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Posted
  • Location: Camborne
  • Location: Camborne

    Ferocious snowstorm hits the US

    Yet another storm is sweeping across North America, bringing heavy snow to much of the east.

    The snow is now clearing the Midwest, but the east coast is expecting the storm to rage for a couple of days.

    By the time it clear, some parts of the northeast will have received over 50cm of snow.

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    http://www.aljazeera...0955780240.html

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    Best time lapse I've seen so far.    

    February 15th Storm   Hello All,   Well its been quite a few weeks lately, we've had huge amounts of snow here in New Brunswick, the most I've seen in the 8 years I have lived here. I think in les

    I wish our downgrades were like that

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    Posted
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland

    We got 25 cm's in the end - it was nice to see especially as it was the weekend.

    It seems like the snow this year has been psuhed out east to you guys as this was prob only our 4th major snowfall since start of November.

    Expect March and April to produce big storms for all of us. Its when we get the most snow and no doubt you guys over there in the Maritimes too.

    Does seem the East boar the brunt, I know Ontario did well for snow, snowiest winter since 2007/08. And alot more storms this year effecting NE America this year.

    Not sure how much more snow this season (had a 100mm of rain the past weekend), the pattern is very blocked for the foreseeable keeping any storms well South of us for a week or so. March and April can produce big storms, the biggest snow storm on record here occurred in April though the long range forecast is for a mild Spring so maybe wont see it this year.

    Edited by glosteroldboy
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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    Does seem the East boar the brunt, I know Ontario did well for snow, snowiest winter since 2007/08. And alot more storms this year effecting NE America this year.

    Not sure how much more snow this season (had a 100mm of rain the past weekend), the pattern is very blocked for the foreseeable keeping any storms well South of us for a week or so. March and April can produce big storms, the biggest snow storm on record here occurred in April though the long range forecast is for a mild Spring so maybe wont see it this year.

    Not sure about that remember Ontario is a very big province..southern and south west Ontario were not very snowy at all
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    Posted
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)
  • Location: Eastbourne, East Sussex (work in Mid Sussex)

    Federal government shuts down as major snowstorm moves east

    Energy companies and local governments in DC, Maryland and Virginia place crews on standby ahead of snow

    After pummeling the nation's midsection with heavy snow, a late-winter storm made its way Wednesday to the nation's capital, where residents braced for the possibility of power outages. As the storm closed in, the federal government said its offices in the Washington, DC, area would be closed Wednesday. Many major school systems around Washington and Baltimore announced pre-emptive closures as well. By early Wednesday, wet snow was falling in the Washington area. It was accumulating on the grass in some areas, but not on the streets as temperatures hovered above freezing. The worst of the storm was expected to arrive by midday.

    The storm brought around 10 inches of snow to weather-hardened Chicago by late Tuesday, when snow was also starting to come down in parts of Virginia. Schools were closed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois, and more than 1,100 flights were cancelled at Chicago's two major airports, prompting delays and closures at others. Airlines along the storm's projected path cut flights too, including hundreds more Wednesday at Dulles and Reagan National airports in the Washington area, according to FlightAware.com. While there were no initial reports of major accidents in the Chicago area, a semi-trailer slid off a snow-covered interstate in western Wisconsin, killing one person. The search for a second person, believed to be a passenger, was suspended overnight.

    As the storm pushed toward the mid-Atlantic states, forecasters were predicting snow accumulations of 3 to 7in (7.6 to 18cm) in the Washington area and up to 16in (40cm) in the western Maryland mountains by Wednesday night. Tidal flooding was possible along the Delaware coast, the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay and the lower Potomac River. Still recovering from superstorm Sandy, the Jersey Shore was preparing for another possible hit Wednesday and Thursday. The storm should bring rain and snow, but one of the biggest problems could be flooding in areas where dunes were washed away and many damaged homes still sit open and exposed. Those areas could get 2 to 4in of snow, with Monmouth and some inland counties possibly getting as much as 6in.

