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Solar and Aurora Activity Chat


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Just a few pics from early this morning at West Sands, St. Andrews  First one was 100iso eq @ f1.8 and 10 sec exposure, strong moonlight about midnight with the faintest of hint of an aurora.

From Salon on the Isle Of Rum & The Isle Of Lewis tonight. Credit; Martin Keivers and Emma Mitchell.  

More shots here from Scotland last night. Fingers crossed again tonight as there is another predicted Kp7 ☺

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Tomorrow likely to the 600th spotless day of the minimum. 

Still a way to go to beat the 801 days from SC23/24 transition, but not completely out of the question given how few sunspots have been on offer during the second half of this year.

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2 hours ago, Stu_London said:

Tomorrow likely to the 600th spotless day of the minimum. 

Still a way to go to beat the 801 days from SC23/24 transition, but not completely out of the question given how few sunspots have been on offer during the second half of this year.

should surpass it by this time next year.

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THE SOLAR WIND HAS ARRIVED: Earth is entering a stream of solar wind flowing from a sprawling hole in the sun's atmosphere. First contact with the gaseous material on Nov. 20th produced an outburst of auroras over Scandinavia. Markus Varik sends this picture from Tromsø, Norway:

butterfly_strip Aura Butterfly over Tromso, Norway.jpg

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32 minutes ago, Katrine Basso said:

THE SOLAR WIND HAS ARRIVED: Earth is entering a stream of solar wind flowing from a sprawling hole in the sun's atmosphere. First contact with the gaseous material on Nov. 20th produced an outburst of auroras over Scandinavia. Markus Varik sends this picture from Tromsø, Norway:

butterfly_strip Aura Butterfly over Tromso, Norway.jpg

stunning

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6 hours ago, Twilight said:

I'm sorry I don't follow this as closely as u guys can u explain this please.

hi, if sunspotless days continue up until december 15th, then we will have equaled the amount of sunspotless days that occured in the previous solar cycle 23, during the year 2008. 2008 reached a maximum of 268 sunspotless days, and we are on course to match and even surpass that number given that we have 16 more days left of december 2019. In solar maximum periods, sunspots are plentiful and can give minor and major flares and given the strength an if the flare hits earth directly, it can be troublesome for our electrical infrastructure.

hope this helps

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11 minutes ago, Minus 10 said:

hi, if sunspotless days continue up until december 15th, then we will have equaled the amount of sunspotless days that occured in the previous solar cycle 23, during the year 2008. 2008 reached a maximum of 268 sunspotless days, and we are on course to match and even surpass that number given that we have 16 more days left of december 2019. In solar maximum periods, sunspots are plentiful and can give minor and major flares and given the strength an if the flare hits earth directly, it can be troublesome for our electrical infrastructure.

hope this helps

Almost, but not quite. 268 is the SIDC count, so you need to use the current SIDC count to compare. The current number of 249 spotless days on spaceweather.com is the Boulder count. The current SIDC count is 243 (190 up to the end of Sep then 29 for Oct and 24 in Nov days since then). So Dec 21st or so, assuming no spots appear.

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