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mike Meehan

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Status Replies posted by mike Meehan

  1. Hi Mike , just seen this great story which you may have seen but if not here you go .:)

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-39220403

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      That's the type I did my first solos in in 1959 - great fun, the weren't aerobatic 'cos the wings would drop off if you turned it upside down but they taught m how to do stall turns and it took a further 6 months to get rid of the grin on my face!

      Like you I am not over passionate about flying in airliners - small aircraft are much more fun  :yahoo:

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

  2. Hi Mike , just seen this great story which you may have seen but if not here you go .:)

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-39220403

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      Thanks Mark, I would have loved to have flown one of those - from what I hear they were a pilot's dream.

      Currently I am learning to glide again in a K21 at Dunstable but at my age it is taking a lot longer than the first time round in 1959 in a T31!

      And when I get the chance on the Costa Brava, this Foxbat, the other name for it. Strangely enough it is easier to fly than a K21.

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

  3. Hi Mike , This might seem as a quite crazy suggestion but I see from your photo you are some kind of pilot. I have been interested in the 2nd world war since I was young and want to go to the duxford airshow next year . I love weather , love planes and steam engines it seems we only disagree about Europe . I realise you were born in 42 

  4. I had oysters yesterday evening. Reduced from 11,50 to 2,50 for 12 of them - size 3. Thanks to my trusty Swiss Army Penknife I opened them up and had them with a salad and tabasco sauce and fresh lemon juice. Bliss food...

  5. Hi Mike , This might seem as a quite crazy suggestion but I see from your photo you are some kind of pilot. I have been interested in the 2nd world war since I was young and want to go to the duxford airshow next year . I love weather , love planes and steam engines it seems we only disagree about Europe . I realise you were born in 42 

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      Always been interested in aviation Mark - was in the ATC as a lad, applied to join RAF as aircrew but was not selected after the 3 days interview but went into the Met Office instead, later changed course to join the police.

      For a long time could not afford to fly but in recent years have gone back to gliding at the London Gliding Club but at my age finding it harder than when I weren't lad and still not totally trusted to go solo again.  Flew solo in an ATC glider in March 1959! 

      The picture you see is me flying an Aeroprackt 22 at a little aero club at L'Estartit on the Costa Brava. It is in fact a 3 axis micro light and in fact easier to fly than the K21's I fly at Dunstable.

      Whatever it is, except for boring airliners, it is getting airborne which I love.

    2. (See 4 other replies to this status update)

  6. Hi Mike i thought , as someone who is interested in history , that you might like to read this snippet from some of the work by the respected historians tam devine and michael lynch regarding the  myth about darien......

    Quote

     

    Myth number one – Scotland was bankrupt in 1707.

     

    Well , no, it was not.

     

    The Burghs were cash rich and the Scottish economy in the decade prior to 1707 was growing at 2.5% per annum according to research by the historian Michael Lynch. So who was bankrupt? Well that was the Scottish land owners who had mortgaged their lands to fund the Darien Scheme and if they had not been bailed out by Westminster, the Burgh middle classes would have taken control of Scotland – something the English Government could not allow. The ‘Whig’ English Government had also been buying off the Jacobite Lords in Scotland to ensure the Hanoverian succession at the cost of a £1 million a year ( £1 billion in today’s money). Further the Jacobite Lords were playing the ‘we could ask the French for help’ card which meant  ‘Horse Guards’ had to keep English Regiments on the Scottish Border that were needed by Marlborough in continental Europe to prop up England’s war against France.

     

    What actually happened was the incoming Tory Government of the day decided they were not gaining anything as Defoe quickly reported that most of the ‘Jacobite Lords’ were unlikely to support James’ VIIth claim on the thrones of Scotland and England so shifted the bribes from the ‘Jacobite Lords’ to the Tory inclined Scottish Lowland Lords who were in trouble with their Darien mortgage repayments coming due and being in danger of defaulting – the ‘parcel o rogues’ of Burns poem. The English Parliament needed the Union to secure their Northern border once and for all and created pressure to persuade the Scots that ‘Union’ was a good idea – one of which was siding with the Spanish to ensure Darien failed and another passing laws to exclude Scottish traders from all England’s colonies by imposing excessive duties

     

    best wishes mike:)

  7. Hi Mike i thought , as someone who is interested in history , that you might like to read this snippet from some of the work by the respected historians tam devine and michael lynch regarding the  myth about darien......

    Quote

     

    Myth number one – Scotland was bankrupt in 1707.

     

    Well , no, it was not.

     

    The Burghs were cash rich and the Scottish economy in the decade prior to 1707 was growing at 2.5% per annum according to research by the historian Michael Lynch. So who was bankrupt? Well that was the Scottish land owners who had mortgaged their lands to fund the Darien Scheme and if they had not been bailed out by Westminster, the Burgh middle classes would have taken control of Scotland – something the English Government could not allow. The ‘Whig’ English Government had also been buying off the Jacobite Lords in Scotland to ensure the Hanoverian succession at the cost of a £1 million a year ( £1 billion in today’s money). Further the Jacobite Lords were playing the ‘we could ask the French for help’ card which meant  ‘Horse Guards’ had to keep English Regiments on the Scottish Border that were needed by Marlborough in continental Europe to prop up England’s war against France.