    An upper-level, low-pressure system coming in from the northwest and a surface low sweeping up from Kentucky were expected to converge along the Virginia-West Virginia line, bringing heavy precipitation, cold temperatures and winds gusting up to 35 mph. "Whenever you're talking about that much heavy, wet snow and those winds of 20-30 mph with some higher gusts, there's a concern for numerous power outages," said National Weather Service meteorologist Jared Klein in Sterling, Virginia. Both Baltimore Gas and Electric Co and Pepco in the Washington area said they would have extra line crews available.

    The Maryland State Highway Administration pre-positioned tow trucks at rest stops and park-and-ride lots, and told its tree-trimmers to get ready. "We certainly anticipate some signal outages. We certainly anticipate some trees down, which can cause power outages," spokesman David Buck said. The closure of many schools and offices was expected to alleviate snarled traffic in the District of Columbia. The Metro transit system was operating normal train service but said some bus routes would be suspended. Subway workers were focused on clearing snow from tracks, platforms and parking lots.

    The Maryland Transit Administration was monitoring overhead power lines for snow and ice accumulation. In Virginia, the storm was expected to dip along the coast and dump moisture-laden snow inland totaling a foot in the Blue Ridge Mountains and up to 21 inches in higher elevations. Dominion Virginia Power had also alerted out-of-state utilities it might require assistance if the storm lived up to its billing.

    Virginia governor Bob McDonnell directed executive branch agencies to allow eligible nonessential employees to work remotely or to "be generous" in approving leave requests for workers who live in regions under a storm watch or warning. The state's emergency operations center was to open Wednesday morning, and state transportation officials advised motorists to avoid travel at the height of the storm. "The snow is going to come down at a very fast rate," agency spokesman Sandy Myers said. "We just need folks to stay off the roads so the plow drivers can hopefully keep up with the storm."

    The Baltimore-Washington area's last snowstorm struck January 26, 2011. It hit Washington during the evening rush hour, causing some motorists to be stuck in traffic nearly overnight. It dropped 5in on Washington and 7.8in on Baltimore, knocked out power to about 320,000 homes and contributed to six deaths. Since then, the federal government has changed its bad-weather policies to allow workers to leave their offices sooner or to work from home if major storms are expected.

    The US office of personnel management, which sets leave policies for 300,000 federal workers, said non-emergency employees of the federal government would be granted excused absences for Wednesday. The agency was criticized after the 2011 storm for waiting too long to tell workers to go home, leading to gridlock. Still, some mid-Atlantic residents were looking forward to the snow. "I love it – I love it when we have snow days," Baltimore homemaker Mary White said Tuesday afternoon as she hurried to finish errands.

    The current storm is part of a system that started in Montana, hit the Dakotas and Minnesota on Monday and then barreled through Wisconsin and Illinois on its way to Washington.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/mar/06/federal-government-shuts-down-snowstorm

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
    This is the same storm that struck southern Alberta on Sunday..and dumped up to 30cms of snow here.
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    Posted
  • Location: Canmore, AB [4296ft above sea level] & North Kent [350ft above sea level]
  • Location: Canmore, AB [4296ft above sea level] & North Kent [350ft above sea level]

    ^ Yeah but it goes unreported in the news cos its Canada and we can handle it.

    Snowfall warning for

    Kananaskis - Canmore issued 10:08 AM MST Wednesday 06 March 2013

    10 to 15 centimetres of snow by Thursday morning.

    A low pressure system currently off the British Columbia coast will move inland over the next day or so, bringing with it cloud and snowfall. As the system swings inland this afternoon, snowfall is expected to begin and then will become heavier this evening. Total snowfall accumulations by Thursday morning are expected to be in the 10 to 15 centimetre range, especially in areas close to the foothills. Snow should taper off during the day on Thursday.

    Guess we'll get a dusting then if they have the warning out lol

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    Posted
  • Location: Canmore, AB [4296ft above sea level] & North Kent [350ft above sea level]
  • Location: Canmore, AB [4296ft above sea level] & North Kent [350ft above sea level]

    lol looks like I was spot on - nothing but a dusting here and the radar is dying. Funny how they always mess it up when the warning is 24 hours in advance

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    Posted
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada

    We had about 60 mm of rain when that weekend system first came inland on Friday (1st of March). It poured almost 24 hours non-stop, which is about equal to all the rain that fell in the previous two months (normally much more would be recorded here).

