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Solar and Aurora Activity Chat


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Just a few pics from early this morning at West Sands, St. Andrews  First one was 100iso eq @ f1.8 and 10 sec exposure, strong moonlight about midnight with the faintest of hint of an aurora.

More shots here from Scotland last night. Fingers crossed again tonight as there is another predicted Kp7 ☺

From Salon on the Isle Of Rum & The Isle Of Lewis tonight. Credit; Martin Keivers and Emma Mitchell.  

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 A CME sideswiped Earth's magnetic field on Oct. 14th. Shortly thereafter, Earth passed through a fold in the heliospheric current sheet (a "solar sector boundary crossing"). The combined effect was to ignite a spectacular light show around the Arctic Circle. "Auroras were running across the sky as soon as the daylight faded," reports Frank Olsen who sends this picture from Sortland, Norway:


auroras_strip.jpg


"The display lasted for more than 10 hours, and was still going on at 5 am Norwegian time on Oct. 15th," continues Olsen. "This night has been awesome!"


Arctic sky watchers should remain alert for auroras on Oct. 15-16. Earth's magnetic field is still reverberating from the CME strike and the solar sector boundary crossing. NOAA forecasters estimate a whopping 50% chance of polar geomagnetic storms during the next 24 hours.  http://spaceweather.com/


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Update (8:30 AM PDT): Remarkably, this explosion did not yield a significant CME. Just-arriving coronagraph images from SOHO show no cloud emerging from the blast site.

Big sunspots tend to produce big flares, and clearly AR2192 is no exception. More X-flares are likely as AR2192 turns toward Earth in the days ahead. Also, if you have a solar telescope, point it at the sun. This active region is a real beautyhttp://spaceweather.com/

 

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I'm surprised there's been no chat about the largest collection of sunspots for 25 years? They're keeping a close eye on them of course, there's a chance of flares that could cause a few problems for us.

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I'm surprised there's been no chat about the largest collection of sunspots for 25 years? They're keeping a close eye on them of course, there's a chance of flares that could cause a few problems for us.

 

Don't understand your comment at all can you please explain what you mean by 'largest collection of sunspots'

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Don't understand your comment at all can you please explain what you mean by 'largest collection of sunspots'

An area of sunspots has been growing, a few days ago it was the largest area for 5 years, then 11 years, according to a post by Simon King, it is now the largest area for 25 years.

post-15177-0-65310400-1414062952_thumb.j

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It is true that sunspot 2192 at 69095 pixels is the largest sunspot of this cycle whether for the last twenty five years i can't verify. This sunspot if flaring well but is yet to produce a CME of any significance

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X3+ Flare ! From giant sunspot AR2192.

 

goes-xray-flux.gif

 

CHANCE OF FLARES: Despite shrinking by ~10% on Oct. 24th, sunspot AR2192 remains the largest and most active sunspot of the current solar cycle. By far. NOAA forecasters estimate an 85% chance of M-class flares and a 45% chance of X-flares on Oct. 25th. http://spaceweather.com/

 

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