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Weather-history

Cold January/very mild February 1945

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January and February 1945 could not be any more different. January was cold and snowy, whilst February was exceptionally mild

Early January 1945 began with a northerly across the UK and this gave snow and frosts.

Rslp19450104.gif

An easterly flow developed across the south and this was not especially cold but it did give wintry showers in the flow

Rslp19450112.gif

A vigorous low swung across the UK on the 18th bringing severe gales to the south and as it pulled away to the east it dragged a very cold Arctic flow across the UK and the start of the coldest spell of the winter.

Rslp19450118.gif

With cold air entrenched and low pressure across the UK, snowfalls were widespread. Frosts became very severe with minima below -10C at times.

Rslp19450123.gif

At the end of the month, Atlantic systems pushed through and it became milder.

Rslp19450130.gif

The weather was then mild with a zonal flow with maxima into double digits into February

Rslp19450207.gif

The weather became exceptionally mild as tropical maritime air flooded NEwards with maxima widely getting into the teens and high as 18.3C on the 18th

Rslp19450218.gif

The rest of the month was mild

Data

January 1945: 0.4 (-3. :D

February 1945: 7.1 (+2. :nonono:

February 1945 is joint 6th mildest on record.

Jan mean max: 3.0

Feb mean max: 10.2

Jan mean min: -2.2

Feb mean min: 4.0

Coldest CET minimum: -10.6 (26th Jan)

Mildest CET maximum: 15.0 (18th Feb)

Second half of January: -0.8

First half of February: 7.0

20th-29th January: -3.5

18th-28th February: 8.1

February was heralding an exceptionally mild spring, the 2nd mildest on record with 10.1

The period February-May 1945 had a CET of 9.5

Feb: 7.1 (+2. :blush:

Mar: 7.9 (+2.2)

Apr: 10.1 +2.3)

May: 12.2 (+0.7)

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The sudden thaw of early feb 1945...brought the red armies advance on berlin to a shuddering halt..and prolonged the war in europe by anotha 3 months..and thus strengthed the allied position in europe during the cold war and possible prevented a later world war 3 had the russians reached the rhine in 1945..dont you know!

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Hi!  I'm a documentary filmmaker and would like to know more about the weather in February/March/April 1945, but at this moment I am particularly interested in the weather on February 4, 1945.   Do you know how I would find the temperature for that morning and the following days?  

Many thanks,

 

Stacey Fitzgerald 

www.rememberravensbruck.com

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Sfitz said:

Hi!  I'm a documentary filmmaker and would like to know more about the weather in February/March/April 1945, but at this moment I am particularly interested in the weather on February 4, 1945.   Do you know how I would find the temperature for that morning and the following days?  

Many thanks,

 

Stacey Fitzgerald 

www.rememberravensbruck.com

Hi Stacey. For the UK, it was an exceptionally mild period.

You could try the Met Office digital library

https://digital.nmla.metoffice.gov.uk/deliverableUnit_bc9ee38f-94dd-4923-977a-8619d32c2f2b/

 

https://digital.nmla.metoffice.gov.uk/digitalFile_3b68dfae-db40-4c08-81c6-849be7f8e05e/

 

Edited by Weather-history

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On 04/12/2006 at 22:06, cheeky_monkey said:

The sudden thaw of early feb 1945...brought the red armies advance on berlin to a shuddering halt..and prolonged the war in europe by anotha 3 months..and thus strengthed the allied position in europe during the cold war and possible prevented a later world war 3 had the russians reached the rhine in 1945..dont you know!

The carving up of Europe after WW2 was decided by a series of Summits,in fact the Yalta summit was taking place at this exact time.I don't think this weather had any bearing on the outcome of any border.

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On 21/07/2019 at 11:48, hillbilly said:

The carving up of Europe after WW2 was decided by a series of Summits,in fact the Yalta summit was taking place at this exact time.I don't think this weather had any bearing on the outcome of any border.

actually it did if you know your history..solely because Stalin decided to interpret the results of the Tehran and Yalta summit to which ever way suited his agenda and of course where the allied armies eventually ended up....for instance the current Oder/Neisse border between current day Poland and Germany was supposed to be the eastern Neisse river boundary not the current Western Niesse river..also the city of Stettin was to remain part of Germany but is now in Poland and called Szczecin..another interesting fact that is weather related to this is that the Russians brought forward their winter offensive from Jan 20th to Jan 12th to get as far west as possible before the thaw set in.

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The same sequence of temperatures was observed in eastern North America also. January 1945 at Toronto had an average of -9.4, and it was particularly cold around the 25th (minimum -25 C). There was no rain during the month and a total of 46 cms snow. Then February had a much more normal -3.3 C average, and roughly equal amounts of rain and snow (in liquid equivalent terms) which for Toronto is a normal outcome in either January or February. March 1945 and the first half of April were record breaking warm, with readings as high as 90 F in New York City at the end of March, then after mid-April it turned quite cold and stayed that way through May 1945 into early June 1945 which had the only recorded trace of snow for June in station history at Toronto's downtown location. Those are all similar trends although the cooling towards May/June was less pronounced in the CET. After several record highs in mid-April (CET) there was a record low at the end of April. 

It is unusual for Toronto and CET temperatures to remain in phase for an extended period, especially when cold is involved as well as warmth. By the winter of 1946-47 the trends were largely out of phase. 

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