    The storm brought 50 cm of snow to higher elevations of northern Virginia but was largely a bust for DC and Baltimore where the airports reported less than 2 cm to about 7 cm on the northwest side of DC. It snowed quite a bit however most of it was melting on contact then it turned to rain. Same story in PHL and a sleety mix now starting in NYC and BOS. Some inland areas of southern New England may get 10-20 cm but in general this is an ocean storm now and heading for the Azores, then it may show up on the charts south of the UK by late next week.

    The Greenland blocking high reached 1077 mb on Tuesday and at one point the pressure reached 1060 mb at sea level in the northern Canadian arctic but that intense high is now slowly weakening.

    Edited by Roger J Smith
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    Posted
  • Location: Irlam
  • Location: Irlam

    Looks as Washington DC has missed out again. A kick in the teeth for snow lovers in the capital. They not had a decent fall of snow for at least 2 years and the forecasts were suggesting a decent fall. Instead, it just wasn't cold enough and they missed out again. Just shows we are not the only ones to miss out.

    Edited by Weather-history
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    Posted
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland

    Not sure about that remember Ontario is a very big province..southern and south west Ontario were not very snowy at all

    I suppose though in general I think they have done well for snow from reports I've read. Toronto last month had something like it's biggest single storm since 1999 and a couple of other decent falls which is better than the pretty much no snow they have got in recent years, I suppose that part of Ontario is not really known for lots of snow.

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    Posted
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland

    We had about 60 mm of rain when that weekend system first came inland on Friday (1st of March). It poured almost 24 hours non-stop, which is about equal to all the rain that fell in the previous two months (normally much more would be recorded here).

    Last weekend we had about 100mm of rain over 5 days (most of it (60mm) fell in 12 hours on the 4th March) from the 28th Feb to 4th of March, 72 hours of "pea soup" fog was also recorded in that period along with 30 hours of freezing precip. Was a grim few days! Feels like spring here now though!

    Edited by glosteroldboy
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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    I suppose though in general I think they have done well for snow from reports I've read. Toronto last month had something like it's biggest single storm since 1999 and a couple of other decent falls which is better than the pretty much no snow they have got in recent years, I suppose that part of Ontario is not really known for lots of snow.

    Southern Ontario had a very snowy winter 2010-2011..this year it was snow free pretty much until January
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    Posted
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada

    I lived in southern or central Ontario for many years and as far as snow in Toronto, it tends to come and go several times each winter, bare ground is not unusual at any stage of winter there, and a foot of snow can fall any time from late November to mid-April. February is often a very dry month and it's difficult to get the combination of cold and snow, the milder Februaries will become spring-like with rain dominant. The first year I had a weather station (1964) made a strong impression on me because the sunshine hours were about three times normal and that month still stands as a record for February.

    Further north in the snow belt, February is not by any means as snowy as December or January can be, and even there they rely more on passing lows than lake effect for any snow, although a very strong storm could produce February lake effect, the frequency really falls off sharply after the last week of January. You can get some weak lake effect in the spring months too.

    The normal seasonal snowfall for Toronto is about 150 cm and for Barrie in the snow belt just north of the city, about 400 cm. Over towards Peterborough where I used to live the normal winter would see about 250 cm, the increase over Toronto is partly due to storm track (more marginal cases go to snow) and the outer edges of the snow squalls from Georgian Bay reaching that far inland on occasion. Ottawa has an annual average closer to 300 cm but even there the winter of 2011-12 was almost snow-free and this winter was not overly productive (yet).

    I say yet because the worst snowstorm I ever saw was actually in April (1975) and that came after a very open winter with almost no significant snowfall events and no lake effect worth mentioning either. I was living in the snow belt and the ground was bare and flooded in late February, then covered with 3-8 foot snow drifts on April 3rd, so ya never know.

