Jump to content
shuggee

Solar and Aurora Activity Chat

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, karyo said:

Good to see that the new sunspot died a death before it got a chance to be counted.

Yes, it meant we could get into double figures.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KP5 aurora activity expected tonight, northern parts of Scotland may get lucky. May go for a long drive later.... :clap:

5acdff19363ef_ScreenShot2018-04-11at13_26_43.thumb.png.b2d401fba28e80ef7922742502721b5c.png

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And we keep on counting... :)

11 day's blank, 63 for 2018, 61%

The solar flux has dropped to 68

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sunspot count has not been this low for many years. I wonder if the sunspot count on spaceweather for the years 2009 and 2010  are using the old sunspot count method or the new method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sun is blank again

1 day blank, 64 for 2018 61%

Solar flux 71

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 days blank, 64 for 2018, 61%

Solar flux 69

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blank again.....yet I see two spots (one yesterday & one today) that aren't counted? In the past I've seen much smaller spots that HAVE been counted?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 days blank, 65 for 2018, 62%

Solar flux is 69

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/04/2018 at 22:23, Crepuscular Ray said:

New method, as far as I can remember.

I guess they don't make the threshold - you must have better eyesight than me, as  I can't see any spots! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been looking at past sunspot count archive records on spaceweather.com, there is no annual number of sun spotless days for 2008. In their archive records for December 30 2009 they have 260 days of spotless days.  In  the new adjusted method that appears on the present page the number is 51 days.  The archives records has 2010 with a massive 486 days which is lower than on the home page of 260 days. I wonder what would the current number of sun spotless days this year would be if we were still using the Wolf method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Katrine Basso said:

I have been looking at past sunspot count archive records on spaceweather.com, there is no annual number of sun spotless days for 2008. In their archive records for December 30 2009 they have 260 days of spotless days.  In  the new adjusted method that appears on the present page the number is 51 days.  The archives records has 2010 with a massive 486 days which is lower than on the home page of 260 days. I wonder what would the current number of sun spotless days this year would be if we were still using the Wolf method.

486 days in a year ? Am I missing something? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunspot number: 0

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 4 days
2018 total: 67 days (62%)

The Radio Sun
10.7 cm flux: 71 sfu 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will be interesting to see what the polarity is of the latest spot. I read somewhere the last spot had reversed polarity which would indicate the start of the next cycle! Hope that's not the case.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, drgl said:

It will be interesting to see what the polarity is of the latest spot. I read somewhere the last spot had reversed polarity which would indicate the start of the next cycle! Hope that's not the case.....

Hopefully, @Yarmy will be able to tell us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are we talking about 2706 that just rotated onto the east limb?

20180420_053000_512_HMIB.jpg

 

It's an SC24 group. The white indicates positive magnetic field lines emerging from the Sun, and the black indicates negative field lines where they go back in (so to speak). The pattern is reversed in the Southern Hemisphere (black to the left, white to the right). It's also very low latitude which is the other indicator that it belongs to the current cycle. SC25 spots in the Northern Hemisphere will have black to the left, and white to the right, and will start appearing at higher latitudes.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/04/2018 at 10:18, Yarmy said:

The new small sunspot that has appeared in the Southern Hemisphere is notable because it has reversed polarity. What does that mean? Well, it could mean it belongs to SC25, or it could just be an anomalous group for SC24. On average, something like 3% of all sunspot groups exhibit reversed polarity.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/04/2018 at 12:49, Yarmy said:

The first reversed polarity sunspot of SC24 arrived in late 2007, yet 2008 and 2009 both had more than 250 spotless days so it doesn't preclude a long, drawn out minimum even if it is an SC25 spot.

 

 Just thought I’d quote these from  a previous discussion on this since we are back on the subject. 

Edited by Chris.R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Chris :)

Edited by drgl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   1 member

×