a majority of the major thunderstorms for many parts of Britain?

Weather certainly affects the human body, though probably differently for different individuals (for example I don't believe that this "the ideal room temperature is 25C" applies to everyone; I find perfect room temperature to be around 22-23C). Some can cope with storms more than others, some can cope with cold, biting winds, heat, pollution etc. more than others. There's also the psychological impact of weather types depending on one's preferences; for instance if one likes snow, then the cold feels easier to put up with on a snowy day (and of course vice versa).

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I have always had headaches before storms, often before the cloudscape looks threatening. Headaches have become milder in later years and due to the number of hangovers (!) it is sometimes hard to tell the difference now! But as a kid I had a huge phobia of storms and the headache predictor thing sure came in handy for getting me ready to close the curtains and find some ear plugs!

Always thought I was 'odd' by getting them but from reading weather forums it seems this is quite a common occurance.

Last night I got one about an hour before the thunder came, although in West London we were in the small wedge you see on the sferic plots that managed to miss nearly all the main action! We only got a few rumbles from an edge of a cell that clipped past. Which seeing as I conquered my phobia as a teenager to the point I absoutley love storms now was a major frustration!

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It MAY, not sure, but something to do with the atmosphere becoming charged with positive ions.sure i read it somewhere. :D

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The most important thing (IMO) is the positive ionic charge that builds up prior to any fireworks. The effect of a negatively charged ionic anomaly is to reduce the speed at which synapses can pass information, yer brain slows down, the opposite is true of positive Anoms.

If you think of the 'calming effect' of waterfalls,seaside,moon rise,post storm clearances then you know what the negative anomaly does for you. The Nemesis of this 'chill' is the brainstorm that positive anomalies provide.

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This is most probably yet another calamitous manifestation of the dreaded global warming, caused by the increased number of carbons bearing down on one’s cranium.

I, however, don’t believe in carbons so I’m not effected, although I do occasionally get synisitus sinnusitis cynictus a sore nose.

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This is most probably yet another calamitous manifestation of the dreaded global warming, caused by the increased number of carbons bearing down on one's cranium.

I, however, don't believe in carbons so I'm not effected, although I do occasionally get synisitus sinnusitis cynictus a sore nose.

But that's because women keep punching you for your impertinence isn't it?

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But that's because women keep punching you for your impertinence isn't it?

Actually, some go out of their way just for a bit of my impertiness.

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I would suggest the headache is caused by unique areas of lower pressure around thunderstorm, causing the veins in the head to retract - similar to that of when you land in a plane. Similar things happen when there are strong areas of low pressure moving through. Lots of people have commented about getting headaches when a strong cold front moves through when low pressure moves in from the west (even with no thunder), due to rapid falls in air pressure after a high pressure over 1030mb.

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I often get headaches when stormy weather is around, the air pressure stuff aside thunderstorms have been known to trigger asthma attacks and have suffered with this myself as a kid on a couple of occasions whenever large thunderstorms were looming.

Probably a result of the storms air currents carrying allergens etc over large distances and spreadding them out with the down drafts etc like salt off a gritting lorry.

Which may explain the headaches as well and their apparent increase with muggy weather.

See these:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1332404.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/5072530.stm

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I get quite bad headaches when the air pressure is high (above 1035mb).

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Anti- Mild

i usually get headaches, especially when there is high pressure around

My wife had a splitting headache yesterday , just before we got the Thunder

nigel

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I find I often get headaches in humid conditions. Ireland doesn't get much t-storms but when i'm in france/italy i usually always get headaches before there are storms on a hot day.

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