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Solar and Aurora Activity Chat

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IT MUST BE SEPTEMBER: Studies show that September is one of the very best months for auroras. At this time of year around the Arctic Circle, the lights often appear for no apparent reason. That's exactly what happened last night. With no geomagnetic storm to provoke a display, one appeared anyway:

auroras_strip It must be September.jpg

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14 days blank, 183 for 2019 70%

Solar flux 69

Thermosphere: 4.14

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15 days blank, 184 for 2019 70%

Solar flux 68

Thermosphere: 4.14

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16 days blank, 185 days for 2019 71%

Solar flux 66

Thermosphere: 4.20

Edited by SteveB

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Ticking along nicely, unless there is a massive up-tick in spots, we should easily see 230-240 spotless day's for 2019!

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6 minutes ago, SteveB said:

Ticking along nicely, unless there is a massive up-tick in spots, we should easily see 230-240 spotless day's for 2019!

we have 105 days to 2020 I would expect the spotless days to be around the 275 mark

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Running at more than 90% spotless for Q3 so yes, a similar rate in Q3 would see us fighting 2008 and 2009. An extremely deep solar minima.

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48 minutes ago, summer blizzard said:

Running at more than 90% spotless for Q3 so yes, a similar rate in Q3 would see us fighting 2008 and 2009. An extremely deep solar minima.

Well lets just hope we get a cold winter in the next few years as a result!

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7 hours ago, jonboy said:

we have 105 days to 2020 I would expect the spotless days to be around the 275 mark

Yep, I was being conservative. 

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17 days blank, 187 for 2019 71%

Solar flux 67

Thermosphere: 4.26

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NORTHERN LIGHTS AND A LUNAR FOGBOW: The end of summer is a good time to be in Aslaska. Specifically, on the foggy banks of the Coleville River Delta. Last night, photographer James Helmericks was there, and this is what he saw:

fogbow_stripNorthern Lights and a Lunar Fog bow.jpg

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18 days blank, 187 for 2019 71%

Solar flux 67

Thermosphere:4.22

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EQUINOX AURORAS: Auroras love equinoxes. At this time of year even a gentle gust of solar wind can spark bright auroras around the Arctic Circle. Petra Schneider sends this example of the phenomenon from Hamarøy, Norway:

equinox_strip Equinox Aurora.jpg

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19 days blank, 187 for 2019 71%

Solar flux 68

Thermosphere: 4.21

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"It unbelievable show last night in the Lofoten islands," says Cooper.

No geomagnetic storm was in progress on Sept. 21st when Cooper took the picture. Instead, a minor solar wind stream was brushing against Earth's magnetic field--barely elevating the background density and speed of gaseous material flowing around our planet.

equinox_strip Lofoten islands.jpg

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Sunspot number: 0

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 20 days
2019 total: 189 days (71%)

The Radio Sun
10.7 cm flux: 68 sfu

Thermosphere Climate Index
today: 4.21x1010 W Cold

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Must surely overtake last year's spotless total now 

2019 total: 189 days (71%)
2018 total: 221 days (61%)

Not sure about the spotless totals from the previous solar minimum though

2009 total: 260 days (71%)
2008 total: 268 days (73%)

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Have a quick question, how would the solar minimum of cycle 24 compare against minimums in Dalton or Mauder. Is there any data where I can compare the years without sunspots of 2008 and 2009 with Dalton Miminum years 

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19 hours ago, jules216 said:

Have a quick question, how would the solar minimum of cycle 24 compare against minimums in Dalton or Mauder. Is there any data where I can compare the years without sunspots of 2008 and 2009 with Dalton Miminum years 

The SILSO series goes back hundreds of years, but not all the way to the Maunder min:

http://sidc.oma.be/silso/datafiles

 

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21 days blank,  192 for 2019 72%

Solar flux 66

Thermosphere: 4.18

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AURORAS--NO GEOMAGNETIC STORM REQUIRED: Last night outside Fairbanks, Alaska, curtains of green descended from the sky. "It started just after sunset on Sept. 23rd," reports  Sacha Layos, who photographed the display:

alaska_strip auroas - no geomagnetic storm.jpg

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