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Hurricane Andrew

Worldwide Storm Video And Photographs (Youtube Etc)

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Ha found it..!! It was in Elie Manitoba June 22 2007, more footage here

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WOW!!!! That is a stonking bit of footage there Paul!! Great find mate...

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I had an idea it was the Manitoba tornado. there's another video of the tornado out there filmed from a car and you can hear the weather alerts being given out over the radio. Will try and find the link for it.

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There's another angle of this Elie tornado on the Storms of 2007 DVD which I recently got. It's taken from the other side of town and is much closer to the tornado. The amount of debris being kicked up is amazing. The tornado was on the ground for 35 minutes which is quite a long time for a tornado, but it only covered 3.6 miles. You probably could have outrun this tornado on foot if you had to which might explain the lack of injuries it caused.

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wow those videos are brilliant!!

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This video, shot by surveillance cameras at the ATM in the drive-up lane

at the First State Bank in Parkersburg, Iowa, shows a home in Parkersburg

being destroyed by an EF-5 tornado on Sunday, May 25, 2008. The video was

provided by First State Bank officials.

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As we look back at the weather events of 2008, perhaps the most impressive record set during the year occurred during Hurricane Gustav, which pounded Cuba as a Category 4 hurricane in August. Gustav set a new world record for highest wind gust ever measured in a hurricane. As Gustav passed over the Paso Real de San Diego meteorological station in the western Cuban province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, on the afternoon of August 30, 2008, a wind gust of 212 mph (340 km/hr) was recorded. The powerful winds blew down the anemometer, and it is possible that higher gusts occurred after the instrument failed. Not only is this the highest wind speed ever measured in a hurricane, it is the highest wind gust ever measured at a non-mountain location on Earth, and is the second highest wind gust ever measured on the surface of the planet. The highest wind speed ever measured was 231 mph (370 km/hr) on the top of Mt. Washington, New Hampshire, on April 12, 1934, during passage of an extratropical storm. The previous record highest wind gust measured at a non-mountain surface location was the 207 mph wind gust measured in Greenland at Thule Air Force Base on March 6, 1972. The previous highest wind gust measured in a hurricane was 186 mph at Blue Hill Observatory, Massachusetts, during the notorious 1938 "Long Island Express" hurricane.

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Figure 1. Anemometer used to measure the record 212 mph gust in Hurricane Gustav. Gustav's powerful winds flattened the instrument against the roof of the observing station. Image credit: Jose M. Rubiera Torres, Instituto de Meteorologia of Cuba.

Is this a believable record?

The instrument used for the measurement in Gustav was a Dines pressure tube anemometer mounted on the roof of the weather office. According to Jose M. Rubiera Torres of Cuba's Instituto de Meteorologia, "The graph is neat and the instrument was in perfect technical working condition. The wind peaked up to 340 km/h and then the anemometer mast fell over the concrete roof of the station's building, sharply interrupting the measurement. The graph [Figure 2], shows that wind gusts were increasing at a regular pace with time, until the instrument broke down when it got to the 340 km/h mark." Dines anemometers have a proven track record of reliability, and have been used in Cuba for over 60 years. A formal committee under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is currently evaluating the data, and will render a decision of the validity of the record by February of 2009.

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Figure 2. Trace of the Dines anemometer used to measure the record 212 mph gust in Hurricane Gustav. Image credit: Jose M. Rubiera Torres, Instituto de Meteorologia of Cuba.

How did such a strong gust occur?

At the time Hurricane Gustav moved over the Paso Real de San Diego meteorological station, the storm was rated? a Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 150 mph, gusting to 185 mph. When the peak wind gust of 212 mph was measured at 22:35 GMT, the western eyewall of Gustav was over the anemometer site, as seen on Cuban radar (Figure 3). The town of Paso Real de San Diego is at an elevation of about 40 meters, and lies 25 km inland, about 12 km south of a rugged line of mountains up to 1200 meters high. The counter-clockwise flow of air around Gustav's eyewall meant that the winds arriving at Paso Real de San Diego were forced to pass over these mountains first. The mountains probably focused and accelerated the winds through gaps between the peaks, and the air accelerated further as it rushed downhill under the force of gravity. Strong downbursts due to collapsing precipitation cores inside Gustav's eyewall probably contributed to the extreme gusts. When hurricanes make landfall, the intense thunderstorm cells that comprise the eyewall sometimes collapse suddenly, sending a downward cascade of intense winds to the surface. When this rush of wind hits the ground, it spreads out in all directions, forming a strong surface wind event known as a downburst. It has been theorized that some of the extreme damage noted in Florida during Hurricane Ivan in 2004 and Hurricane Andrew in 1992 may have been associated with downbursts from collapsing eyewall thunderstorm cells. This behavior may also be responsible for some of the extreme damage in Mississippi from Hurricane Katrina. Animations of infrared satellite imagery available from the University of Wisconsin CIMSS Satellite Blog show that the eyewall of Gustav collapsed during passage over the high mountains to the north of Paso Real de San Diego, but this occurred after the world record wind gust was measured.

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Figure 3. Radar image of Hurricane Gustav (top) at 22:25 GMT on August 30 2008, five minutes before the world record 212 mph hurricane wind gust was measured. The site of the Paso Real de San Diego meteorological station where the record was set is marked with a red dot. A topographic map (bottom) shows the line of mountains up to 1200 meters high that lies just north of the town. The counter-clockwise flow of air around the eye of Gustav brought the strongest winds of Gustav across the mountain range then downhill to Paso Real de San Diego. Radar image credit: Instituto de Meteorologia of Cuba. Topographic map image credit: Wikipedia.