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    lol looks like I was spot on - nothing but a dusting here and the radar is dying. Funny how they always mess it up when the warning is 24 hours in advance

    we got just over 5cms here..and was the worst drive into work so far this season..had no problems when we had 25cm or 30cm..but the Deerfoot was a nightmare this morning..and i went to work at 5.15am what normally takes 20 mins took an hour and 45.
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    Posted
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland

    I lived in southern or central Ontario for many years and as far as snow in Toronto, it tends to come and go several times each winter, bare ground is not unusual at any stage of winter there, and a foot of snow can fall any time from late November to mid-April. February is often a very dry month and it's difficult to get the combination of cold and snow, the milder Februaries will become spring-like with rain dominant. The first year I had a weather station (1964) made a strong impression on me because the sunshine hours were about three times normal and that month still stands as a record for February.

    Further north in the snow belt, February is not by any means as snowy as December or January can be, and even there they rely more on passing lows than lake effect for any snow, although a very strong storm could produce February lake effect, the frequency really falls off sharply after the last week of January. You can get some weak lake effect in the spring months too.

    The normal seasonal snowfall for Toronto is about 150 cm and for Barrie in the snow belt just north of the city, about 400 cm. Over towards Peterborough where I used to live the normal winter would see about 250 cm, the increase over Toronto is partly due to storm track (more marginal cases go to snow) and the outer edges of the snow squalls from Georgian Bay reaching that far inland on occasion. Ottawa has an annual average closer to 300 cm but even there the winter of 2011-12 was almost snow-free and this winter was not overly productive (yet).

    I say yet because the worst snowstorm I ever saw was actually in April (1975) and that came after a very open winter with almost no significant snowfall events and no lake effect worth mentioning either. I was living in the snow belt and the ground was bare and flooded in late February, then covered with 3-8 foot snow drifts on April 3rd, so ya never know.

    Interesting Roger, is a bit like here the snow can come and go and a foot (or more) is always possible in any month from November to April. Overall though we get a lot more snow than Toronto and all of Southern Ontario I suspect.

    This year February was very good in St Johns for deepish lying snow being present for most of the month, January was actually colder and had a bit more snow (though alot of it came from the 2 foot blizzard which thawed immediately and melted in the following few days) than Feb but had too many rain/mild days that wiped out the snowpack.

    March well it's almost like spring so far, dry, sunny spells and temps 2-3 degrees above by day (is only the chilly Northerly flow keeping the feel a bit wintry) still got some lying snow though it will all be gone I think (bar the man made piles) this time next week with the spring theme continuing. I doubt we are done with the snow yet though so soon in the year!

    Edited by glosteroldboy
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    Posted
  • Location: Camborne
  • Location: Camborne

    13 March 2013

    The dreaded "D" word has the California wine industry on edge. We're talking about "drought," given that January and February were deemed the driest on record in the northern Sierra Nevada, the heart of water supplies for California farmers.

    While rain and snow totals are well ahead of last season's overall numbers, the past two months have hit hard. These challenging conditions are thus far a turn from the stellar 2012 growing season, which resulted in a state-record crop boasting 3.89 million tons of crushed wine grapes. Farmers and wine industry observers are staying hopeful for a good soaking this spring.

    http://www.desdemonadespair.net/2013/03/california-has-driest-january-and.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    13 March 2013

    The dreaded "D" word has the California wine industry on edge. We're talking about "drought," given that January and February were deemed the driest on record in the northern Sierra Nevada, the heart of water supplies for California farmers.

