Jump to content

Ndc Ozzie

Members
  • Content Count

    66
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

71

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Rugby
  • Interests
    Gardening, gaming,underground music production, weather extremes.
  • Weather Preferences
    Thunderstorms, high teens to low 20's,sunny and convective

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. just had another shower and all it doing making it more humid now
  2. just started raining here,sun out and oh it stopped.10 second shower l0l.wow thunder
  3. 14.5 is the high so far today,wet and windy and got soaked doing a 5 mile walk,rather this than the 34.7 on thursday though.
  4. Read above post i put from Paul at ukww,the channel will kill the storm
  5. The Temperatures across Northern France are now sufficiently high close to the coast for some Surface based storms to fire (these are utilising the energy and heat at the surface rather than firing from within the EML contained in the plume which has moved north. Temperatures of 41.4C and DP of 15.6C are enough with some moisture convergence along the north French coast to force the ascent (Synoptic scale forcing is not required here) The cooling i mentioned above required for storms over the UK is also not needed over N France as the surface and lower 1-1.5KM of the atmosphere is much warmer than over the UK (if you overlayed an ascent from Surrey over this Paris ascent the Surrey ascent would be shifted to the left with very little if any CAPE available until the cooling aloft takes place. The storm close to Rouen is generating frequent lightning, but it will not move over the English Channel or develop further north as its not routed or anchored to the EML but instead to the heated land over France. (This storm will hate the english channel, the others which formed from the EML do not care about the English Channel) Trappes 11Z Ascent, A rather dry and hot profile, but closer to the coast enough moisture and convergence to focus ascent. Verified by Satellite observations of -53 to -55C Paul Blight ukww
  6. yup looks like wrexham gonna have some fun and games very shortly
  7. 14:00 Update Added back in Northern England to the 70% Risk area. Thunderstorms have developed in an area around the Welsh Marches in what appears to be an area of 925mb, 850mb confluence (SSW winds over SW England and increasing SSE backing SE Winds over England) This confluence focusing the moisture within the western edge of the plume as it advects Northwards. These storms further developing as they move into NW England as the rest of the afternoon progresses. I now have something of a headache, The Hirlam 06Z has this area as the main area of development, EURO4 has the area to the east of Greenwich and the Arpege and AROME models are somewhere between. No one model is handling the plume completely correctly and its very complex thermodynamic structure and subtleties in Temperature, Dewpoint and Wetbulb. I like aspects of the HIRLAM, but suggest its probably overdoing the convection a little bit, I also think storms will fire in the plume over England during the afternoon, but it wont be until this evening that there is sufficient uplift, cooling and spin from the trough and the 925/850mb confluence zones will also be aligned to take advantage of the very high 20-23C Theta-W 850mb plume fromPJB UKWW
  8. a cap basicly stops clouds towering and forming thunderstorms,i'm sure some one with better knowledge that me can explain better.found this Cap (also called "Lid") A layer of relatively warm air aloft, usually several thousand feet above the ground, which suppresses or delays the development of thunderstorms. Air parcels rising into this layer become cooler than the surrounding air, which inhibits their ability to rise further and produce thunderstorms. As such, the cap often prevents or delays thunderstorm development even in the presence of extreme instability. However, if the cap is removed or weakened, then explosive thunderstorm development can occur. The cap is an important ingredient in most severe thunderstorm episodes, as it serves to separate warm, moist air below and cooler, drier air above. With the cap in place, air below it can continue to warm and/or moisten, thus increasing the amount of potential instability. Or, air above it can cool, which also increases potential instability. But without a cap, either process (warming/moistening at low levels or cooling aloft) results in a faster release of available instability - often before instability levels become large enough to support severe weather development.
  9. Torro - the UK's Tornado and Storm Research Organisation 4 mins · TORRO TORNADO WATCH 2019/005 A TORRO TORNADO WATCH has been issued at 13:55BST on Thursday 25th July 2019 Valid from/until: 13:55 - 23:59BST on Thursday 25th July 2019 for the following regions of the United Kingdom & Ireland: Parts of E Wales Parts of the Midlands N & E England S and E Scotland THREATS Tornadoes, perhaps strong; hail to 60mm diameter; wind gusts to 60mph; CG lightning SYNOPSIS Scattered elevated thunderstorms are initiating over Herefordshire and these will move quickly north, with a risk of becoming severe in the next hour or so as they become more surface-based. Other storms are likely to form over parts of the Midlands and N England, all moving north at around 40mph. Shear will be sufficient for storm organisation, including supercells - any supercell would take more of a NNE track. Low-level shear is expected to be fairly high, especially later this afternoon/early evening - enhancing the tornado risk with any supercell which can develop. There is a small chance of a strong tornado, given the shear/instability parameter space. Large hail is also likely with any supercell which can form, perhaps 40-60mm diameter. Other thunderstorms are forming near Hitchin and will also move N or NNE, perhaps becoming severe with attendant risks as above. It should be noted that, as always, many places will miss the storms entirely - overall, the highest risk of the hazards mentioned above appears to be over parts of the N Midlands and N England. Forecaster: RPK
  10. 33c here at 1pm,sweltering in me narrowboat and does look like we may get shower in next couple of hours as a lot more cloud has arrived now.
×
×
  • Create New...