     

    What actually happened was the incoming Tory Government of the day decided they were not gaining anything as Defoe quickly reported that most of the ‘Jacobite Lords’ were unlikely to support James’ VIIth claim on the thrones of Scotland and England so shifted the bribes from the ‘Jacobite Lords’ to the Tory inclined Scottish Lowland Lords who were in trouble with their Darien mortgage repayments coming due and being in danger of defaulting – the ‘parcel o rogues’ of Burns poem. The English Parliament needed the Union to secure their Northern border once and for all and created pressure to persuade the Scots that ‘Union’ was a good idea – one of which was siding with the Spanish to ensure Darien failed and another passing laws to exclude Scottish traders from all England’s colonies by imposing excessive duties

     

    best wishes mike:)

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      Balmaha, 

      Thanks for that - I am always interested in history - there is so much to learn from it but it seems we never do but keep making the same mistakes time and time again with so many important decisions being made to placate expediency rather than the long term view which with little doubt would be better.

      It seems that government tactics have not changed over the years - I recall seeing a French newspaper headline some 20 to 30 years ago in something like 'Le Monde' in France after the tone of 'Le pernicieux anglais' at the time I felt affronted but after the more recent shenanigans I now realise there was possibly good reason for it.

      But to describe it in technical terms, basically the English parliament did not give a sod about anybody else provided they came out as the winners.

      The trouble with that kind policy is that it can so often come back and bite you in the a***, often when you least expect it and can sometimes be the most painful.

      Strangely enough, you may have realised, that I am out of step sometimes with my English compatriots - I put it down to my great great great father being born in County Clare in 1839, as I found out recently. I also believe in the theory of genetic throw backs - I am one :D which I think explains a lot.

      Being baptised a Catholic with Catholic school to the age of about 8 years, sent to live with my grandmother* who was Methodist and going to their Sunday School, whilst going to a C of E day school also did something to shape my ideas. 

      *Old fashioned open range fire place, tin bath in front of the fire, lav outside up garden.

      By, yer't tell 'em now, they won't believe yer! :)

      Perhaps in some ways even though being one of those detestable Sassenachs, probably we ain't that much different.  

      Mike

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

  8. I wouldn't expect or want David Cameron to be of any help - he has already caused enough problems, however I think that it is important to let our parliamentary representatives know the depth of our feeling over this.

    We will see what we will see.

    Mike 

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      I was about in the 70's and that was the time Britain was described as the sick man of Europe since then we have made a lot of headway despite the credit crisis of 2008.

      I have also sent an E-Mail to the House of Lords for the attention of Lord Peter Mandelson - I still think our best chance is to continue to put the pressure on the Government whilst we still have a little bit of window.

      Not sure about sending one to David Cameron - he was the one who said he would abide by the result - what I am banking on is that the majority of MP's are pro EU and they may have their own minds on this.

    2. (See 4 other replies to this status update)

  9. I wouldn't expect or want David Cameron to be of any help - he has already caused enough problems, however I think that it is important to let our parliamentary representatives know the depth of our feeling over this.

    We will see what we will see.

    Mike 

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      Maybe Nick but I cannot take this decision lying down - my view is that the referendum was fundamentally flawed by reason of the lies told by the leave side and that a decision obtained through dishonesty and fraud cannot be regarded as true democratic decision and for that reason I do not accept it.

      To this end I have written to my MP - this does not become official until ratified by parliament - the chances are strong that they will but by the same token there is some chance if enough people make known  their feelings by writing to their MP's that that they may at least pause and give the matter deeper thought.

      Add to this the much stronger possibility that Scotland will leave the Union and possibly Northern Ireland as well is bound to add something to their deliberations.

      So I feel that we should do everything possible to try and achieve a non ratification whilst the window is still open.

      The odds are against it but it is just possible people power may work and if the government can find a face saving formula to present to the public the day may be saved.

      If I were in a position of power my first port of call would be the EU Commission to inform them that the result is disputed and ask for time to sort it out.

    2. (See 4 other replies to this status update)

  10. Knocker,

    I have written to my MP suggesting that this referendum was fundamentally flawed by a deceitful leave campaign leaving people confused with a load of waffle, some of mit being hysterical.

    I think it might help if all of us on the remain side did this.

    There is also a petition to request a re-run of the referendum:

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/131215

    My views are that if this is granted it should be properly supervised to ensure that the campaigns are honest, ethical and pertinent to the issue giving people positive and correct information to enable their choice.

    I would rather there not have been the necessity for a further ref and feel like I need one like a hole in the head but when you consider the alternative, to me it is the better choice.

    I realise my current attitude is likely to upset a lot of people but just is not in my nature to take things lying down.

    For your information should you decide to act on it.

    Best wishes,

    Mike

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      Malcolm,

      I see your point but I have thought deeply about this and to be honest we had enough trouble with this one but if push comes to shove I would rather have one but this time have the campaigning properly supervised, say by a trio of three judges. It may not work but at least sending in the petition to parliament will give the MP's something to think about.

      There is also an outside chance that they may baulk at the idea of breaking up the UK which sounds as though it may be on the cards.

      If all else fails I will have to make further attempts to 'er indoors to move to France but she is resisting at the moment.

      I never dreamed of these problems when taking that met office course in the huts at Stanmore so many year ago.

      Best wishes.

      Mike

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

  11. Once more my flabber is ghasted - the cherry tree in my back garden is now in bloom - before the end of January!

     

    1. mike Meehan

      mike Meehan

      Unfortunately the High is in the wrong place for anything decent :(

    2. (See 2 other replies to this status update)

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