    While rain and snow totals are well ahead of last season's overall numbers, the past two months have hit hard. These challenging conditions are thus far a turn from the stellar 2012 growing season, which resulted in a state-record crop boasting 3.89 million tons of crushed wine grapes. Farmers and wine industry observers are staying hopeful for a good soaking this spring.

    http://www.desdemona..._medium=twitter

    That's nothing we have only had 26mm of precip so far this year which is just 1inch which is less than half of what they have received in California..in fact February was almost completely dry here. All to do with that big pacific high pressure cell that set up through virtually all of January and Feb.
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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    T'was a thoroughly miserable weekend just gone very cold..5cm of snow yesterday temps never got above -14c and with a hefty north easterly wind the windchill stuck around -25c throughout. March potentially could turn into a cold cold monthPosted Image

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    A very nice weekend just gone...wall to wall sunshine all be it pretty cold for the time of year...reached -8c on Sat and -1c yesterday..this week looks like spring finally arrives...sunny with a warming trend all week and could reach +15c by the Easter weekend.

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    Posted
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland
  • Location: St Johns, Newfoundland

    A very nice weekend just gone...wall to wall sunshine all be it pretty cold for the time of year...reached -8c on Sat and -1c yesterday..this week looks like spring finally arrives...sunny with a warming trend all week and could reach +15c by the Easter weekend.

    We had a sunny Spring weekend though snow is back this morning, shouldn't be anymore than 10cm.

    Spring has been making plenty of appearances here in March, pretty much snow free now all the lying snow had melted, although looks on the back burner this week with frequent flurries and small amounts I doubt it will stick around very long as doesn't look very cold in general (or very warm kind of stuck around freezing to 2 degrees)

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    Posted
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada
  • Location: Rossland BC Canada

    Here's good news, the sun is not broken -- sunny and 15 C here on the west coast with considerable high cloudiness. Really a very nice day and some people in t-shirts and shorts although it's more like no jacket weather for normal folk.

    The other day, worth noting, Springfield IL set a new all-time snowfall record of 18 inches on Monday and St Louis MO had their latest 12-inch record breaker (24h or daily) in over a century overnight Sunday-Monday. Also about 8 inches in parts of Ohio, then the storm broke up and gave 3-5 inch amounts near but not right in Washington DC before pulling out to sea (it's that deep low southeast of Newfoundland now).

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    Posted
  • Location: Camborne
  • Location: Camborne

    Drought has stranglehold on West

    The extended drought continues to choke the Western half of the country, with water supply concerns rising in New Mexico and Texas as anxiety about another bone-dry summer is raised. This week, the dryness grew worse in Texas while expanding into California, Montana, and Oregon, so that most of the land west of the Mississippi River was under some form of drought conditions, according to Thursday’s update to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

    Conditions in the Great Plains remain dire: parts of eastern Texas are facing rainfall shortages on the order of 8-16 inches. Reservoir levels in Donley County, in the Texas Panhandle, were 12 inches below normal. Cimarron County, Okla., has gone 100 consecutive days with less than a quarter inch of rainfall. Wichita Falls, Texas, a city of about 100,000, has been added to the state’s list of communities that may run out of water within 180 days, although city managers don’t think that is likely. According to reporting by the Texas Tribune, Wichita Falls will likely enact unprecedented water restrictions by the end of the summer, which would ban the filling of swimming pools, restrict car-washing businesses, and affect industrial water users.

    http://www.standard.net/stories/2013/03/29/drought-has-stranglehold-west

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    Posted
  • Location: Canmore, AB [4296ft above sea level] & North Kent [350ft above sea level]
  • Location: Canmore, AB [4296ft above sea level] & North Kent [350ft above sea level]

    It reached 18oC here today and clear blue skies. I was sat in the garden in shorts and t-shirt getting a nice tan. Its been about 5 days of sun now and gradually getting warmer from 12oC last Thursday to todays high. I am enjoying the most of it as we are forecast a few inches of snow by weeks end

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    Posted
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)
  • Location: Back in Edmonton Alberta(via Chelmsford, Exeter & Calgary)

    It reached 18oC here today and clear blue skies. I was sat in the garden in shorts and t-shirt getting a nice tan. Its been about 5 days of sun now and gradually getting warmer from 12oC last Thursday to todays high. I am enjoying the most of it as we are forecast a few inches of snow by weeks end

    i must be a day behind weather wise..it is forecast to reach 18c today here in Calgary..and as you say cooling down with snow forecast for the weekend and temps back down to 0cPosted Image
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