I'll have a new blog post next year, on Monday. Happy New Year, everyone!

Jeff Masters

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will that be a hurricane blog mate?

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The top U.S. weather story of 2008 was undoubtedly Hurricane Ike. The National Hurricane Center has released its summary of Ike, and here are some of the highlights:

Ike did $19.3 billion in damage to the U.S.--fourth costliest hurricane on record, behind Katrina, Andrew, and Wilma.

Ike did an additional $4.4 billion in damage after it became extratropical. Hurricane-force wind gusts were reported in Cincinnati, and 2.6 million people lost power in Ohio. The $2.2 billion in damage to Ohio rivaled the 1974 Xenia tornado as that state's costliest natural disaster ever. Ike's remnants also caused Kentucky's most widespread power outage in history (600,000 customers).

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Figure 1. Ike's tremendous storm surge wiped most of the Bolivar Peninsula north of Galveston clean. Image credit: Nationa Weather Service, Houston/Galveston Office.

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Figure 2. Standard 20 foot high utility pole on the Bolivar Peninsula, with debris caught about 18 feet high. The pole stands about 2 feet above sea level. The combined action of the storm surge and waves on to of the surge (wave run-up) deposited the debris at the top of this pole. Image credit: an email that I got that I will find and post the credit for later today.

Ike produced a 15-20 foot high storm surge along the east side of Galveston Bay and along the Bolivar Peninsula just to the north of Galveston. This was the second highest storm surge recorded in Texas, behind the 22.1 foot surge of Hurricane Carla in 1961. It is likely that the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900 and and the 1915 Galveston hurricane had higher storm surges, though, since they were both Category 4 storms. Although Ike was a strong Category 2 hurricane at landfall, its storm surge was characteristic of a strong Category 3 hurricane.

Ike's 10-13 foot storm surge pushed 30 miles inland in Southwest Louisiana, reaching the town of Lake Charles. Isolated areas in Jefferson County, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana, had surge heights up to 17 ft. Ike's storm surge was 11 feet at Port Arthur, Texas,

Ike killed 20 people in Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. Another 34 people from Galveston and the hard-hit Bolivar Peninsula remain missing, according to the Laura Recovery Center, putting Ike's presumed U.S. death toll at 54. This makes Ike the 30th deadliest hurricane in U.S. history. An additional 64 indirect deaths occurred in Texas as a result of electrocution, carbon monoxide poisoning, and pre-existing medical complications. At least 28 direct and indirect deaths were reported in Tennessee, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Michigan, and Pennsylvania from Ike's remnants. This makes the total death toll from Ike 146, due to direct and indirect deaths, with those people missing presumed dead.

Ike disrupted power to 7.5 million people--the highest ever for a hurricane (Hurricane Frances of 2004 and Hurricane Isabel of 2003 are in second place, with 6 million people affected). The "Superstorm" Blizzard of 1993 (10 million people affected) was the only weather-related disaster to knock out power to more people than Ike in the U.S. Texas and Louisiana had 2.6 million affected, Ohio 2.6 million, and Kentucky 600,000. Power outage figures are difficult to verify and collect, so if anyone has a better list of power outage figures from major weather disasters, I'd like to hear them: [email protected]

The oil industry was hit hard, with ten offshore rigs destroyed, two large pipelines damaged, and fourteen refineries forced to close. Damage to the Ports of Galveston and Houston, as well as debris in Galveston Bay and the Houston Ship Channel, kept those ports closed after the storm for several days, leaving almost 150 tankers, cargo vessels, and container ships waiting offshore.

Ike damaged Galveston's 14-17 foot high protective sea wall, exposing wooden pilings that support its older sections. The storm also washed away the 70-foot wide beach that helped protect the seawall. As a result, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is undertaking the seawall's first major repair job in its 105-year history. About $10 million will be spent repairing the seawall, and an additional $10 million will be spent dumping 400,000 cubic yards of sand to replenish the lost beach.

Outside the U.S.

Cuba suffered $3-$4 billion in damage, and 2.6 million people were forced to evacuate (23% of the population).

The Southeast Bahamas suffered $50-200 million in damage. Additional heavy damage occurred on the nearby Turks and Caicos Islands.

Haiti probably suffered the most from Ike, with 74 deaths and ruinous flooding.

I'll have a new post Friday.

Jeff Masters

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David Drummond (US stormchaser) films a burning fuel depot at Lamesa Texas which

was struck by lightning on the 14th of last month. Even when tornadoes are few and far

between chasing can still be very dangerous..!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxcI0_43xO8

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:):)

Edited by neilsouth

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Nice i was in Orlando in May 22 2009 for a week and we had plenty of thunderstorms, strong winds, torrential squally rain but also some hot sunshine too! Nothing as bad as this though! Great vids!

Edited by Marcus_surfer

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I would love to experience something like this !

Really puts our SEVERE weather warning storms to shame lol

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I want some of those :doh:

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Great vids, now that is what you call a storm, the rain is amazing. Posted Image

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I want some of those Posted Image

I wish, wouldn't that be great! it looked a very eventful night just across the water. Posted Image

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WOW!!!

That is some spectacular lightning! I want but in Britain just doesnt let you have that! :doh:

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